Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

cloudship

Getting to Fenway

7 posts in this topic

I know this isn't really an urban issue, but I am desperate here. And I guess in a little way maybe it is.

Anyway, my parents got tickets to the Red Sox this weekend. My parents are young enough to be able to get around themselves a bit, but they are not city folk, and are a little too old to easily adapt to getting around the city. So, I have to drive them into Boston for the game. My problem is how to get them to Fenway Park itself. I could always tell them to take the green line, but I am very uncomfortable with them trying to navigate Kenmore Square and get both to the game, as well as handle a crowded Green Line after the game on their own. The Train doesn't work because there is a huge break between the 6:00 train and the 11:00 train. And even I am not going to try driving around Fenway right before or after a game. Any other ideas? How would you handle telling someone who really is a bit uncomfortable on their own how to get around Boston?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The crowds are just difficult anyway, so it's going to be overwhelming no matter what.

Perhaps drive into Boston, park somewhere away from Fenway and Kenmore Square, then take a cab to the park? That's probably the best I can think of. Green Line is probably your next best option, get off at Kenmore and once you pass through the turnstiles go left and come up on Comm Ave on the southern side of the street. Take a left coming out of the station, then all you would have to do is follow the sidewalk around.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&...006652&z=17

There's also apparently a bus from Ruggles to Fenway, that's on the Orange/Commuter Line.

The trains will be packed, but it's probably better that than having to walk a distance and figure where exactly you are. On Sunday when I go to the game, I'll probably park off Huntington Avenue, then walk up Mass Ave to Boylston to Ipswich and come up at right field gates on the back side of Lansdowne.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I ended up driving my parents in. Wasn't as bad as I had expected at least. Traffic but not total chaos. At least not before I arrived.

But this whole thing really hit on a big point, especially for Boston. It seems that the attitude in Boston is that you are either going to do things the Bostonian way - have no relation to the world outside of 128, be completely and totally comfortable navigating the city and subways even in crowds, and build you entire life around the city, or not be part of the city. I think that is why I find Boston's public transit so hard to deal with. The fact is many of us live outside the city and only come in occasionally. We want to use public transit. But they are so dead set against anything on rubber wheels that they refuse to have much interface with cars, and thus you have to choose between driving for everything or taking transit for everything., Well, guess what a lot of people do?

It wouldn't even be that hard. Something like the Soxs, for instance - why don't they run buses from nearby cities and towns so people don't have to drive in? Why don't they run special game day trains back and forth between South Station, back bay, and Yawkey? Even add Riverside to that so people can parj there and ride in - the tracks go there. It just seems to me to be such a poorly thought out system. If they really want to get people out of the cars, then they have to start working with those people instead of fighting them off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people who live within 128 have no reason to go outside 128, or at least very often. Considering there's a decent public transit system, with all its issues, there's no real need for many people to have cars. My best friend graduated from Northeastern. Everything was a hop on the Green Line and/or a short walk away. In the two years he lived in Boston, the only time he ever needed a car was to drive back to Connecticut.

Every time I go to Boston, I dump the car off at Riverside or some parking garage I know close to the Pike ... then everything else is T. I wouldn't want to drive around in Boston, considering all the other cars who go around with reckless abandon, the pedestrians and bicylists who pull out right in front of you, and horrific to follow street layout and signage. (Oh wait, there barely are signs.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But they don't even make the parking easily accessible. Coming from the west you can do either Riverside, which is not too bad, but takes forever to get into the city and eats up all your time, or you have to make your way to Alewife, which is only really convenient for those who navigate Route 2. There should be a really good park and ride set up near Riverside, and from there an express train right to South Station.

And again, a lot of people aren't that familiar with Boston. the Stations are usually not located where you need them, and it is so hard to figure out where you have to go and through unfamiliar and scary neighborhoods that you simply avoid taking the T at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can be tough. I understand. I took my mother a few times to Boston last fall, she had no idea what to do or how to get around. It had been a decade since she was last up there, before I brought her along for a few daytrips. I got asked "how do you know this??" at least once every half hour. I've been up there plenty of times and know how to get around, I'm fortunate. While I am familiar with the system, I do agree more needs to be done to make the place more accessible to outsiders.

The MBTA never seemed to be as friendly to casual users as systems in other cities (like New York). In New York, there's public transit all over the place, constantly operating, and people down there seem to be more familiar with the system. In Boston, commuter rail is badly set up. It is set up favoring 9-5 workers with jobs in Boston, and the trains run slow/late. If you want a weekend day trip or an evening out in town... forget it, the schedule doesn't like you.

And I could go on for a while about how baffling the current Worcester line setup is. In my mind, there is no train service west of Framingham... the connection to/from Worcester is that bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Yeah, sometimes I wonder if DMUs (diesel multiple units) would be better suited to handle some of the commuter rail lines, given the low volume on weekends and midday. Perhaps running smaller, lighter, and more fuel efficient DMUs more frequently would help solve the problems with inconvenient schedules and not-so-full trains during off-peak times. Then again, it is the COMMUTER rail and is designed with the workday commuter in mind. But for sure, getting people out of cars is definitely the main goal.

As far as getting to Fenway goes, you know the game is sold out, you know to expect huge crowds around the ballpark and on the trains. One of the best ways to avoid a huge jam is to seek out a meter on Comm. Ave in the Allston/BU area and hop on the B line to Blandford Street, one stop before Kenmore and hoof it to Fenway. It's not a bad walk at all - maybe 50% longer than the walk from Kenmore. If you're willing to drive a little out of the way, there's always parking at Quincy Adams station near the intersections of 93 and the southeast expressway (3).

In my opinion there are way too many cars in the Boston area. The MBTA's rapid transit system is in need of some expansions, for sure, but still many residents haven't embraced public transit around here. I'd also like to see the MBTA start running 24 hours a day, if for no other reason than to keep drunk drivers from getting behind the wheel. But we'll save that for another conversation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.