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SouthEnd Midrise Projects

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2 hours ago, NCMike1990 said:

ClearSky has a new photo gallery showing the WellsFargo at Kingston/South Blvd.

http://photos.clearskyimages.com/2018-04-1625-south-charlotte-nc-aerials

Wonder if there are plans to redevelop this site?

assuming the CRA still exists this would also be an easy branch to close from a regulatory perspective.

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New hotel coming to site in Dilworth South End once slated for Kimpton.  A new  135 room Courtyard by Marriott 7 stories 135 room hotel.  New Hyatt Place coming to LH Rea Farm Village in south Charlotte.

Subscriber article 

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2018/04/20/hotel-with-rooftop-concept-coming-to-former.html?ana=TWT_staffAF

""OmShera Hotel Group acquired the roughly 1.2-acre site at East Worthington and Cleveland avenues in the fall and will develop a six-story, 135-room Courtyard by Marriott hotel there""

Edited by KJHburg
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46 minutes ago, Missmylab4 said:

Crappy flag for that location. 

Not to mention the building is hideous

  

image.png

46 minutes ago, Missmylab4 said:

  

Edited by Jayvee

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Kush Anandani, director at OmShera Group, said the Dilworth hotel will be a custom Courtyard as opposed to a more prototypical hotel. He said the hotel will be a very similar design as what was approved in Catellus' rezoning a few years ago, in which the hotel group worked closely with the Dilworth neighborhood.

So, then the Kimpton was going to be hideous as well??!? It's not a fancy flag, but I've been to plenty of Courtyards that are modern and have great amenities.

Quote

Anandani said the hotel will have an "urban, local community" feel. It will include a roughly 5,000-square-foot rooftop restaurant/bar concept that  Erin Zitelli-Davis at The Chambers Group is marketing on behalf of OmShera, Anandani said.

And this area needs hotel rooms!

Edited by Scribe
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4 hours ago, KJHburg said:

Interesting about Wells branch possibly maybe they want to consolidate into their office at South and New Bern.  They are closing some branches around town to pare their network.  

There were area plans a long time back that showed the New Bern WF location going away and that little plot turning into park space.

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On 4/11/2018 at 3:28 PM, AP3 said:

New Bern Station update
d9bac08b14bbd96981e4a560eecdf48f.jpg


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Jeep Cherokee?

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It's not that bad but it's much more suited for an exit off of 485 rather than here.

It’s symmetrical, mostly brick, sure it looks like one of Johnny Harris’ morning “deposits” but it’s a great use for a very strange spot, surprised Dilworth didn’t burn down city hall when a hotel was proposed here.


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51 minutes ago, NY+SC=NC said:

So, riding through Upper South End I came to the realization that old Charlotte has officially changed. Before now, to me, all the projects never truly changed how the street appeal felt. I'd say the only other things that made the "feel" change was the light rail project the then called Bobcats Arena build and Bearden park area. Maybe even the rejuvenation of Midtown, especially around CPCC. But, yesterday I felt like I was visiting somewhere else. I don't think I've ever witnessed so many people milling around, walking dogs, just living life on foot without some type of catalyst other than just because. Then top that off with all the construction and visualizing the fact that it just going to increase.... soon in fact. It was an amazing experience. 

Growing up, my friends and I used to talk about what Charlotte needed to be more city like. We'd say "If only there was a river going through Uptown." Or "if only there were more towers or store fronts facing the street." Then here we are today, we don't have a river, but we do have the greenway, we definitely have an increase of towers and from the look of it the sidewalk facing retail is just around the corner.

To be alive during this transformation is something to behold. I can't say I never imagined this becaused I definitely did. It's seeing my imagination happen that's blowing my mind. I can even say my expectations have been exceeded in some ways. I look forward to the future, my only worry is that this brand new Charlotte won't feel like home anymore. Or is that just me?

I completey agree. This year is the first year I’ve seen the amount of foot traffic in southend. One day last week every brewery seemed to be full, people were out on the street, the Rail Trail was full of people, and lots of people walking down south Blvd. I have never seen this much pedestrian activity in Southend. 

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44 minutes ago, NY+SC=NC said:

To be alive during this transformation is something to behold. I can't say I never imagined this becaused I definitely did. It's seeing my imagination happen that's blowing my mind. I can even say my expectations have been exceeded in some ways. I look forward to the future, my only worry is that this brand new Charlotte won't feel like home anymore. Or is that just me?

Without getting NIMBY or stick-in-the-mud about it, you're justified in feeling that way.


