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titanhog

Edgehill Neighborhood

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I just purchased a small home that I will use as a home/office about a half-block off of Music Row. There are some incredible homes in this area, but it is so blighted by crack houses and run down homes that is saddens me that it's not improved at a quicker pace.

The area I'm talking about is the neighborhood between Division on the north, Wedgewood on the South, 16th on the West and 12th on the East. I realize a portion of this area is public housing, but a great deal of it is run down private property.

Vandy keeps pushing eastward into Music Row...so I imagine the music industry would be the most likely to move east into this area as soon as they can get the city to zone it for commercial / office / retail. I can't believe a developer hasn't gone in there and offered some good money for these homes and upgraded this area. Personally, I'm gonna fix up my little house and add some killer landscaping...and I hope it encourages some of my neighbors to do the same.

I truly believe this is an untapped area that will boom big in the near future...especially with its proximity to Vandy, Belmont, Music Row and the Gulch. If I had the money, I'd buy up every little house that went for sale and fix it up.

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Hi Titon,

Did you buy the house on Tremont between Villa and 16th? I live down the street at Villa and Grand. (My house is the one with boarded up doors. We are refinishing them and should, hopefully, have them back on shortly.)

My wife and I bought in this neighborhood three years ago and have been renovating since then. Hopefully the neighborhood will keep getting better. It is the last neighborhood walking distance to Vanderbilt that is affordable.

Unfortunately, there are three forces that work against improving the neighborhood. First, there are some absent homeowners who will not fix/maintain or sell their property. For example, the green house at the corner of Villa and Tremont could be wonderful, but instead is falling apart and will eventually not be worth saving. My own next door neighbor is another. Basically, some people are so overwhelmed that they can

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Hi Titon,

Did you buy the house on Tremont between Villa and 16th? I live down the street at Villa and Grand. (My house is the one with boarded up doors. We are refinishing them and should, hopefully, have them back on shortly.)

My wife and I bought in this neighborhood three years ago and have been renovating since then. Hopefully the neighborhood will keep getting better. It is the last neighborhood walking distance to Vanderbilt that is affordable.

Unfortunately, there are three forces that work against improving the neighborhood. First, there are some absent homeowners who will not fix/maintain or sell their property. For example, the green house at the corner of Villa and Tremont could be wonderful, but instead is falling apart and will eventually not be worth saving. My own next door neighbor is another. Basically, some people are so overwhelmed that they can

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A couple factors at work. Not many people want to live a block from the projects. They need to tear down those projects and sell the land on the open market. Residents in that area need to start taking pride in their property. I think people like you titanhog could accelerate the change in the area, but it will still take time. Eventually you could have a great urban neighborhood from Edgehill to 21st all the way to Demonbreun.

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A couple factors at work. Not many people want to live a block from the projects. They need to tear down those projects and sell the land on the open market. Residents in that area need to start taking pride in their property. I think people like you titanhog could accelerate the change in the area, but it will still take time. Eventually you could have a great urban neighborhood from Edgehill to 21st all the way to Demonbreun.

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You need to hope that the HOPE Grants are renewed. I can think of at least three housing projects that can be included. One is here in Edge Hill, the next in East Nashville on Shelby and the third on Lafayette. I never can remember the names, but that would go a long way to help jump start all of those neighborhoods.

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One thing that can be done is to have total community involvement by all the neighbors, black, hispanic, and white; young and old ; rich and poor. This area has all of the above and everyone has the same goals even if they do not realize it. They do not want crime, they want a safe place to raise their kids, local stores, clean streets and I could go on.

Open dialog and as many of the people in the area pulling together for one common goal. A neighborhood association in you will. You have to build on the things you have in common. You would not have a problem with the housing project if the citizens there thought someone really cared and you knew they care too. I know this is a Utopian idea of sorts, but you have to start somewhere. I go to church in this area and we just did a community outreach there. There are loads of great people in this area and just a few bad apples. If everyone worked together the bad apples would go somewhere else.

