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kayman

Birmingham 'Intown' Neighborhood Revitalization

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Fountain Heights home construction pushed to early 2007

A major part of the revivalization of Fountain Heights that included the construction of 25 single-family residences is going to be delayed. The contractor has opted out due to being overwhelmed by the project. The project is part of an initiative that was started back in the late 90's to total revival the Fountain Heights neighborhood under Richard Arlington.

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Fountain Heights home construction pushed to early 2007

A major part of the revivalization of Fountain Heights that included the construction of 25 single-family residences is going to be delayed. The contractor has opted out due to being overwhelmed by the project. The project is part of an initiative that was started back in the late 90's to total revival the Fountain Heights neighborhood under Richard Arlington.

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There is a forum being held today that discusses the farther redevelopment of Norwood, Druid Hills, and Central City areas of North Birmingham. This forum includes the International Economic Development Council along with 50 officials from here to discuss way how to steamline the redevelopment of that area. They will be a final report issued this spring about these areas.

Forum eyes new life for neighborhoods

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Older Homes in Bush Hills get refurbished

Newly renovated homes aimed at middle class families

The Red Iron Housing Development Company, a company formed by Housing Enterprise of Central Alabama and Housing Fund of Central Alabama, has recently renovated and refurbished in the Bush Hills neighborhood. They recently held an open house for the vintage houses that now range in price from $150,000-$175,000 after the vast improvements. The main target income range for these homes are those who annual income range $35K-$55K. Other projects by Red Iron includes the Forest Park-South Avondale neighborhood apartment complexed called Forest Park Terrance. This company is making a citywide effort to rehabilitate and refurbish living quarters to more competitve and modern standards that includes upgrading the electrical system, installing central air conditioning, a new kitchen, a sump pump system in basement and adding a new den and bathroom in the basement. Along with new flooring and carpeting and light fixtures were installed where needed.

This alone is another sign that the western area of Birmingham is starting to make a comeback like the East and Southside has in recent years.

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It really is great to hear about renovation on the west side. About how many homes are being renovated?

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'Intown' Neighborhoods

Still good, in transition and potential for comeback

Crestline has remained a great neighborhood for several decades. You know the type, Mtnbrook obviously. Pockets of neighborhoods where homes are still mostly owner occupied and folks keep their homes up pretty well.

- What are the intown neighborhoods like this that have held their values?

- Which ones are in transition from good to bad, and bad to good? (If bad to good, what's needed to push it over the edge? If good to bad, what's needed to bring it back?)

- Which nieghborhoods have the potential (character in architecture and/or approaching historic stature, 30+ years old) to be revitalized and what would it take?

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Crestline has remained a great neighborhood for several decades. You know the type, Mtnbrook obviously. Pockets of neighborhoods where homes are still mostly owner occupied and folks keep their homes up pretty well.

- What are the intown neighborhoods like this that have held their values?

- Which ones are in transition from good to bad, and bad to good? (If bad to good, what's needed to push it over the edge? If good to bad, what's needed to bring it back?)

- Which nieghborhoods have the potential (character in architecture and/or approaching historic stature, 30+ years old) to be revitalized and what would it take?

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The Fountain Heights and Glen Iris area overall has maintained itself pretty well with numerous well kept homes and lawns. The Titusville is trying to make a comeback, but it really needs a much better development other than that proposed Wal-Mart for the former Trinity Steel site.

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Does anyone have any updates on neighborhood revitalization efforts? I think a strength of revitalization lies in the historic core communities near downtown, (Norwood, Avondale, Bush Hills near Birmingham-Southern, Fountain Heights, Woodlawn, etc...). There is so much potential stored in each of these areas. I think with their easy access to downtown B'ham and the potential that is there, each of these areas could soon become a desired location to anyone looking to get closer to the city center. The revitalization of these core areas would be great counterparts to the revitalization that is taking place in downtown Birmingham. I remember seeing the link below about Norwood some time back, but I am not sure as to how the city-wide revitalization efforts are coming along.

http://www.historicnorwood.com/

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To my knowledge, the neighborhood revitalization plans are mainly tied to the revitalizations of commercial districts with Main Street Birmingham. The areas targeted by this program are Avondale, East Lake, Ensley, Lomb Avenue, North Birmingham, Parkway East, Titusville, Tuscaloosa Avenue, and Woodlawn.

The Northside Weed-and-Seed program has helped Norwood and Fountain Heights quite a bit with reducing their crime levels, and Fountain Heights has some solid revitalization on the books since '99. However, beyond that I don't know of anything for that area. Collegeville is the main area with a lot of press to go along with it for revitalization involving the New Bethel Baptist Church being considered a historical landmark and the center of the neighborhood rejuvenation. Avondale has a site also, http://www.avondalebiz.com/, however it is mostly surround commercial revitalization also. I guess they are trying to revitalization the commercial districts first, and then the layout of plans for entire community revitalization will come afterwards, like the creation of Lakeview district near St. Vincent Hospital, which it and its surround area are now a real estate hotbed.

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Our mayor has proposed major revitalization projects in Collegeville and Five Points West. One assumes he's not done dreaming yet.

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Our mayor has proposed major revitalization projects in Collegeville and Five Points West. One assumes he's not done dreaming yet.

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I am very happy to hear that revitalization efforts are taking place in these areas. I grew up in the North Birmingham area, near Collegeville, so I am especially happy to hear about efforts in that area, even though it was unexpected to me. :thumbsup:

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I am very happy to hear that revitalization efforts are taking place in these areas. I grew up in the North Birmingham area, near Collegeville, so I am especially happy to hear about efforts in that area, even though it was unexpected to me. :thumbsup:

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See, now this is how rumors get started. I said that revitalization projects had been PROPOSED and you repeated that they were TAKING PLACE. Those are two entirely different things, even in LaLa Land.

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