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I live at 5th and Pine (The Vue) and would also walk over, especially once the new construction on South Graham get's built in. I like a bit of a low key place when I want to watch a game and have some good beer. I liked the ambiance of Dillinger's on Church, but it was too empty during the week and couldn't make it.

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Lifeless to alive in just a couple of years.

on topic but miniaturized... my wife 3d printed a copy of the uptown skyline for me!     Hurst was not ‘Hursted’, but check out those accurately reproduced surface lots! (actually

Per Charlotte Ledger, the land at 4th and Brevard across from CTC sold for $11M.   This is the Norfolk Southern land they were slow to let go of.    I am incredibly excited about this.  White Point Pa

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http://charlotterestauranttraffic.com/news/draught-charlotte-heads-opening-date/#.U9jtiIBdVXA

 

The new bar taking over the Hartigan's space seems like it will be opening soon. I don't think I would ever go there, but it seems nice enough.

I think it looks pretty good!

Wasn't Draft (or Draught) also the tentative name for the beer garden/growler shop going in at S Church & Lincoln? 

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So in walking down College today I noticed a retail space "for lease" that I have never noticed before. It's the space on College St. directly across the street from BLT steak. Seems like pretty prime time real estate, does anyone know if that place is being actively marketed or the history of the space?

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It would seem like pretty prime real estate, but as you note you never noticed it before is the problem with it.   As far as I know it has been there since the Founder's Hall renovation (2 years ago?).

 

 

The garage entrance on the one side and not much of a pedestrian experience on the other makes it 

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It would seem like pretty prime real estate, but as you note you never noticed it before is the problem with it.   As far as I know it has been there since the Founder's Hall renovation (2 years ago?).

 

 

The garage entrance on the one side and not much of a pedestrian experience on the other makes it 

Well that isnt to say if there was something there I wouldnt notice it. Also, Roosters has a garage entrance on one side, they do just fine :whistling::hi:

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Gotta say, I am 100% for this initiative. I have noticed it getting bad lately (I work at that intersection), and it is just not a good look for the city. I am sympathetic towards their plight, but there are programs and areas for it. I am not sure why they only remove them for 30 days, won't they just come back when the benches are? I hope the city gets onboard with this, I couldn't imagine there being that much, if any, opposition.

 

People can say what they want, but having being both a resident and an employee of uptown for over 3 years, I have noticed a shift in the dynamic and feel of uptown. I don't feel as safe as I did 3 years ago and it is beginning to leave a 'sour taste' in my mouth. I hope Charlotte moves in a proper direction to fix the issues. I feel like we, as a city, are on the cusp of a new era for the city with all the new projects, I would hate to see all this good come with the bad in the form of the increase in crime, decrease in perception (due to many more homeless people).

 

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/07/31/5079018/homeless-crowd-at-trade-tryon.html#.U9uWwoBdVXB

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Gotta say, I am 10000% for this initiative. I have noticed it getting bad lately (I work at that intersection), and it is just not a good look for the city. I am sympathetic towards their plight, but there are programs and areas for it. I am not sure why they only remove them for 30 days, won't they just come back when the benches are? I hope the city gets onboard with this, I couldn't imagine there being that much, if any, opposition.

 

People can say what they want, but having being both a resident and an employee of uptown for over 3 years, I have noticed a shift in the dynamic and feel of uptown. I don't feel as safe as I did 3 years ago and it is beginning to leave a 'sour taste' in my mouth. I hope Charlotte moves in a proper direction to fix the issues. I feel like we, as a city, are on the cusp of a new era for the city with all the new projects, we can not let the city be dragged down by something like this, both in perception and function. 

 

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/07/31/5079018/homeless-crowd-at-trade-tryon.html#.U9uWwoBdVXB

I couldn't disagree more. Ramp up enforcement of the actual acts that are issues, but don't punish the people who are simply sitting or sleeping and not causing any problem other than being considered uncomfortable to look at. This is a facet of Charlotte that I really do honestly hate, that this is such a typical, short-sighted and simplistic go-to idea for how to solve a homelessness problem. It won't solve anything, other than displace homeless people into less-trafficked areas where they only become more susceptible to crime and more isolated from the rest of society. As this very article mentions, homelessness is down in the city, yet the shelters still fill up and turn people away. 

