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Triangle Statistics


nyxmike

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  • 7 months later...

I didn't want to start a new thread, but after reading about Durham and the Orange Line it has me intrigued about the Triangle.

Is Durham and Raleigh competitors? What's the relationship like between the two? I would think if they were In the same county, it wouldn't be that big of a deal, but with the 2 cities being in different counties cause friction between the 2?

Is there any chance downtown Durham might rival downtown Raleigh? Are they on different leagues or already similar?

Is Duham Becoming a thorn in Raleigh's side or are the 2 both in love with each other and benefit each other greatly?

Edited by AirNostrumMAD
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It seems to me that Raleigh and Durham are two quite different cities that are linked by RTP. I think both of the cities have to compete with RTP, so they aren't too focused on competing against each other. The only thorn holding Wake back from the transit tax is the county commissioners. The local governments of Raleigh and most of the major suburbs support the transit tax referendum. Downtown Durham has been improved greatly in the 13 years I've lived in the area, but they aren't on the same level as downtown Raleigh. Development in downtown Raleigh would have to completely stop for downtown Durham to become more developed. 

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I didn't want to start a new thread, but after reading about Durham and the Orange Line it has me intrigued about the Triangle.

Is Durham and Raleigh competitors? What's the relationship like between the two? I would think if they were In the same county, it wouldn't be that big of a deal, but with the 2 cities being in different counties cause friction between the 2?

Is there any chance downtown Durham might rival downtown Raleigh? Are they on different leagues or already similar?

Is Duham Becoming a thorn in Raleigh's side or are the 2 both in love with each other and benefit each other greatly?

In recent years Durham has become virtually a suburb of Raleigh.

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  • 1 year later...

I didn't want to start a new thread, but after reading about Durham and the Orange Line it has me intrigued about the Triangle.

Is Durham and Raleigh competitors? What's the relationship like between the two? I would think if they were In the same county, it wouldn't be that big of a deal, but with the 2 cities being in different counties cause friction between the 2?

Is there any chance downtown Durham might rival downtown Raleigh? Are they on different leagues or already similar?

Is Duham Becoming a thorn in Raleigh's side or are the 2 both in love with each other and benefit each other greatly?

 

Durham and Raleigh get along well. They both need each other somewhat. Neither is quite major-city level without the other's help. Unlike Greensboro and Winston-Salem, where the two cities are similar in size and have similar sized downtowns, Raleigh is twice as large as Durham and Durham's downtown definitely feels like an 'auxiliary' downtown for the metro area. Both cities suffered from sprawl, people abandoning their cores, in the 80s and 90s, but Durham additionally suffered from the perception of crime. Where Raleigh always had some business representation in its core, Durham's was very close to completely empty when the Durham Bulls stadium was built.

 

Historically, Durham was actually the larger of the two cities for a long time, and the more industrial of the two. That, combined with the lack of development downtown for many decades, has caused it to have a greater endowment of historic structures. Those are being saved and re-purposed pretty well, and a lot of activity has returned to the city. Progress is slower though; the city doesn't enjoy the same rate of growth as Raleigh.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Durham and Raleigh get along well. They both need each other somewhat. Neither is quite major-city level without the other's help. Unlike Greensboro and Winston-Salem, where the two cities are similar in size and have similar sized downtowns, Raleigh is twice as large as Durham and Durham's downtown definitely feels like an 'auxiliary' downtown for the metro area. Both cities suffered from sprawl, people abandoning their cores, in the 80s and 90s, but Durham additionally suffered from the perception of crime. Where Raleigh always had some business representation in its core, Durham's was very close to completely empty when the Durham Bulls stadium was built.

Historically, Durham was actually the larger of the two cities for a long time, and the more industrial of the two. That, combined with the lack of development downtown for many decades, has caused it to have a greater endowment of historic structures. Those are being saved and re-purposed pretty well, and a lot of activity has returned to the city. Progress is slower though; the city doesn't enjoy the same rate of growth as Raleigh.

Thanks for that! Since 2012, I've learned a great deal more about the Triangle and the triad. Though I'd still love to know a lot more.

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  • 1 year later...

From 2010 to 2014 US Census

Raleigh grew by 8.9%

Raleigh went from 403,892 to 439,896 for an increase of 36,004.

Raleigh should be near 500,000 by 2010  or  2021,  then it will come under Big city status.

 

Charlotte grew by 10.1%

Charlotte grew from 731,424  to 809,958 for an increase of 78,534.

The Cities  of  #1 Charlotte and  #2 Raleigh gain more population in North Carolina from 2010 t0 2014 than any other cities in North Carolina.

Charlotte and Raleigh are the economic engine of North Carolina and lets hope the GA does not mess them up.

 

 

 

Edited by RiverwoodCLT
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According to this site, Raleigh and Charlotte -- after Tampa and Ocala, FL are the two "big" cities retirees are moving to.  NC is well-represented here as well.  Again, GA and TN -- not so much.  People with money and education are choosing quality over quantity IMHO -- and NC (and SC to a lesser extent) offer something in this country that few other states can -- subtropical beaches and big mountains where it snows; small cool towns and increasingly cosmopolitan cities with funky smaller cities mixed in (Charleston, Asheville, Wilmington).  We also offer the best colleges and universities in the South which generate continuing education opportunities and contribute to the coolness of many of our college towns (Davidson, Elon, Boone).  Add some of the best health care in the country and NC is a truly remarkable place and people are finding this out.   In a way, the fact that NC isn't a bloviator (i.e. GA, TX, TN) means that it still feels like a "secret".  For better or worse, the "secret" is getting harder and harder to keep as more and more people discover just how amazing NC (and the Carolinas) truly are. 

https://www.movebuddha.com/blog/moving-trends/#:~:text=Big city spotlight%3A %231 Tampa,%2C and %2315 San Antonio.

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