Just logistically: we are getting all of this built-environment growth because people from all over the country are moving here. That means tens of thousands of people with their own unique hometown experience, all being mushed up together in a new place. 


In a way, that is its own kind of unifying force, but if you've spent more than [x] years here, that can seem a bit alienating, even if you (or your parents)  moved from somewhere else.

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On 4/21/2018 at 3:45 PM, atlrvr said:

All brick and no EIFS would have been the winner here.

Here's the Courtyard in downtown Savannah.

 

savdt_main01_r.jpg?interpolation=progres

That's very nice.  I just stayed at this HGI in Brentwood (suburb of Nashville) and it looked like this:

image.jpeg.0a21a5ebbb1d32d9ec89873b96e003d0.jpeg

Picture doesn't do it justice.  Would look awesome in Dilworth (as would your example).  

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Jeep Cherokee?

Yep lol just traded it in though.


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3 hours ago, NY+SC=NC said:

I look forward to the future, my only worry is that this brand new Charlotte won't feel like home anymore. Or is that just me?

I feel like nativity/transplanting is cyclical. Theoretically, as the transplants come, stabilize, and have children, wouldn't that make a new generation of natives to sort of even the odds? Sure, it might feel foreign to someone else, but as cycles go, "home" will be a unique perception to the new generation of natives. You're just caught in the middle of the watershed.

I might get criticized for this comment, but I don't feel like Charlotte had much of an identity before. At least not compared to comparably sized places like Denver, Seattle, etc. So, I'm viewing today's growth as an attempt at gaining some degree of an identity. I'm enjoying it rather than feeling like something is being lost in the process. Because I don't think there was really much there to lose. Or if there is something being lost, it's worth the trade-off.

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50 minutes ago, Hunted said:

I feel like nativity/transplanting is cyclical. Theoretically, as the transplants come, stabilize, and have children, wouldn't that make a new generation of natives to sort of even the odds? Sure, it might feel foreign to someone else, but as cycles go, "home" will be a unique perception to the new generation of natives. You're just caught in the middle of the watershed.

I might get criticized for this comment, but I don't feel like Charlotte had much of an identity before. At least not compared to comparably sized places like Denver, Seattle, etc. So, I'm viewing today's growth as an attempt at gaining some degree of an identity. I'm enjoying it rather than feeling like something is being lost in the process. Because I don't think there was really much there to lose. Or if there is something being lost, it's worth the trade-off.

Fair points.  My parents moved here during the first Charlotte boom, and my siblings and I grew up here. We had a very confusing identity of "southern but not really, northern but not really." And we viewed Charlotte as identity-ambiguous.

 I believe the true "identity" of Charlotte, at least in decades past, was made up of the following:

-Inner city, and older rural areas (that subsequently had the suburbs grow around them... think Hickory Grove, or Derita): These people, white and black, knew their identity, and knew what Charlotte was (albeit from their own perspective), and they didn't feel the need for Charlotte to "find itself." The influx of people changing things made them feel as though Charlotte was losing its soul (still do, when you find them). Same thing happens with the small towns in the metro.


-Suburbs: consisting mostly of transplants, did NOT have a Charlotte identity. They made up larger numbers, and held most of the wealth, so their voices were loudest in proclaiming what Charlotte "is/was," and they are the ones who presented the narrative (which was true to them) that Charlotte had no culture, had no identity. When, in reality, Charlotte did have culture, it just wasn't the affluent kind, or the easily-recognizable kind.

Edited by SgtCampsalot
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I am not a native but have been here since the 1970's. People I know who are not natives, who are many, must have Coulwood, Derita, Thomasboro and other longtime neighborhoods from old Charlotte explained to them. Telling them where these areas are is difficult since they know of no landmarks even near these areas. Thrift, Rama, Berryhill, Oakdale, Pawtucket, Long Creek. Amay James, Sterling, Gunn and many more. How many can you locate?  People who lived in those neighborhoods then and many who live there now know what Charlotte is though it may not match what the Chamber of Commerce prefers.

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4 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

I am not a native but have been here since the 1970's. People I know who are not natives, who are many, must have Coulwood, Derita, Thomasboro and other longtime neighborhoods from old Charlotte explained to them. Telling them where these areas are is difficult since they know of no landmarks even near these areas. Thrift, Rama, Berryhill, Oakdale, Pawtucket, Long Creek. Amay James, Sterling, Gunn and many more. How many can you locate?  People who lived in those neighborhoods then and many who live there now know what Charlotte is though it may not match what the Chamber of Commerce prefers.

I can locate all but 3.

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