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Former ATLien here. (Also, this is my first post on UP after lurking for more than a year).  I lived in Atlanta my entire life. I spent the past 3 years living in both Midtown and along the Beltl

ClearSky has new pics of SouthEnd. https://photos.clearskyimages.com/2019-05-1812-s-blvd-charlotte-nc-hli    

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9 minutes ago, j-man said:

I get that but gentrification nowadays is literally driven by money hungry and greedy developers and realtors who don’t care about architecture as you can see. I’m sure 100 years ago houses were built with more thought put  into it. Specifically how homes in certain cities have their own identity separate from others. A house in Manhattan looked different from a house in Miami, or different in a San Francisco vs a Charleston, or a home in D.C. looked different from a Savannah. That’s my point. And now every singe city is building the same exact homes. I’ve seen this exact design in New Orleans, to Orlando, to Houston, and I’m like....wow every city is losing a big part of what separates them from the each other. And that’s their architecture. 

It the sameness doesn't stop at Houston.  Sometimes I do a double take looking at pictures posted in this forum because I see new buildings going up in Charlotte that look nearly identical to buildings going up here in San Diego, or new buildings I see when I'm in the D.C. area.  It used to be more interesting traveling this country because each city and region had its own architectural character.  But now we're losing that.  The whole country is starting to look the same, which is all the more reason Charlotte needs to preserve those old brick mills and warehouses and homes, and have new construction designed along the lines of the Rail Yard and Lowes, which convey that same feeling and aesthetics.  Those buildings look like Charlotte.  All those five-story apartment buildings look like Anywhere U.S.A.

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1 hour ago, atlrvr said:

I blame Pinterest.   Greedy Developers will build whatever Instagram Posting Millennials want.

Edit for slight elaboration: We live in a far more "global" society than 100 years ago, where we are now curated styles we are expected to appreciate by algorithms examining our social network and viewing history (as opposed to walking around town and seeing what the neighbors did)   We've been accelerating towards this for 20 years and the era individualized homogeneity is here in housing and every other aspect of life.

I definitely agree with this! Globalization is seen now more than ever. It has some positives to it but many negatives. I say bring back the individualness of things. And chain restaurants are honestly out of control. I saw a list of fast food restaurants and how many locations they have nationwide and so many of them had between 1000 to 10,000 locations....literally there are over 8,000 Starbucks and 14,000 McDonald’s in the U.S. That’s insane! Ugh :o

Edited by j-man
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4 hours ago, j-man said:

I get that but gentrification nowadays is literally driven by money hungry and greedy developers and realtors who don’t care about architecture as you can see. I’m sure 100 years ago houses were built with more thought put  into it. Specifically how homes in certain cities have their own identity separate from others. A house in Manhattan looked different from a house in Miami, or different in a San Francisco vs a Charleston, or a home in D.C. looked different from a Savannah. That’s my point. And now every singe city is building the same exact homes. I’ve seen this exact design in New Orleans, to Orlando, to Houston, and I’m like....wow every city is losing a big part of what separates them from the each other. And that’s their architecture. Tbh this picture at fist glance looks like the photo from an article I read about gentrification in Austin. And don’t even get me started on these apartments. 

Have you ever thought that the only reason houses were built with "so much thought" is because every single piece was milled, poured, baked, smelt, chopped, soldered with 10 fingers, two hands, and one brain? Now its done on an assembly line, by massive teams that figure out the "cheapest" and "most efficient" ways to do things? To recreate a brownstone or an east village row house from NYC in Charlotte would cost millions. Regionalism in architecture existed because we were a regionalistic society. Now we are worldly.

Edited by The Real Clayton
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8 hours ago, The Real Clayton said:

Have you ever thought that the only reason houses were built with "so much thought" is because every single piece was milled, poured, baked, smelt, chopped, soldered with 10 fingers, two hands, and one brain? Now its done on an assembly line, by massive teams that figure out the "cheapest" and "most efficient" ways to do things? To recreate a brownstone or an east village row house from NYC in Charlotte would cost millions. Regionalism in architecture existed because we were a regionalistic society. Now we are worldly.

