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Charetts used in planning

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http://www.courant.com/community/news/fv/h...0,4918911.story

Towns Turn To 19th-Century Tradition Of Charrettes

Mansfield is in the midst of developing a new downtown near the UConn campus. The town had a charrette and lots of public workshops in the past eight years that led to changes in its zoning regulations to allow for mixed-use development for the downtown project, which should break ground next year.

In Connecticut, Farmington Valley residents interested in having a charrette in their towns aren't looking for that extreme of a process, but they want the chance to help shape their town. "In Canton, we really have no vision for what we want the town to look like 20, 25 years from now, and I think the best way to see that vision is to have a charrette," said Tom Sevigny, president of the resident group Canton Advocates for Responsible Expansion. "It's a direct democracy, people getting together and saying what they want the town to look like."

I really like this direct involvement in the process. I am not sure that everyone is as enlightened as members here, but if this kind of planning slows the big box and saves and strengthens the old downtowns I would be very happy. It seems it might be a little late for Canton, but at the same time they need a plan to deal with the booming growth. It have one of the nicest villages but some nasty big box sprawl as well.

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http://www.courant.com/community/news/fv/h...0,4918911.story

Towns Turn To 19th-Century Tradition Of Charrettes

Mansfield is in the midst of developing a new downtown near the UConn campus. The town had a charrette and lots of public workshops in the past eight years that led to changes in its zoning regulations to allow for mixed-use development for the downtown project, which should break ground next year.

In Connecticut, Farmington Valley residents interested in having a charrette in their towns aren't looking for that extreme of a process, but they want the chance to help shape their town. "In Canton, we really have no vision for what we want the town to look like 20, 25 years from now, and I think the best way to see that vision is to have a charrette," said Tom Sevigny, president of the resident group Canton Advocates for Responsible Expansion. "It's a direct democracy, people getting together and saying what they want the town to look like."

I really like this direct involvement in the process. I am not sure that everyone is as enlightened as members here, but if this kind of planning slows the big box and saves and strengthens the old downtowns I would be very happy. It seems it might be a little late for Canton, but at the same time they need a plan to deal with the booming growth. It have one of the nicest villages but some nasty big box sprawl as well.

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The development proposed on Hopmeadow in Simsbury that was shot down is next door to my job. It's within walking distance to approx. 1,000 employees and would have improved the quality of work life tremendously as I pretty much hate working here. The project had merit in my opinion, but of course represented a change for Simsbury. This was mixed use though, which put it miles ahead of The Shoppes in Canton. It could have been a nice place for CTTransit busses to stop as well. But, oh well. The nimbys have spoken. I guess they don't want anyone to live, walk, work, and shop in the same place here in Simsbury.

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