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highriser

Tennessee Crime: Memphis#2, Nashville #4

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This is sad, and embarrassing for our state. It appears that our state is not putting enough focus on this. How can we get our lawmakers and elected officials to take this more serious?

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Rankings

This is sad, and embarrassing for our state. It appears that our state is not putting enough focus on this. How can we get our lawmakers and elected officials to take this more serious?

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There's a painfully relevant article in The Atlantic about the shifting of violent crime in Memphis from downtown to the suburbs. The shift in violent crime corelates to the destruction of downtown public housing and the emergence of its former tennants in Section 8 housing. "Doing something about crime" means suggesting the unthinkable to our politicians; that keeping public housing folks lumped together might be best for their well-being and for the city's as a whole.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/memphis-crime

Your tax dollars at work.

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Chattanooga has seen a recent spike, inspiring this cartoon in the Times Free Press.

Cartoon.jpg

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You can't end poverty by spacing the poor out. And even if you removed them entirely a different set would move in and fall in their place. Someone's gotta flip burgers and mop floors for cheap.

As long as unskilled work is so chronically underpaid, there will be people that don't have enough to live without assistance. Social dysfunction is the natural outgrowth of this feeling of worthlessness.

Poverty isn't the government's problem to solve; it's the employer's.

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