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AcklenLove

Where to buy a moped?

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Hey guys, I sold my car since I never have to drive, and now I'm looking for a moped for that rare trip I can't make by bike. Does anyone have any recommendations for a good place to buy one? Thanks! :)

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Yeeeeees! East Side Scooters! I had heard about them, but forgotten the name. Thanks a bunch, that's excatly what I needed to know!

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i really wish i hadn't have opened this thread. now i'm wanting a genuine blur 150! 89mpg is such a sexy number right now. that's $7.64 a week on gas for driving to work with gas at $4 a gal(i know that's what premium is, but by the time i might get the scooter.....). right now i'm paying around $30-40 a week going back and forth to work. $30.56/month < $140/ month. i could pay off the scooter with the money i'd save in gas! hmmmmm.....

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These scooters are becoming hella popular. When I look out my window, which faces Long, I see a moped about every five minutes during a weekend day. Join the bandwagon Buddy! (I see a lot of Buddys) :P

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yeah, there are a few people that come up and down e trinity ln in front of where i work on scooters. some are on some vespas. overpriced if you ask me.

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It's great that there's all this new interest in two-wheeled transport these days. As one who just took the plunge myself, let me offer some words of caution (This mostly applies to people considering a scooter or motorcycle as an everyday driver/commuter and not really for people riding as a hobby/for fun).

Make sure you consider all the costs beyond gas that go into bike operation.

These may include: a. cost of obtaining a license if you don't already have one ($200 for MSF rider class, highly recommended if you're not an experienced rider). b. Gear: DOT approved helmet ($80 and up to $1000!), gloves $30+, jacket $30+. c. more frequent maintenance requirements than cars: engine break-in period requires oil change, valve inspection/adjustment around first 500 miles, regular oil change every 2000 miles, tire replacement 5000-8000 miles depending on bike d. supplies to keep on hand: motor oil, lubricants, tools, etc. e. insurance, can be really cheap if you have good driving record, are over 25 and don't ride a sport bike.

Also, it's a good idea to check over the bike frequently (like before every ride) and make any required adjustments (adding oil, adjusting tire pressure, etc.), some of which may require additional expense.

Obviously, the lower purchase price is going to go a long way offsetting these costs versus a car, but keep in mind the limited practicality of a bike (and the danger) and some of the hidden costs.

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It's great that there's all this new interest in two-wheeled transport these days. As one who just took the plunge myself, let me offer some words of caution (This mostly applies to people considering a scooter or motorcycle as an everyday driver/commuter and not really for people riding as a hobby/for fun).

Make sure you consider all the costs beyond gas that go into bike operation.

These may include: a. cost of obtaining a license if you don't already have one ($200 for MSF rider class, highly recommended if you're not an experienced rider). b. Gear: DOT approved helmet ($80 and up to $1000!), gloves $30+, jacket $30+. c. more frequent maintenance requirements than cars: engine break-in period requires oil change, valve inspection/adjustment around first 500 miles, regular oil change every 2000 miles, tire replacement 5000-8000 miles depending on bike d. supplies to keep on hand: motor oil, lubricants, tools, etc. e. insurance, can be really cheap if you have good driving record, are over 25 and don't ride a sport bike.

Also, it's a good idea to check over the bike frequently (like before every ride) and make any required adjustments (adding oil, adjusting tire pressure, etc.), some of which may require additional expense.

Obviously, the lower purchase price is going to go a long way offsetting these costs versus a car, but keep in mind the limited practicality of a bike (and the danger) and some of the hidden costs.

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Very true about cost vs savings. If you are considering a hybrid, I would suggest waiting a year or so until "series hybrids" hit the market. The current generation of "parallel hybrids" don't offer huge gas savings given their costs and some are even designed for more performance rather than economy. The best one out there is the Toyota Prius because it can operate like a series hybrid due to the relatively complex transmission in the vehicle.

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Very true about cost vs savings. If you are considering a hybrid, I would suggest waiting a year or so until "series hybrids" hit the market. The current generation of "parallel hybrids" don't offer huge gas savings given their costs and some are even designed for more performance rather than economy. The best one out there is the Toyota Prius because it can operate like a series hybrid due to the relatively complex transmission in the vehicle.

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Are you looking for a moped? Or a scooter? Mopeds have pedals and are scarcely manufactured anymore. Tomos is one of the last makers of pedal mopeds and can be purchase for $1000 and up, depending on the model.

Try this site for used mopeds: http://www.mopedstore.org.

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+on a side note, i find it silly how some people are selling their cars (that are already paid off) to by a brand new hybrid in order to save on gas. of course they will save on gas, but the cost of the new car has canceled out any savings that they make for the next 5-7 years.

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As far as some Hybrids go, Dealers are getting whatever they ask for them. I saw one news article that showed one dealer selling a hybrid, $3000 over sticker and there are waiting list for them as well. I agree with Monsoon to wait to buy. It may be that gas prices will fall substantially if in-fact that that market is being manipulated which is what I suspect.

I would bet that moped sales are high right now.

Also welcome to the forum ejb. :)

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i strongly disagree. here is why...

*all based on 1300 miles driven per month at $3.80 per gallon.*

i owned a 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee(paid off), average 17 mpg-monthly fuel cost is $290

i now own a 2003 VW Jetta($177monthly-3 yrs), i average 30 mpg-monthly fuel cost is $164

so$290(previous fuel cost)-$164(current fuel cost)=$126 monthly savings

$177 (car payment)-$126(montly savings)=$51

So, i pay $51 per month for a newer/nicer car, which has 1/3 of the mileage on the odometer, and uses less gas(more environmentally friendly/less emissions).

Theoretical;

$5.00 per gallon!

jeep- $382 monthly gas

jetta-$216 monthly gas

savings-$166

payment-savings= $11 per month payment

Keep in mind this is not a Hybrid or a sub-compact. This is a 2003 4 door sedan, gas burner.

That's why when people ask me what my car cost me, i tell them that it pays for itself.

edit; I religiously keep records of my average mpg with every fill up, so these numbers are not something i made up or trusted from a sticker. These are real world driving conditions.

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i was only talking about brand new hybrids. my point was that some people are blindly jumping ship to hybrids thinking that they are going to save a ton of money. you are correct that trading in a thirsty vehicle like a jeep for a used jetta is a better way to save money. and if you think your jetta is getting good gas mileage, you should check out the diesel jettas. those things get crazy gas mileage! good switch btw. i kinda did the opposite and got rid of my 97 saturn sc2 (well the repairs pretty much convinced me) which got 30 mpg and got a 04 subaru forester xt which gets 19-20 mpg. that gas pedal gets a bit addictive. haha.

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Yeah, i actually really wanted a diesel, but the resale on those things is absurd! Essentially twice the value of a similar gas model. But with diesel priced where it currently is, i'm kinda glad i didn't. Although, i would love to find an old one with a grease kit since i work in a restaurant and would have virtually unlimited free fuel from my job.

I see what you mean about new hybrids. I still consider it to be worth while for people, but i definitely wouldn't get involved in the rat-race of trying to find one, just to pay a huge mark up because of short supply. However, i am dumbfounded by the amount of super-sized SUV's that people are still gobbling up. What is the breaking point?

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