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SUSAstudent

Harding Blvd/ North Baton Rouge

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It seems to me that the Metro Airport/Harding Blvd/Southern University area is SEVERELY under developed. I understand that it may be considered a bad area, but to my understanding, the area surrounding LSU is also. Although I feel the construction and development around LSU is necessary, considering that there are 30,000 plus students living in that area, but I dont see why SU students have to travel to Baker or College Dr JUST to make groceries, there are no apartment complexes around for the student's convenience, hell you have to travel JUST to get sumthing to eat late at night.

Harding Boulevard is a great location . . TO ME (lol). . .for a grocery store, small strip shopping center, affordable housing for students. .etc. . .WHATS THE PROBLEM BATON ROUGE? Are we so stuck on developing downtown (which. . to me. . . is GREATLY in need of), and stuffing and squeezing stuff on already over developed Bluebonnet, that we cant even provide convenience to our college students? Aside from LSU and their 35,000 students, Southern University is PACKED with about 12,000 students everyday, and throughout the day, all 12,000 of us are trying to shop, eat, hell just hang out. . but unfortunately, that's not provided to us. . . maybe later, I suppose . . lol

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Crime and money.

It's the two factors considered when developers want to build something.

As for "provided to us"....there's a lot wrong with that. Nothing is provided to anyone. Businesses look at the bottom line, and that is the end of the story. If there is a market that you see for something in your area that some business isn't taking advantage of, then maybe you should put something together yourself.

Howell Place is a start for the area (even if the developer isn't from the area), but the fact is that the crime in that area is high and the income is low, so any retail development would have to be a regional thing with an anchor that draws people in from the entire North Baton Rouge region. A movie theater anchoring a power center would be a good thing. I think that would start a chain effect that would drive more traffic and more business into the area, which would drive higher income residents into the area....and so on. There is little to no local investment as it is, which causes a problem when trying to attract the big fish. There needs to be North Baton Rouge owned businesses first...that will attract the big fish.

You'd still have to worry about crime. It seems like some people, while they don't steal or commit crimes, tend to condone it for some pathetic excuse ("I don't want to put another child in jail"....or "they are not stealing from me, so I don't care"). If your neighborhood condones it, then you might as well move away and never look back. That's the same mentality that goes with the business world. You can't do business in a part of town where your neighbors turn their heads when you are away. It hurts property values which drives people with money away...and that drives retailers away.

That being said.....If you want a grocery store or some kind of outlet in your area, then build one yourself. Much of the development in south baton rouge is done by people from south baton rouge. Now, the area is full of developments undertaken by out of town firms...but it started with those local dollars.

Don't blame or rant because someone from out of town doesn't want to invest in an area where the people who live there don't even want to invest.

America's most successful businesses were started because they supply an something that was obviously needed (an easy solution), but no one saw it or no one cared.

20 years ago LSU didn't have much of anything around except for locals investing into the area. Chimes street and areas immediately north or south of campus was primarily local merchants and establishments. Tigertown is all locally owned.

Now, you have Walk Ons, Pluckers, and a million other developments from folks with ties to Baton Rouge but no longer live here...which draws more development from out of town (RW Day).

So, if Southern wants something, the first and best place to rant to is distinguished alumni that may want to give something back. You have to have local investment before you have the big, high dollar developers in the area, and like I said, if the locals don't care then you can't expect anyone else to. In my opinion as an LSU graduate, Southern has a lot of pride in their school....but I just don't see enough local owners developing or investing in the area...and if these graduates are doing so well, then why don't they give something back.

Maybe Howell Place will start a trend. Who knows? So far, only a medical clinic and a distribution center....but maybe in the future a theater or something.

SUSAstudent, maybe you should put something together and start a business...like a burger joint or something. It might grow into the next Chimes. I can tell you have vision. If more people in your area have the vision, then get some investors and start your own thing.

Raising Canes started out like that. No one knew that that would catch on.....I mean, 12 years ago, I'd have reacted to the first Raising Canes with something like "wow, another chicken finger fast food joint, how original"....but I would have been wrong.

No kidding, a decent liquor store that is open late would do well around any campus. Green's purple and gold already thought of that (I think it was Kobe's before).

The idea that "someone" should do something is wrong. "I" should do something is the right reaction, and that is the reaction that the locals around Southern should have.

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Crime and money.

It's the two factors considered when developers want to build something.

As for "provided to us"....there's a lot wrong with that. Nothing is provided to anyone. Businesses look at the bottom line, and that is the end of the story. If there is a market that you see for something in your area that some business isn't taking advantage of, then maybe you should put something together yourself.

Howell Place is a start for the area (even if the developer isn't from the area), but the fact is that the crime in that area is high and the income is low, so any retail development would have to be a regional thing with an anchor that draws people in from the entire North Baton Rouge region. A movie theater anchoring a power center would be a good thing. I think that would start a chain effect that would drive more traffic and more business into the area, which would drive higher income residents into the area....and so on. There is little to no local investment as it is, which causes a problem when trying to attract the big fish. There needs to be North Baton Rouge owned businesses first...that will attract the big fish.