Yes I have. That’s my entire point. 

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MarcoPolo, I pretty much agree with everything you're saying, but I want to point out that La Défense in Paris is outside the historic core of the city.  Paris is extremely careful about maintaining its historic architectural identity and sets aside those modern buildings and skyscrapers in a completely separate area.  Charlotte takes very little care to maintain any of the small amount if historic value it holds.  While I am as excited as anybody to see the explosive development in South End, I worry that the city is not taking steps to protect those historic assets that made the area cool in the first place.  And perhaps they're also willing to allow structures that might not fit the neighborhood aesthetic.  I do like the look of the Lowes building but feel that its height overwhelms nearby structures.  And worry the same about the building coming to East/West.

A couple months ago I posted this video in another thread.  It explains this much better than I can.

 

 

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50 minutes ago, ertley said:

But excepting Charleston, look at the downtown areas of any small or medium sized town in the Metrolina area: Are any of them exceptionally unique, in terms of architecture? Each town might have one or two, at most, standout buildings, but generally they're pretty generic.

I agree with your larger point, but I did feel the need to quibble with this. Both Winston and Durham have very unusual industrial districts (now residential or office/research) adjacent to their downtowns which were a product of cigarette manufacturing -- granted the downtowns themselves (with the exception of the Reynolds Building) are kinda blah. I would also hold up downtown Asheville as architecturally unique (for the South) thanks to all the money that was sloshing around the city in the 1920s. Granted, this is little more than a semantic issue.

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59 minutes ago, ertley said:

BUT, what we're dealing with is the story of every leading city that we know and appreciate. If any of them had refused allowed new, and even less than stellar, buildings to be erected by developers who were less concerned with creating community than eking profit for themselves, sometimes cheek by jowl with older buildings, you wouldn't have the iconic cities you see today. London and Paris would look like the other old cities in their respective countries, lovely but not easily distinguishable, and New York would look a lot like old town Philadelphia, I suspect. DC, well, there was nothing there...but...Much of what we like about these cities is the result of what was, in the past, very much modern architecture and sometimes brutal urban planning and renewal . It's simply a constant battle of vigilance to preserve as much as possible, to allow a unique CITY to develop, and it ain't nothin' new. We just need to learn the right lessons.    

Fantastic comment, and a good perspective to remember. I do think there is one key difference between the developments of today and those of yesteryear - the scale of buildings. Older city blocks, even when developed rapidly, consisted of many smaller buildings, which produces a more human-scaled texture to the urban fabric. Today's developments often consist of one building occupying an entire block. There are a lot of reasons why this is less desirable - see this article for a detailed explanation.

https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2019/6/11/a-city-shaped-by-many-hands

Edited by jthomas
grammar nazi
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1 hour ago, KJHburg said:

Southend is truly one of  the best urban neighborhoods in the southeast. 

It has completely transformed since 2009 when I was working in Charlotte. SouthEnd was much quieter back then it seemed but now has so much life.

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5 hours ago, kermit said:

I like Pollo Campero, but this little real estate exaggeration in a CBJ article on their expansion was too much for me:

(their store is on South blvd at ARCHDALE! Before much longer Southend will reach all the way to Rock Hill)

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2021/03/30/pollo-campero-is-targeting-expansion-in-charlotte.html

I feel like Charlotte’s not-so-popular neighborhoods need to brand themselves better.  Most people have no clue about Montclaire, Ashley Park, Ashbrook, Starmount, Biddleville, etc etc so they are always clumped with what is closest to them that people know.  

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I wonder if Falfurius' investment into Carolina Foods accelerates them leaving South End to move to a new modern manufacturing plant?

This is the Honey Bun plant on the full block at West/Tryon/Hawkins/Worthington.

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2021/04/02/falfurrias-capital-investment-in-carolina-foods.html?cx_testId=40&cx_testVariant=cx_23&cx_artPos=1#cxrecs_s

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