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I couldn't disagree more. Ramp up enforcement of the actual acts that are issues, but don't punish the people who are simply sitting or sleeping and not causing any problem other than being considered uncomfortable to look at. This is a facet of Charlotte that I really do honestly hate, that this is such a typical, short-sighted and simplistic go-to idea for how to solve a homelessness problem. It won't solve anything, other than displace homeless people into less-trafficked areas where they only become more susceptible to crime and more isolated from the rest of society. As this very article mentions, homelessness is down in the city, yet the shelters still fill up and turn people away. 

I don't want to get into a fight over here, so we can just agree to disagree. HOWEVER, I will say that I DO agree it is short-sighted and a better solution is to, obviously, provide more beds and resources to get them off the streets, rather than just kick them out. Displacement isn't the long term answer, sure, and yes this city has major issues with seeing the future, but SOMETHING has to be done because honestly, it is getting to be an issue. Ramping up enforcement isn't enough, it just isn't.

 

There's really 3 things going on; less homeless people, more crime and greater visibility of those that are homeless. So while initial displacement fixes the last issue, yes it doesn't fix the other 2 but it is a start. I think it needs to be a multi-pronged attack. Ramp up enforcement, displacement and increase in resources and areas for them. I understand money is everything, but isn't it worth spending the money? If my taxes have to increase in order to increase the funds available to fix this issue, I am in.

 

At the end of the day, perception is EVERYTHING, and if first glance of our main square is "wow there are a lot of homeless people" that is an issue regardless of if they cause trouble or not, that is a problem.

 

Also, one comment I thought was interesting (and I do NOT want to get into a conversion about the hypocrisy of religion but...) there are A TON of churches uptown and didn't it used to be a 'duty' of a church to help the 'non-violent' homeless??? You would think that given the 'beliefs' of these churches they would extend a helping hand.

 

Side note: it could be possible that my own frustration with the issue and the increase in crime in the area I live has clouded my words a bit :dontknow:  :whistling:

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It's clear that a month-long displacement isn't going to solve any problems, and a long-term solution to house these people is needed. But to remove the benches at such a major intersection coupled with the quote in the article about the prospective CEO being scared when he was out for a run smacks of "let's get these people out of uptown so we look better on the surface, who cares where they go as long as it's not in uptown where the public can see them" to me. Thankfully Charlotte hasn't gone the route of other cities by just banning homelessness in a certain area, but it's not unthinkable if their first move is to remove the benches.

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It's clear that a month-long displacement isn't going to solve any problems, and a long-term solution to house these people is needed. But to remove the benches at such a major intersection coupled with the quote in the article about the prospective CEO being scared when he was out for a run smacks of "let's get these people out of uptown so we look better on the surface, who cares where they go as long as it's not in uptown where the public can see them" to me. Thankfully Charlotte hasn't gone the route of other cities by just banning homelessness in a certain area, but it's not unthinkable if their first move is to remove the benches.

Out of curiosity, and maybe it is just my lack of compassion and empathy, but what is the issue with banning in areas? Is it that they just go somewhere else and cause crime there? 

As previously stated, perception is everything....

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It's clear that a month-long displacement isn't going to solve any problems, and a long-term solution to house these people is needed. But to remove the benches at such a major intersection coupled with the quote in the article about the prospective CEO being scared when he was out for a run smacks of "let's get these people out of uptown so we look better on the surface, who cares where they go as long as it's not in uptown where the public can see them" to me. Thankfully Charlotte hasn't gone the route of other cities by just banning homelessness in a certain area, but it's not unthinkable if their first move is to remove the benches.

 

I think Charlotte is pretty compassionate to the homeless compared to other cities of comparable size.  I remember an article a year or so ago about two officers they have that visit the camps to ensure safety of our displaced citizens.  It's a far better approach than just arresting the same folks every week or so if they were to be banned.

 

And prepare for this reach I'm about to make but what if the benches weren't there and the CEO brought those 1,000 jobs to Charlotte.  The taxes those employee's pay could go to public programs to help the homeless.  Again, it's a stretch but perception at the most prominent intersection of our city should accurately reflect what living in Charlotte is like.  Which is not a city with a rampant homeless problem.

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Out of curiosity, and maybe it is just my lack of compassion and empathy, but what is the issue with banning in areas? Is it that they just go somewhere else and cause crime there? As previously stated, perception is everything....

The perception of Charlotte, forever, had been "clean and bland". I've never heard anyone complain about our homeless, not have I ever felt uncomfortable around them. If anything, I'd say we have some of the most passive homeless populations of any major city in the United States, at least from my own experiences.