You'd still have to worry about crime. It seems like some people, while they don't steal or commit crimes, tend to condone it for some pathetic excuse ("I don't want to put another child in jail"....or "they are not stealing from me, so I don't care"). If your neighborhood condones it, then you might as well move away and never look back. That's the same mentality that goes with the business world. You can't do business in a part of town where your neighbors turn their heads when you are away. It hurts property values which drives people with money away...and that drives retailers away.

That being said.....If you want a grocery store or some kind of outlet in your area, then build one yourself. Much of the development in south baton rouge is done by people from south baton rouge. Now, the area is full of developments undertaken by out of town firms...but it started with those local dollars.

Don't blame or rant because someone from out of town doesn't want to invest in an area where the people who live there don't even want to invest.

America's most successful businesses were started because they supply an something that was obviously needed (an easy solution), but no one saw it or no one cared.

20 years ago LSU didn't have much of anything around except for locals investing into the area. Chimes street and areas immediately north or south of campus was primarily local merchants and establishments. Tigertown is all locally owned.

Now, you have Walk Ons, Pluckers, and a million other developments from folks with ties to Baton Rouge but no longer live here...which draws more development from out of town (RW Day).

So, if Southern wants something, the first and best place to rant to is distinguished alumni that may want to give something back. You have to have local investment before you have the big, high dollar developers in the area, and like I said, if the locals don't care then you can't expect anyone else to. In my opinion as an LSU graduate, Southern has a lot of pride in their school....but I just don't see enough local owners developing or investing in the area...and if these graduates are doing so well, then why don't they give something back.

Maybe Howell Place will start a trend. Who knows? So far, only a medical clinic and a distribution center....but maybe in the future a theater or something.

SUSAstudent, maybe you should put something together and start a business...like a burger joint or something. It might grow into the next Chimes. I can tell you have vision. If more people in your area have the vision, then get some investors and start your own thing.

Raising Canes started out like that. No one knew that that would catch on.....I mean, 12 years ago, I'd have reacted to the first Raising Canes with something like "wow, another chicken finger fast food joint, how original"....but I would have been wrong.

No kidding, a decent liquor store that is open late would do well around any campus. Green's purple and gold already thought of that (I think it was Kobe's before).

The idea that "someone" should do something is wrong. "I" should do something is the right reaction, and that is the reaction that the locals around Southern should have.

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Money is not the problem. There's plenty of money in and around the Scotlandville community. SUSA, you are not old enough to remember this, but there was a time when Scottland Ave. was bustling with the very businesses you would like to see. Grocery stores, movie theatres, restaurants, auto repair, doctors, dentists, etc. Unfortunately, back in the late 60's/early 70's at the end of segregation, a lot of that went away. The residents of Scotlandville went down Airline, Plank Rd, Florida Blvd and other areas to do business. This killed the local business community.

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See that's the problem to me. There's a neighborhood on the left of Harding (coming from Southern) called Southern Heights. 90%of all the residents in this neighborhood graduated from Southern, but I dont understand how they can be so nonchalant about the status of this area .. .. I'm a student here at SUSA, about all I can do is speak of it and spark some interest within out architecture program. But these people are people with masters, and bachelors degrees, but what's killing me is that they're sitting on them. I'm planning on getting an internship with the BR City-Parish Planning Commission to see exactly how things work, and hopefully I can use that experience to my advantage. . .dunno tho. .just a thought for now. lol thanks tho, cajun dude. . lol

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Money is not the problem. There's plenty of money in and around the Scotlandville community. SUSA, you are not old enough to remember this, but there was a time when Scottland Ave. was bustling with the very businesses you would like to see. Grocery stores, movie theatres, restaurants, auto repair, doctors, dentists, etc. Unfortunately, back in the late 60's/early 70's at the end of segregation, a lot of that went away. The residents of Scotlandville went down Airline, Plank Rd, Florida Blvd and other areas to do business. This killed the local business community.

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Money is not the problem. There's plenty of money in and around the Scotlandville community. SUSA, you are not old enough to remember this, but there was a time when Scottland Ave. was bustling with the very businesses you would like to see. Grocery stores, movie theatres, restaurants, auto repair, doctors, dentists, etc. Unfortunately, back in the late 60's/early 70's at the end of segregation, a lot of that went away. The residents of Scotlandville went down Airline, Plank Rd, Florida Blvd and other areas to do business. This killed the local business community.

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That is a problem....you have to support your neighborhood when possible. I tried to keep my beer dollars heading to Shroom or Bogie's because that was the neighborhood that I lived in when I was in BR.....and I was happy to drink there ;)

I am guilty because I did buy my groceries at Wal Mart to save money and I did hit the dollar store in old south more than once for the same reason even though I didn't live there....but the point is that I tried to stay in the neighborhood (gas money kind of kept me there during college anyways....more gas means less beer).

