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it's just dave

Dave's Nashville

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I just thought it was time to throw a few photos on here. Most of these are recent, a couple not. Hope you enjoy. Almost time for major photo-taking. Spring's coming. Evenutally.

Here's a fun little diddy from July 2004. Hard to believe the changes so far in the Gulch...and the ones to come.

NewGulch.jpg

We'll just start downtown on Commerce at Panera. Always a good way to start a day. Give me coffee.

Panera.jpg

Cranes (a few weeks back) at Music City Central transit hub.

MMCentral.jpg

Why was I IN the Hampton? Never tell, but here's how it looked out the window.

HamptonView.jpg

Hampton and Encore from a distance. SoBro spreading out.

Hampton2.jpg

Late summer shot of Commerce. I thought it was nice.

CommerceSt.jpg

Looking east on Commerce from Rosa 8th.

CommerceNorth.jpg

Photoshop? What's Photoshop?

Broadway with SunTrust and Viridian

Broadway.jpg

From March 2005_Shelby Bridge

BridgeOld.jpg

And, from the bridge in late November 2007.

BridgeNew.jpg

Till next time. See ya.

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Thanks for posting, Dave. The difference in the Gulch is stunning! I look forward to more of your visual trips.

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As always, great post Dave. Thanks for showing pics from a fews years back to compare. Sometimes I lose sight of just how fast the downtown Nashville area is developing.

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Dave, is the photo of the earth-moving equip where the Sobro is going? If so, I didn't even know they were ready to go. Thanks for the pics. It's about the only way I get to see N'vegas these days.

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Great pics!! Keep 'em coming! I really like the one of the Music City Central hub. The two yellow cranes and the density in the background make a unique picture.

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I am with you brother Dave. A lot of changes and more on the way. Great shots. We need to get together for a drive around sometime soon.

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Brain, there was a series of old warehouses on that plot of land that had just been removed. They were a mess and needed to be gone. While driving around it provided a view I hadn't seen before. I don't think this is the site of The SoBro or for anything I know of. But we can be assured, someday it will be.

In some ways, this reminds me of the days when the land was being cleared for the stadium. As each building went down a new view opened up. This is what's happening in SoBro. New, dramatic views will emerge. Take the shots of Commerce Street, for example. Driving east down Commerce in the 70s, instead of seeing the Renaissance, SunTrust, at&t and onward toward second, you'd have seen low rows of buildings behind Hume-Fogg which included such esteemed clubs like Juanita's, Juniors, and The Jungle and men without dates sitting in cars all along the parking lots. The Sam Davis Hotel, the Greyhound bus station, and the Bowden-Kennedy machine shop building completed the views. The road itself was redirected. As you approached 3rd going east (Commerce was a two-lane road then) the road would curve dramatically in a dogleg as it crossed an alley. At the curve was an old two-story building containing George Jones Possum Holler club at 4th I believe. That's where at&t stands now.

It's all a distant memory now, but one thing that does strike me was my relative lack of concern for the look of the urban landscape, but in retrospect, for those with a penchant for grit, this place was heaven on earth. It was a crazy quilt of quirkiness and contained an amazing collection of characters populating the downtown streets (much more-so than now). For those who are transplants or too young to remember, these are pictures in my head that will never go away and I have a deeply planted appreciation of what downtown Nashville was as much or even more than the appreciation of have for what it is becoming. It was a different place and a different world then. It was a world when concerns for living were much more focused on having air and gas in the car, beer in the hand and not so much whether we had granite counter tops, travertine tile and stainless steel in the kitchens. The amazing thing about it was that we were delighted in the adventure this scary place called downtown was to us. I see myself in a flannel shirt, beer in hand, 8-track blaring Led Zeppelin (or Billy Joel's Piano Man in quieter moments) driving around town in my old beat up '67 Beetle with one headlight and just being in awe that I was a part of that amazing city landscape. I feel like I'm a very lucky man to have seen what I've seen, and now, to see what we're becoming. It's all good. If only I'd had a digital camera then.

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Great pictorial tour Dave! Perhaps we could see another Dave's Nashville come spring? I hope so. :)

The city is changing so fast its hard to look at this pictures and really believe the urban landscape has really changed so much over just a handful of years.

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Brain, there was a series of old warehouses on that plot of land that had just been removed. They were a mess and needed to be gone. While driving around it provided a view I hadn't seen before. I don't think this is the site of The SoBro or for anything I know of. But we can be assured, someday it will be.

In some ways, this reminds me of the days when the land was being cleared for the stadium. As each building went down a new view opened up. This is what's happening in SoBro. New, dramatic views will emerge. Take the shots of Commerce Street, for example. Driving east down Commerce in the 70s, instead of seeing the Renaissance, SunTrust, at&t and onward toward second, you'd have seen low rows of buildings behind Hume-Fogg which included such esteemed clubs like Juanita's, Juniors, and The Jungle and men without dates sitting in cars all along the parking lots. The Sam Davis Hotel, the Greyhound bus station, and the Bowden-Kennedy machine shop building completed the views. The road itself was redirected. As you approached 3rd going east (Commerce was a two-lane road then) the road would curve dramatically in a dogleg as it crossed an alley. At the curve was an old two-story building containing George Jones Possum Holler club at 4th I believe. That's where at&t stands now.

It's all a distant memory now, but one thing that does strike me was my relative lack of concern for the look of the urban landscape, but in retrospect, for those with a penchant for grit, this place was heaven on earth. It was a crazy quilt of quirkiness and contained an amazing collection of characters populating the downtown streets (much more-so than now). For those who are transplants or too young to remember, these are pictures in my head that will never go away and I have a deeply planted appreciation of what downtown Nashville was as much or even more than the appreciation of have for what it is becoming. It was a different place and a different world then. It was a world when concerns for living were much more focused on having air and gas in the car, beer in the hand and not so much whether we had granite counter tops, travertine tile and stainless steel in the kitchens. The amazing thing about it was that we were delighted in the adventure this scary place called downtown was to us. I see myself in a flannel shirt, beer in hand, 8-track blaring Led Zeppelin (or Billy Joel's Piano Man in quieter moments) driving around town in my old beat up '67 Beetle with one headlight and just being in awe that I was a part of that amazing city landscape. I feel like I'm a very lucky man to have seen what I've seen, and now, to see what we're becoming. It's all good. If only I'd had a digital camera then.

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