The honest truth is this; we aren't little old Charlotte anymore. Becoming a true big city has it's good (shiny towers! Mass transit! Unique restaurants and bars!) and it's bad (crime! Traffic! Pollution! Homeless!). I'd say, in Charlotte's case, we do an awesome job promoting the good and a pretty damn good job managing those bad components.

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Out of curiosity, and maybe it is just my lack of compassion and empathy, but what is the issue with banning in areas? Is it that they just go somewhere else and cause crime there? If it is an argument of: 1. ban in uptown and make uptown look shiny, but another (lesser area) suffers the consequences VS 2. have no ban and its spread out but the look & feel (and increase in crime) of uptown suffers. I'm sorry but I vote option 1, 10 times out of 10.

 

As previously stated, perception is everything....

 

 

I think Charlotte is pretty compassionate to the homeless compared to other cities of comparable size.  I remember an article a year or so ago about two officers they have that visit the camps to ensure safety of our displaced citizens.  It's a far better approach than just arresting the same folks every week or so if they were to be banned.

 

And prepare for this reach I'm about to make but what if the benches weren't there and the CEO brought those 1,000 jobs to Charlotte.  The taxes those employee's pay could go to public programs to help the homeless.  Again, it's a stretch but perception at the most prominent intersection of our city should accurately reflect what living in Charlotte is like.  Which is not a city with a rampant homeless problem.

 

I'm not saying removing the benches is wrong on its own, but I do think that if it turns into a plan to just move the homeless off somewhere less public, that's wrong. Just moving them doesn't solve any problems and may even make the problem worse because it's easier to ignore. Besides that it's another example of growing classism, etc. But I'm kind of a bleeding-heart liberal, so take what I say with a grain of salt... I've always thought the homeless population in Charlotte seem pretty polite for a major city, and I think if we're going to dream of becoming a world-class city we're going to have to take some of the dirtiness that comes with that.

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The perception of Charlotte, forever, had been "clean and bland". I've never heard anyone complain about our homeless, not have I ever felt uncomfortable around them. If anything, I'd say we have some of the most passive homeless populations of any major city in the United States, at least from my own experiences.

The honest truth is this; we aren't little old Charlotte anymore. Becoming a true big city has it's good (shiny towers! Mass transit! Unique restaurants and bars!) and it's bad (crime! Traffic! Pollution! Homeless!). I'd say, in Charlotte's case, we do an awesome job promoting the good and a pretty damn good job managing those bad components.

Okay, that is fair enough, and again it could be my frustration with my own feeling of uptown seeming less safe. I guess coming from Cleveland I should be used to crime and homeless people. I guess I would rather be "clean and bland" than "dirty and exciting" 

 

Just moving them doesn't solve any problems and may even make the problem worse because it's easier to ignore. 

Also true. I can see I am not going to get much agreement soooooo I'm gonna go ahead and just go back to posting articles on new buildings and projects, and commenting on how I wish there were more themed bars uptown  :whistling:

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Everything is relative. Prior coming to Charlotte I lived and worked in Chicago downtown for two years. And frankly I was sick and tired of homeless people begging on every corner and some of them even demanding money from me. I understand that it is a huge issue and visibility of homeless people is required for people to take action. But at some point it is too much and some people just don't want to do anything to improve their life. 

 

In Charlotte there is much less opportunities for work and entertainment, but I appreciate how clean it is. I don't mind seeing couple homeless people in the Uptown center sitting on benches.

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I will throw in my $.02 as a worker right at the corner of Trade & Tryon -

 

Over the past few months, there has been a very significant uptick in the number of homeless at the square. Almost shockingly so. Especially during the home rush, virtually every bench will have homeless crowds. Yesterday afternoon I met a contractor on the sidewalk in front of our building and there was a powerful smell of urine. 

 

The liberal urbanite inside me cringes, but I actually do think removing the benches is a reasonable compromise for now. I do think it causes major perception issues for both economic recruiting and tourism, and in the long run that will only hurt CLT as a whole. I also think removing the benches is much more palatable than the god awful "homeless spikes" that some cities are installing at common sleeping spots.

 

It sure as hell isn't a permanent solution though. 