It takes the local alderman, the police, the mayors office, concerned citizens, religious leaders, and business owners and you could have a heck of a great neighborhood. Then you would see redevelopment come from the effort you start.

I will gladly get off my soapbox as I have probably said enough to hang myself. :unsure::)

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I think that your comment about the diverse neighbors having the same goals even if they do not realize it is important. It seems to me that this neighborhood is tremendously polarized. The amount of argument over Belmont's offer to upgrade tha park in exchange for a certain amount of use of the park was extreme to say the least. I understand that neighbors want to be able to use their park. I also understand how neighbors feel about university expansion when the university is in an urban fabric (this was a huge issue at my school, DePaul, in Chicago). I also understand fears about gentrification. But public housing is not going anywhere anytime soon, and so those people in that housing do not have to fear losing it because of neighborhood improvement. I could not understand why there would be so much opposition to private investment in public spaces that everyone in the neighborhood can enjoy.

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I think that your comment about the diverse neighbors having the same goals even if they do not realize it is important. It seems to me that this neighborhood is tremendously polarized. The amount of argument over Belmont's offer to upgrade tha park in exchange for a certain amount of use of the park was extreme to say the least. I understand that neighbors want to be able to use their park. I also understand how neighbors feel about university expansion when the university is in an urban fabric (this was a huge issue at my school, DePaul, in Chicago). I also understand fears about gentrification. But public housing is not going anywhere anytime soon, and so those people in that housing do not have to fear losing it because of neighborhood improvement. I could not understand why there would be so much opposition to private investment in public spaces that everyone in the neighborhood can enjoy.

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One thing that can be done is to have total community involvement by all the neighbors, black, hispanic, and white; young and old ; rich and poor. This area has all of the above and everyone has the same goals even if they do not realize it. They do not want crime, they want a safe place to raise their kids, local stores, clean streets and I could go on.

Open dialog and as many of the people in the area pulling together for one common goal. A neighborhood association in you will. You have to build on the things you have in common. You would not have a problem with the housing project if the citizens there thought someone really cared and you knew they care too. I know this is a Utopian idea of sorts, but you have to start somewhere. I go to church in this area and we just did a community outreach there. There are loads of great people in this area and just a few bad apples. If everyone worked together the bad apples would go somewhere else.

It takes the local alderman, the police, the mayors office, concerned citizens, religious leaders, and business owners and you could have a heck of a great neighborhood. Then you would see redevelopment come from the effort you start.

I will gladly get off my soapbox as I have probably said enough to hang myself. :unsure::)

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Smeagolsfree,

There is a neighborhood organization, ONE, that I mentioned above. It holds meetings on multiple topics. In the crime meeting, the neighbors meet each other (including the public housing residents) and we also meet with the police. Unfortunately, it

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Where and when do you hold these meetings? Since the home I bought is considered in "Edgehill Estates", am I welcome to come to the meetings?

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I don't know where Edgehill Estates is. Edgehill is usually defined as between 8th and Villa Pl and Wedgewood and Division. Hope this helps. The next ONE meeting is Saturday 10am at the Easley Center on Edgehill.

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Hey guys, I lived for years near 16th and Grand; villa was my the street behind us. I know a few residents right there that might be interested in this. Is it open to the public? I would like to get the word out. It is late in the day, if not this one, maybe the next one. I am terrible easy to track down :D

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Smeagolsfree,

There is a neighborhood organization, ONE, that I mentioned above. It holds meetings on multiple topics. In the crime meeting, the neighbors meet each other (including the public housing residents) and we also meet with the police. Unfortunately, it

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This is somewhat related to this thread. There is an article int he Tennessean today about the need for a grocery store in this area. I will have to say if they had a Kroger, it will do a lot better than the Save A Lot that was there in the past. Not a lot of room at that location but maybe there is another alternative in the area for a grocery store. Ideas? Suggestions?

