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BrandonTO416

Nashville urban housing construction

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BrandonTO416    77

Here is what has been proposed/is under construction this spring.

1) Viridian

http://www.viridiannashville.com/

ViridianChurchSt-022504.gif

This project is the first major downtown condo in Nashville, with an urban grocery store in the base. It should revolutionize Nashville's housing market. Its going to be 31 stories tall, and is slated to have both affordable condos in the $100k range all the way up to million dollar penthouses.

2) Harrison Lofts downtown

HarrisonLofts1.jpg

These will be 3 towers by the riverfront beside downtown.

3) West End Loft II

http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cf...s&news_id=25312

0804condo.jpg

This project started in August 2003, and is set to finish this summer.

In front of the lofts lies a series of townhouses... Here is a photo taken a while back of the almost completed townhouses:

Row32.jpg

4) Bristol on Broadway

http://www.thebristolonbroadway.com

Rendering:

tbob_lrg.jpg

This seems to be a nice idea, but I wonder how much it costs. No prices are listed anywhere that I can tell.

5) Lofts @ Werthan Mills

WerthanRen1.jpg

6) The Bristol on Woodland

http://www.thebristolonwoodland.com/

tbow_lrg.jpg

From the same company doing the Bristol on Broadway.

MidCondos1.jpg

7) Going up at 18th St. Hopefully these will actually be affordable.

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Allan    0

It looks like there are a lot of nice projects in the works. My favorite is the first one. It should make a large impact on downtown Nashville. If this project is a success, more projects like it will follow.

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bobliocatt    0

that looks like a great set of projects to help densify and urbanize inner city Nashville. It looks like every city is seeing some form of new urban residential developments.

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BrandonTO416    77

Yea, there are more then enough people. They could probably build several thousand more housing complexes in the city. The problem is that there isn't transit and things aren't very cohesive just yet.

Its too little, too late as far as I'm concerned. But its good to see what IS happening is happening.

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rocket9561    0

Is there really that much movement back into Nashville to support these projects?

Yes. It's a nationwide trend I believe.

One only has to look at the restoration of historic inner city neighborhoods like Germantown and Lockeland Springs to see that people are moving into the central city. Even the mayor lives there. Plus most of these developments have to meet a lease requirement before they begin construction and many of these are already approved or u/c. The influx of new residents has spurred the development of a major downtown Grocery (H.G. Hills) and the 2nd urban grocery store in the city. (Harris Teeter in Hillsboro Village was the first) Once Rolling Mill Hill gets started Nashville will have a nice downtown community with a healthy mix of retail, residential, entertainment, and business.

An article on the boom..

Lookin' pretty in the city

By LINDA BRYANT

Staff Writer

Building company Trace Ventures recognized for pair of neighborhood improvement projects

HILLSBORO-WEST END

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BrandonTO416    77

Nashville is part of the fastest growing of southern cities, so I don't see this type of development stalling anytime soon.

Its just I wished there would be even more considering the amount of growth metro-wide. You guys realize these units add up to barely few thousand units. If 250,000 more people flow into greater Nashville this decade as they did last - then there should be 20,000 new housing units added to the downtown and West End regions in my opinion. Of course I'm a bona fide pro-urbanist.

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Ivory Tower    0

OOOH! NICE!

Row32.jpg

Ya know, Nashville I believe already has more city population than Atlanta.

Once the skyline and transit system catches up, Nashville will then be the jewel of the south.

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Ivory Tower    0

Nashville does have a larger city population.

If the skyline and transit system were to catch up, how could it not pass up Atlanta ????

It also has the country music industry and is a port city to boot.

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DallasTexan    0

Okay, let me break it down for you in simple terms.

1. Yes, Nashville has a larger population than Atlanta - 545,000 vs. 423,000...

BUT, it is larger only on paper.

Why, you ask?

The city limits of Nashville encompass FIVE HUNDRED FIFTY square miles. Atlanta stands at only 134 square miles, so that obviously explains why Nashville is larger.

Metropolitan areas are a MUCH better indication of population:

Atlanta: 4,800,000

Nashville: 1,300,000

2. Transit in Nashville?

HAR! Please. Atlanta has had a HEAVY rail system since 1974. It also has a SERIOUS proposal for a light rail beltline, which will connect the entire city with rail transit..

Nashville? Well, it has nothing. All of our transit proposals have been beaten down by the populace or shelved for years. The only infrastructure work we're doing right now is widening all of our interstates to twelve lanes.

3. Skyline?

Not. Even. Close. As I sit here atop my 24th floor perch in the Sheraton Midtown at Colony Square, I know that Nashville will NEVER even come close to looking like Atlanta -- not even Midtown alone.

Here's a comparison: As of today, Nashville has 52 completed skyscrapers over 12 floors, 4 proposed, and 0 under construction. Atlanta has 187 completed, 4 approved, 22 proposed, and 7 under construction. This doesn't even count the cities outside of the city limits that have skylines themselves (ie: Vinings, Sandy Springs, et. al).