If these local retailers don't want to supply a decent product or a clean environment, then you should blame them for the neighborhood being the way that it is. Still, maybe one of yall will open the next big thing in town right there on Harding or in Howell Place.

Who knows?

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I just feel that Harding has alot to offer to the north Baton Rouge community. It can possible become the next College. We all know that some badly needed businesses here are: grocery stores, hotels (airport), modest shopping, a coffee house. . (im bein a little selfish, but us architecture students need Somethin to keep us awake.. .. starbucks wont hurt. .lol) small restaurants. I don't think that's a lot to ask. Maybe I can do something to convince people that just because north BR is "lacking" in development and overall income levels within households and what not doesnt mean ... ... that we can't support maybe a Wal Mart, Starbucks, and a few restaurants. . I mean, it's not like they're thriving off of Scotlandville alone up here . . . .there is Southern University. I'm sure businesses will be pretty damn successful on the main street leading to campus. lol You should see the cars coming across the hump during the middle of the day looking for sumthin to eat, and Im sorry, but McDonald's is NOT cutting it. lol

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I think it could support all you mentioned except for maybe a Wal Mart supercenter, being that Baker is only a mile or two away (the college drive wal mart is 2 miles away from LSU).

It will happen...but come on....if you think there is a market for a restaurant, then maybe you should open up a Raoul's style burget joint or some kind of seafood place.

Isn't Picadilly still on Plank? Even so, the one thing that I see Howell place having too much of in the future is restaurants.

There's already a handful of them there.

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I am encouraged to see developer Richard Preis take the risk and build Howell Place at a "gold-mine" location after many said he would fail. He realized the area's "untapped" potential next to the Airport, near Southern; between the major streets like Harding, Plank, Airline Hwy. and I-110.

Most cities tend to have hotels near the Airport. It finally happen for BR! The Hilton Garden Inn is a nice looking hotel.

There's an aerial in the new Business Report of the massive new Coca-Cola plant now being built; the shell of the structure is already up. That will add another boost for the area :thumbsup:

How has IHOP been doing over there??

Hey SUSA, got any designs to develop a nice high-rise tower for downtown BR?? Or a multi-story condo near Southern U.??

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I am encouraged to see developer Richard Preis take the risk and build Howell Place at a "gold-mine" location after many said he would fail. He realized the area's "untapped" potential next to the Airport, near Southern; between the major streets like Harding, Plank, Airline Hwy. and I-110.

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I am encouraged to see developer Richard Preis take the risk and build Howell Place at a "gold-mine" location after many said he would fail. He realized the area's "untapped" potential next to the Airport, near Southern; between the major streets like Harding, Plank, Airline Hwy. and I-110.

Most cities tend to have hotels near the Airport. It finally happen for BR! The Hilton Garden Inn is a nice looking hotel.

There's an aerial in the new Business Report of the massive new Coca-Cola plant now being built; the shell of the structure is already up. That will add another boost for the area :thumbsup:

How has IHOP been doing over there??

Hey SUSA, got any designs to develop a nice high-rise tower for downtown BR?? Or a multi-story condo near Southern U.??

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I am encouraged to see developer Richard Preis take the risk and build Howell Place at a "gold-mine" location after many said he would fail. He realized the area's "untapped" potential next to the Airport, near Southern; between the major streets like Harding, Plank, Airline Hwy. and I-110.

Most cities tend to have hotels near the Airport. It finally happen for BR! The Hilton Garden Inn is a nice looking hotel.

There's an aerial in the new Business Report of the massive new Coca-Cola plant now being built; the shell of the structure is already up. That will add another boost for the area :thumbsup:

How has IHOP been doing over there??

Hey SUSA, got any designs to develop a nice high-rise tower for downtown BR?? Or a multi-story condo near Southern U.??

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That area will become North Baton Rouges Power Center.....like richy said...it's close to the airport,I-10,Plank,Harding,Southern University....i mean all the way from Harding Blvd to Airline Hwy where all the interstate lanes change and cross over to different Lanes.....city place is about the same time they were just smart with the usage of the land...and im willing to bet atleast one Major Entertainment feature will be built there such as a Movie Theater,bowling,skating rink, lazer tag....something....i see it

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That area will become North Baton Rouges Power Center.....like richy said...it's close to the airport,I-10,Plank,Harding,Southern University....i mean all the way from Harding Blvd to Airline Hwy where all the interstate lanes change and cross over to different Lanes.....city place is about the same time they were just smart with the usage of the land...and im willing to bet atleast one Major Entertainment feature will be built there such as a Movie Theater,bowling,skating rink, lazer tag....something....i see it

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New Coca-Cola plant getting bigger

Baton Rouge Coca-Cola Bottling Co. is making changes to the $80 million bottling plant and distribution facility it is building near Metro Airport. The company is expected to go before the Planning Commission on Monday afternoon with a proposal to add 184,000 square feet to the facility, which is scheduled to open in the fall. The addition would boost the size of the plant to 459,000 square feet.

http://www.businessreport.com/archives/daily-report/latest/

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