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Okay, that is fair enough, and again it could be my frustration with my own feeling of uptown seeming less safe. I guess coming from Cleveland I should be used to crime and homeless people. I guess I would rather be "clean and bland" than "dirty and exciting" 

 

Also true. I can see I am not going to get much agreement soooooo I'm gonna go ahead and just go back to posting articles on new buildings and projects, and commenting on how I wish there were more themed bars uptown  :whistling:

 

Ha the two posters coming out in favor of moving the benches are from Cleveland.  We like our clean new city :)

 

In all seriousness though, I've witnessed some pretty aggressive panhandling back home and have not seen anything like that in Charlotte yet.  I am in favor of nipping it in the bud as people in that article have said homeless were getting more aggressive in recent memory versus what they've witnessed in past years.  I think those statements are what drove me to the support of removing benches temporarily to see how it changes recent perception.

 

And back to posting about development/new places to eat or drink with Jayvee...  :whistling:

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I will throw in my $.02 as a worker right at the corner of Trade & Tryon -

 

Over the past few months, there has been a very significant uptick in the number of homeless at the square. Almost shockingly so. Especially during the home rush, virtually every bench will have homeless crowds. Yesterday afternoon I met a contractor on the sidewalk in front of our building and there was a powerful smell of urine. 

 

The liberal urbanite inside me cringes, but I actually do think removing the benches is a reasonable compromise for now. I do think it causes major perception issues for both economic recruiting and tourism, and in the long run that will only hurt CLT as a whole. I also think removing the benches is much more palatable than the god awful "homeless spikes" that some cities are installing at common sleeping spots.

 

It sure as hell isn't a permanent solution though. 

You said it much more politically than I did...sooo.... ^^^^ yeah that.

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I will throw in my $.02 as a worker right at the corner of Trade & Tryon -

 

Over the past few months, there has been a very significant uptick in the number of homeless at the square. Almost shockingly so. Especially during the home rush, virtually every bench will have homeless crowds. Yesterday afternoon I met a contractor on the sidewalk in front of our building and there was a powerful smell of urine. 

 

The liberal urbanite inside me cringes, but I actually do think removing the benches is a reasonable compromise for now. I do think it causes major perception issues for both economic recruiting and tourism, and in the long run that will only hurt CLT as a whole. I also think removing the benches is much more palatable than the god awful "homeless spikes" that some cities are installing at common sleeping spots.

 

It sure as hell isn't a permanent solution though. 

I haven't noticed the uptick myself, and not sure I would since when I lived uptown I was about 1 block from the primary homeless hangout on N. Tryon, but if there is a consensus that there has been a dramatic increase at the square despite overall homelessness being slightly down, there must be a reason. Has any displacement occurred on N. Tryon? Are the shelters having more trouble than they were a few months ago? Are there more tourists, giving panhandlers more success at the square? As long as I've lived here there have been people sleeping on the benches around the square, but large congregations have been rare. I agree that perception is important, and the square definitely should be a priority for fixing the issue, but I find the removal of benches to still be a rather insensitive solution and only one step above the spikes that some cities have installed.

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The problems with the homeless are not going to get better unless the communities that are impacted started looking at the underlying reason of why it's happening. I have to admit that the homelessness in a some of fasted growing cities, especially in the Southeast, is growing more dire every day. But we can't turn a blind eye to it. Here in Greenville (SC) we have documented cases of homeless people being bused into the city EVERYDAY from all over the country. Some from as far away as the West coast and North as Minnesota and Wisconsin. YES! I will say that it get on my nerves to see them begging for money and sleeping on benches and sidewalks. And like there in Charlotte, they pick prime real estate downtown to do all these things. And once again like Charlotte, we are at a turning point where companies are relocating HQ's like the recent Sealed Air move (where they looked at both cities before choosing Charlotte), we are trying to put our best foot forward. Someone above said why not just ban the homeless in particular places or areas, like downtowns. Well look at the backlash Columbia (SC) had when they proposes that idea. By the way I'm thinking it could be against the law or unconstitutional to ban any law abiding citizen to be in any public place. I am no law scholar. Here in Greenville there is a large homeless population and we know it. Most live in an area we locals call Tent City, Underneath a bridge here on the Westside. Similar to one underneath an interstate bridge in Atlanta. We have to figure out creative ways to fix the problem. Some folks with Greenville County and the City of Greenville in association with non-profits in the area are looking at a program that is going on in Nashville. That program takes care of the immediate need, which is housing, then with the help of the non-profit takes care of the underlying issues. Which could be drug abuse, education, transportation, etc....... Pushing these people out of sight. Should not push these people out of mind.

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