Remember this is only a few blocks from the Gulch.

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar.../804020364/1475

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Well having been a long time resident of that neck of the woods. There was a Winn Dixie there YEARS ago. I walked to work near 12th and Demonbruen home to the Belmont area... egads ... in 81 - 83 ish... It was a nice store. Then it became the Save A Lot. It should work like gang busters, there isnt a Grocery.... lets see.... Osbornes Bi Rite on Belmont, the Kroger in Melrose, Farmers Market, the Hills Store on Church Street... I think those are all of the close options. I would love to see a local produce, locally owned butcher in that area. I loathe Walmart and other big box stores... however a Walmart neighborhood Grocery like in Nippers Corner, or a Dollar General Grocery like out off Nolensville Road.. should both work. The ticket is to get the community that is close to want to shop there and not to insist on driving into Green d'la Hills! (And to make sure the customer service is extremely professional - even Krogers in Green Hills doesn't have the same insistence on CS that HG HILLS did.) What a bout a CSA/Farmers Market to general interest in the area!

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The one thing the article did mention was the fact there were a number of low income folks in the area that had to take a cab to get thier groceries. I do understand that plight as well. I had a friend that I went to church with a couple of years ago that did not drive and was somewhat disabled. He lived in some of the section 8 housing off of 12th and I took him the Kroger's on 8th a lot. I know there are a lot of people in that situation. I think that may be the biggest concern for many here.

With the Gulch only a few blocks away, someone could have a great opportunity now.

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This wasteland parking lot/former Save-A-Lot sure would make a great spot for a "neighborhood center," with a good grocery store, retail and mixed housing. I know, "the projects" are all around, but this is a large under[un]used site in a high-traffic area. And it's close to the Gluch, Vandy, Belmont, 12South, etc.

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One interesting quote from the article:

"Before the 1960s, the Edgehill area was culturally and economically vibrant, home to many of the city's black professionals and a flourishing commercial district.

As federal urban renewal programs set in, hundreds of families were displaced and the district's businesses suffered as a result. The once heavily trafficked business district became a row of boarded storefronts and empty lots."

I know I may sound like a broken record, but the purpose of public aid is to help people. If public housing isn't helping, then it needs to go, especially given the costs in holding back city development. In 1996 Bill Clinton put time limits on welfare, which ended up decreasing the rolls by 60%, all while lowering the child poverty rate. That is, limiting public aid actually ended up dramatically helping the lowest income people. When will public housing be decreased by 60%? Time limits? If the federal politicians won't do it, Nashville should. Places like Charlotte, N.C. and even Washington D.C. are already heading in this direction. (Remember that welfare reform started to appear in cities, like New York, before the feds followed.)

Good intentions are not enough. The people who supported urban renewal programs had good intentions. They were the affordable housing advocates of their day.

Phil Ryan, are you out there? Any thoughts?

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One interesting quote from the article:

"Before the 1960s, the Edgehill area was culturally and economically vibrant, home to many of the city's black professionals and a flourishing commercial district.

As federal urban renewal programs set in, hundreds of families were displaced and the district's businesses suffered as a result. The once heavily trafficked business district became a row of boarded storefronts and empty lots."

I know I may sound like a broken record, but the purpose of public aid is to help people. If public housing isn't helping, then it needs to go, especially given the costs in holding back city development. In 1996 Bill Clinton put time limits on welfare, which ended up decreasing the rolls by 60%, all while lowering the child poverty rate. That is, limiting public aid actually ended up dramatically helping the lowest income people. When will public housing be decreased by 60%? Time limits? If the federal politicians won't do it, Nashville should. Places like Charlotte, N.C. and even Washington D.C. are already heading in this direction. (Remember that welfare reform started to appear in cities, like New York, before the feds followed.)

Good intentions are not enough. The people who supported urban renewal programs had good intentions. They were the affordable housing advocates of their day.

Phil Ryan, are you out there? Any thoughts?

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