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SouthEnd Midrise Projects


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What is this huge stretch of low-rise, spread-out buildings between Tryon and 77 in South End? Roughly bordered on the other sides by Tremont and Clanton. These buildings seem residential but they are incredibly low-density with vast amounts of green lawn space. Does anyone know if this area is being looked at for redevelopment? Seems like prime land in a great location.

 

Screenshot 2022-08-01 110943.jpg

Screenshot 2022-08-01 111308.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Reverie39 said:

What is this huge stretch of low-rise, spread-out buildings between Tryon and 77 in South End? Roughly bordered on the other sides by Tremont and Clanton. These buildings seem residential but they are incredibly low-density with vast amounts of green lawn space. Does anyone know if this area is being looked at for redevelopment? Seems like prime land in a great location.

 

Screenshot 2022-08-01 110943.jpg

Screenshot 2022-08-01 111308.jpg

That's condemned, privately owned low income housing that's few people still live in. It's been in redevelopment hell for a while now because of funding/approval issues if I remember correctly. This neighborhood has been discussed before. The name of the area is escaping me at the moment..... I'm getting old.

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5 hours ago, norm21499 said:

That's condemned, privately owned low income housing that's few people still live in. It's been in redevelopment hell for a while now because of funding/approval issues if I remember correctly. This neighborhood has been discussed before. The name of the area is escaping me at the moment..... I'm getting old.

Brookhill.

Current owners have 27 years remaining on their ground lease so ownership issues are the thing complicating redevelopment.

Edited by kermit
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I'm... fascinated by the decision to build this low-income housing with so much... emptiness. It's like they intentionally bought way too much land for the limited number of units they wanted to develop.

Surely we can find a solution for re-developing this area that still provides plenty of low-income housing, only this time with more density and walkability to South End's amenities. And in doing so probably open up half that area for other developments too now that not all the land is being used. I'm sad that it's stuck in contract hell... hopefully it gets resolved at some point. This is the type of thing Charlotte needs to get on top of to cement its status as a major city - other bustling cities don't have these types of half-empty neighborhoods right next to their urban cores!

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8 minutes ago, Reverie39 said:

I'm... fascinated by the decision to build this low-income housing with so much... emptiness. It's like they intentionally bought way too much land for the limited number of units they wanted to develop.

Surely we can find a solution for re-developing this area that still provides plenty of low-income housing, only this time with more density and walkability to South End's amenities. And in doing so probably open up half that area for other developments too now that not all the land is being used. I'm sad that it's stuck in contract hell... hopefully it gets resolved at some point. This is the type of thing Charlotte needs to get on top of to cement its status as a major city - other bustling cities don't have these types of half-empty neighborhoods right next to their urban cores!

I know Norfolk, VA doesn't compare to Charlotte, but it has similar situations in its downtown core. There is a plan in place to slowly redevelop the area there in  a more dense fashion while keeping some affordable housing.

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2 hours ago, Reverie39 said:

I'm... fascinated by the decision to build this low-income housing with so much... emptiness. It's like they intentionally bought way too much land for the limited number of units they wanted to develop.

IIRC it was originally army barracks before the Spangler’s  purchased the property and began leasing it as is (was).

EDIT: I was wrong about military. The buildings were constructed on the leased land in 1951. The ground lease ends in 2049.

https://charlotte.axios.com/193571/brookhill-how-one-of-charlottes-most-complicated-and-misunderstood-developments-could-end-up-a-success-story/

Edited by kermit
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Many of the residents of Brooklyn were relocated to newly built housing elsewhere, especially the original Dalton Village on West Boulevard. This project of the Housing Authority then descended into the common result of crowding every low income family into one location and expecting the buildings to enrich their life. After decades of misuse, desuetude and neglect the original buildings were demolished and a new version stands today.  Better planning, better selection, better maintenance and better results. Of the many examples of public housing from the late 1940's to the 1970's, some designed for white families during segregation, SouthSide homes, a block from Brookhill, remains as the sole survivor, as far as I know. Others, such as Dalton Village and Boulevard Homes were considered unsalvageable and rebuilt with new arrangements and newly selected tenants and on the original grounds. 

Piedmont Courts, Earle Village, Keyway Homes, Double Oaks, Belvedere Homes, along with the two above are from my memory. Only Southside remains as and where it was.

I can say that some of these locations in the 1970's and 1980's I would never go, no matter the time of day or reason. Is there a place in Charlotte that today you would never go due to fear for your safety? There were several during that time. 

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On 8/1/2022 at 11:45 AM, carolinaboy said:

I know Norfolk, VA doesn't compare to Charlotte, but it has similar situations in its downtown core. There is a plan in place to slowly redevelop the area there in  a more dense fashion while keeping some affordable housing.

Your right. In Norfolk we have a whole area called tidewater gardens just like that. Its filled with what is now crime ridden low income housing that was not only bad looks for the city but it was not a good place for its residents too. Hopefully since our redevelopment of that area has started we will end up among  the major East Coast cities just like we used to back in the 40s and 50s.

Edited by mintscraft56
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Byron's is pretty much "THE" wedding spot in Charlotte if you are having an indoor reception or getting married in a season like winter. This will benefit The Collector's Room on Tryon, Big Chill in Dilworth, and Foundation for the Carolinas that are the closest comparable non-hotel competitors that will strike a big competitor. 

Replacing Bryon's though opens up a lot of space at the Design Center for uses that don't require an invitation / special events only like more shops and restaurants. 

Edited by CLT2014
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1 hour ago, CLTProductions said:

Timeline for Norfolk isnt entire accurate, itll more likely be 2023...as for Byrons, *big things have small beginnings* stayyyyy tuned

Given they are putting a tower on one piece of this, I have to wonder if there is going to be a tower, maybe residential, where Byron’s is

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1 minute ago, Blue_Devil said:

I used to have a plan, are you facing east or west there? If you are facing West toward the Harris Teeter, that would be townhomes

I was facing East away from Harris Teeter.  The entire block is fenced  all the way to the retention pond. Townhomes would make sense.  Thanks

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3 hours ago, CLT2014 said:

Byron's is pretty much "THE" wedding spot in Charlotte if you are having an indoor reception or getting married in a season like winter. This will benefit The Collector's Room on Tryon, Big Chill in Dilworth, and Foundation for the Carolinas that are the closest comparable non-hotel competitors that will strike a big competitor. 

Replacing Bryon's though opens up a lot of space at the Design Center for uses that don't require an invitation / special events only like more shops and restaurants. 

the same operators of Bryons are opening up a big space up in Camp Northend which we saw the interior of on our UP walking tour.    and yes I heard a restaurant for this space I think. 

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