4. Country Music Industry?

Okay, country has been on the decline for years. Also, most of the decisions are now made in either New York or Los Angeles. Lastly, Nashville HATES that it is home to country music, unless the industry is giving the city something.

5. Port City?

Um, on the Cumberland? LOL! We do have a lot of distribution centers (ie: warehouses) but we're certainly not a big port city.

I rest my case. The prosection may continue with cross examination.

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Ivory Tower    0

Yes, you got me on density and metro population.

Look at Phoenix or Dallas for example, they are sprawled to some degree, but due to population, transit and skyline(Dallas anyhow), most consider them big league citys.

Let me restate, if the skyline could catch up,which could be possible, cause ya never know how things could shift in the future.

Some people probably would have never thought Nashville to reach todays level.

Transit is always a possability.

No, not a major port, but a port none the less.

And you can never tell how the port industry in the city might grow in the future.

Yes, Music city, regardless of what you say, the city will always be Nashvegas, and economical wise(large or moderate) it's a plus.

So like I've said, let Nashville work on a couple things and it would surpass Atlanta.

I think you are comparing present conditions anyways.

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DallasTexan    0

Oh Lord... Do I have my work cut out for me or what?

So... What part of Nashville do you live in? Isn't it the best city EVER? I see you have succumbed to the famed Nashville boosterism.

Anyways...

Look at Phoenix or Dallas for example, they are sprawled to some degree, but due to population, transit and skyline(Dallas anyhow), most consider them big league citys.

Dallas has six million people. Nashville just crossed into one million territory. That's why Dallas is considered major.

Let me restate, if the skyline could catch up,which could be possible, cause ya never know how things could shift in the future.

I would bet my personal fortune that this statement is false.

Why?

1. Nashville will never experience the same rapid growth as Atlanta.

2. The era of skyscraper construction (50s-80s) has passed - skyscrapers just aren't as in vogue in this day and age as they were in previous decades.

Some people probably would have never thought Nashville to reach todays level.

It was to be expected, since Nashville is in the booming Sunbelt. You are aware that Nashville's population has stayed flat since 2000 though, aren't you?

Transit is always a possability

When? 2525?

No, not a major port, but a port none the less.

And you can never tell how the port industry in the city might grow in the future.

Where's the port? There is no port in Nashville. :ph34r:

So like I've said, let Nashville work on a couple things and it would surpass Atlanta.

When? I think the human race will have destroyed itself by the time that chance happens...

I think you are comparing present conditions anyways.

Um, yes. I live in the present. I'm comparing both cities current growth and development patterns, because that shows what the two will be like in the future. There is not going to be a huge paradigm shift in either city's train of thought, either, so I doubt a massive change will occur that catapults Nashville ahead of Atlanta anytime soon.

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Justin, you make good points, but I don't see the relevance of any of this, but these forums seem to insist on the persistance of the big dog, little dog syndrome. What's Atlanta got to do with the city of Nashville and what it becomes anyway? Why must cities always compare, or be compared with somewhere else with regard to the overused size syndrome. I love Nashville. I've lived in this city most of my nearly 52 years. Big port city? No. Important river traffic? To our degree, yes. Skyscrapers like Atlanta has now? Not in many lifetimes. Music? Yes, it's extremely important. People ashamed of the industry? You couldn't come up with enough questions or answers to fully address those who are proud of our musical heritage and those who aren't. Doing so would prove utter shallowness of understanding. Don't even try to dissect this, it's not possible here. And being connected to the music industry as a child does in no way connect you to the heart of a community in which you've never blended. Privileged lives create social blindness.

I live here, I work here, my family is here, my history is here, my friends are here. If I were to spend my days and nights lamenting over what we don't have, or what other cities have we don't, I'd be one miserable man. Instead, when I go outside, when I drive around, when I do what makes me happy, I see a virbrant city, full of creative and forward-thinking people. I can ignore the idiots, the scum, the down and out, the backward thinking and bigoted subsets of populations that exist within EVERY major collection of people. It's my right, it's my choice. I don't have to move them to the forefront of my life and ridicule them. Why would I, anyway?

As I move around my city, of course I see things that could be better, but contained within that skin of wholeness, I see things that make me know I don't want to live anywhere else. I don't want to miss the metamorphosis of a city who's proud of its history, its heritage, it's future. In many ways, we are indeed behind others in some ways, but way ahead in some others.

At the end of the day, I'm proud to be a Nashvillian. I'm proud to live within a community of people who possess much-lauded compassion for others, friendliness and neighborliness, positive outlooks of place, more things to do than I could ever pursue, a beautiful topography with some of Tennessee's most beautiful countryside within an arm's reach and a short drive, and just as importantly, grand plans for this grand old city which will indeed make us happy and proud.

So, cut the crap, Justin. Stop looking at my world as your personal dart board. You're a smart man, but with limited scope and limited credibility. Looking at the world through the window of a fancy penthouse hotel room with fat pocket doesn't give you much truth in life. And don't throw that "poor me, bad things happened to me crap" onto the table. You're not the only one who's had slaps of reality thrown at them. Maybe you should put a hold on the bank account for a while and get out here with the rest of us and grunt through life and really see what it means to exist on your own. Then, maybe you can participate in a civic discussion without all your insecurities clouding the issues important to us. You and your cronies are just children of presumed entitlement who wrongly think your opinions are spun with gold.

To me, you're just brats. Having met you and talked with you as much as I have, I realize you have the potential to be a good member of humanity and I really like you. But, the sooner you get a handle on the fact that other people actually share this life with you and have the right to be proud of where they live, the better. As you continue to grow up, realize this, even Superman knew better than to piss into the wind. Try feeling better about yourself, let that Justin charm lead the way. You'll be amazed how far it will take you. You're an embryo in this life. Shed the scars now. They'll itch you to death if you don't.

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DallasTexan    0

Dave, you've read FAR too much into my comments. The relevance in my reply is that a forumer stated that Nashville could easily one day dominate over Atlanta -- of which, I let him know that that would be very unrealistic.

If a Birmingham, Charlotte, or Raleigh forumer had said that one day their city would surpass Atlanta as the dominant city in the South, I would have had the same reply. Nashville's not special, nor have I ridiculed the city. I wasn't comparing them on a versus level, either - I was just stating the facts as to why Nashville could never surpass Atlanta.

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Ivory Tower    0

We know how many people Dallas has.

Read again and you will see that I was talking about density, which you brought up.

The fact that some places with sprawling populations are still considered major citys due to skyline, transit and industry.

All it takes is one shift in growth for Nashville and slump for Atlanta.

This has been proven in the last 50 years.

Once Nashville shifts to just one higher gear in growth, skyline,transit and port industry will grow by default.

If this economical shift would last long enough for both citys, Nashville could very well take over Atlanta in the next generation.

You have made up your mind that CAN'T happen, and that is unrealistic.

I'm not trying to dog Atlanta, just saying that it is possible.

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DallasTexan    0

Um, what would make Atlanta slump? There is no indication of the city slowing down anytime soon. Thinking OTHERWISE is unrealistic.

Even if that DID happen, I have two questions for you.

1. If the economic capital and population center of the Southeast went into a slump, wouldn't it bring other Southern cities (including Nashville) down with it? Atlanta effects the entire region.

2. Even if Nashville and other cities weren't affected by a downfall in Atlanta, why would Nashville replace Atlanta as the dominant city in the region? Why not Memphis? Charlotte? Afterall, they are booming as well. What makes Nashville special to you?

Seriously... this is the worst case of boosterism I've seen in awhile.

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Ivory Tower    0

:lol::lol::lol: Oh geez dude, chill out and take a deep breath.

Hell man, I don't know what could cause a slump.

Pick a reason ;)

It is quite possible for a city to have a slump without affecting every city within a 400 mile radius :lol::lol::lol:

And yes, Charlotte could be the city instead, but I was talking about Nashville.

Which Nashvegas would most likely have the better chance I would think.

Memphis ? :lol::lol::lol:

boosterism ? :lol:

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DallasTexan    0

It is quite possible for a city to have a slump without affecting every city within a 400 mile radius
Why not? The only reason Atlanta would stop booming is if the entire Sunbelt region became undesirable, much like the Northeast and Midwest did in the 1960s -- which would result in most cities in the region to decline.

Which Nashvegas would most likely have the better chance I would think.

Why would we have a better chance? Our corporate presence is lacking versus other major Southern cities. We aren't developing transit. What gives us the "edge?"

I see someone doesn't like serious debate. Don't like facts?

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Ivory Tower    0

I like a debate untill the next person starts getting waay to uptight about it.

I didn't say it wasn't possible, but it is also possible the otherway.

Look, like I said, just take a pill, take a deep breath and enjoy life.

It's just a discussion board about citys for gods sake.

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Guest donaltopablo   
Guest donaltopablo

Alright, as an Atlantan forum any city can take the lead as the capital of the SE (or whatever titles you want to assign it). Just makes us targets for comments on forums, LOL!

It's possible in time that many cities could eventually over take Atlanta. There are a million factors to play into this. Loss of appeal, high housing costs, high cost of doing business, age, crime, traffic. None of these involve the economic structure of the SE falling apart causing decline in any other city, nor does it require some twist of fate or magic for another city to surpass it. Just remember, 50 years ago, BHam city and metro were bigger than Atlanta. Things change rapidly.

With that being said, it's a pointless arguement and I don't want it to get out of hand. Please go back on topic and leave this one alone.

DallasTexan - if you want to know where he lives, ask him through PM. This thread is suppose to be about infill/redevelopment in Nashville, not where people live or whether Nashville is going to over take anyone else.

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DallasTexan    0

Well, Paul, you know I couldn't resist replying to a comment like that. It was just too easy, you know. :lol:

I do see your point - Things do change, but going by what has happened in the past fifty years, I doubt anything will change soon.

Who knows though? I could destroy Atlanta tomorrow ;)

As for Birmingham, well, city leaders fudgeed it over in the 50s and that's why it isn't the dominant city in the South now.

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