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Lake Nona - Medical City


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7 minutes ago, spenser1058 said:

Actually, Cobb is in the process of flipping. The hardcore spots now are like Sandy Springs. It’s like an Ayn Rand novel in some of those new towns.

Those people wouldn't know objectivism if it smacked them in the face. 

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Just now, jrs2 said:

well, the flip side to that coin is that people don't want to live near the ghetto.  and that's where the demand comes from for suburban communities and it's as simple as that, greedy developers aside.  It's not just here.  It's everywhere.  even in Western Europe and the PACNW.

To each their own. I’d rather live a couple blocks from Parramore than in a Stepford wonderland. Which is pretty much what I’ve done for decades after escaping the ‘burbs

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26 minutes ago, spenser1058 said:

To each their own. I’d rather live a couple blocks from Parramore than in a Stepford wonderland. Which is pretty much what I’ve done for decades after escaping the ‘burbs

Most people don’t share your sentiment, I’d imagine. Just thinking logically and financially, what sense would it make to purchase property in an area that has high crime and low appreciation if one can afford better?

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6 minutes ago, Uncommon said:

Most people don’t share your sentiment, I’d imagine. Just thinking logically and financially, what sense would it make to purchase property in an area that has high crime and low appreciation if one can afford better?

It’s all of the folks who live in actual urban areas. It was also the concept of urban pioneers, a concept that has died in Orlando but brought back neighborhoods all over the country. Instead of tearing down and building sterile boxes, restore what made those areas special in the first place.

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Although many of us do wish this was closer to the urban core, Lake Nona will certainly evolve into a prominent "edge city", which most large cities have. It will continue to help employment figures in Orlando and Central Florida with big name companies fueling diversification and growth of other economic sectors.  The sheer size of raw land makes it seem like there is nothing. To a certain extent, it is still missing grocery, retail, restaurant and entertainment options. 

It is, however, much more diverse than your typical sterile suburb. It has experienced the same diversifying trends of the suburban Southern U.S. and has become a popular area for wealthier Hispanic and Latin-American families (there are many Puerto Rican restaurants and the nicest Bravo Supermarket I've ever seen lol).  Numerous precincts are plurality Hispanic and at least 10% Asian, reflecting the diversity of Orlando's southern suburbs. I would compare the Lake Nona momentum similar to Doral outside of Miami, where many companies and offices relocated there to "start fresh".

Another downside or challenge has been the significant growth that has funneled south into St. Cloud, west into Meadow Woods and Southchase and north towards Vista (the new Storey Park and Meridian developments). A lot of this can be attributed to the relatively higher cost of housing in Lake Nona proper. 

Time will tell where things go, but Lake Nona is here to stay and it will be a large source of revenue for the City of Orlando. 

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14 hours ago, aleonrivera said:

Although many of us do wish this was closer to the urban core, Lake Nona will certainly evolve into a prominent "edge city", which most large cities have. It will continue to help employment figures in Orlando and Central Florida with big name companies fueling diversification and growth of other economic sectors.  The sheer size of raw land makes it seem like there is nothing. To a certain extent, it is still missing grocery, retail, restaurant and entertainment options. 

It is, however, much more diverse than your typical sterile suburb. It has experienced the same diversifying trends of the suburban Southern U.S. and has become a popular area for wealthier Hispanic and Latin-American families (there are many Puerto Rican restaurants and the nicest Bravo Supermarket I've ever seen lol).  Numerous precincts are plurality Hispanic and at least 10% Asian, reflecting the diversity of Orlando's southern suburbs. I would compare the Lake Nona momentum similar to Doral outside of Miami, where many companies and offices relocated there to "start fresh".

Another downside or challenge has been the significant growth that has funneled south into St. Cloud, west into Meadow Woods and Southchase and north towards Vista (the new Storey Park and Meridian developments). A lot of this can be attributed to the relatively higher cost of housing in Lake Nona proper. 

Time will tell where things go, but Lake Nona is here to stay and it will be a large source of revenue for the City of Orlando. 

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

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43 minutes ago, jack said:

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

Lexus SUV's everywhere.

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Stop bullying Lake Nona lol every neighborhood has its flaws. There is no such thing as a perfect neighborhood. We all could nitpick and point out all of the urban flaws in Downtown Orlando and it’s surrounding neighborhoods. Lake Nona is one of the best developments currently going on in Orlando. It’s helping diversify Orlando’s economy, it’s adding another urban lifestyle option for residents, and bringing Interesting design and public art to the city.  Something would have been built on the land where Lake Nona is no matter what…would we rather another version of hunters creek? Or is  a development looking to create a true mixed use, dense neighborhood with building heights up to 30 stories, attracting high paying jobs,  state of the art amenities, higher education facilities, a cutting edge life science cluster not a benefit to Orlando? Why are we acting like Orlando has the urban fabric of New York and that this type of development has no place to be in the region…I just don’t get it. 

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1 hour ago, Urbo said:

Stop bullying Lake Nona lol every neighborhood has its flaws. There is no such thing as a perfect neighborhood. We all could nitpick and point out all of the urban flaws in Downtown Orlando and it’s surrounding neighborhoods. Lake Nona is one of the best developments currently going on in Orlando. It’s helping diversify Orlando’s economy, it’s adding another urban lifestyle option for residents, and bringing Interesting design and public art to the city.  Something would have been built on the land where Lake Nona is no matter what…would we rather another version of hunters creek? Or is  a development looking to create a true mixed use, dense neighborhood with building heights up to 30 stories, attracting high paying jobs,  state of the art amenities, higher education facilities, a cutting edge life science cluster not a benefit to Orlando? Why are we acting like Orlando has the urban fabric of New York and that this type of development has no place to be in the region…I just don’t get it. 

if you want the answer to that question, then start a thread in the Coffee House, because politics is sure to come up as the answer.

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7 hours ago, jack said:

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

Just being realistic here... diversity of income, at the bottom of the range, is not desirable to an awful lot of people, and while there is no doubt a certain group of people who do want it, an awful lot don't want that type of diversity. Thats why many cities have programs to ship out the homeless and literally get rid of them. It just brings a lot of problems, and keeps a lot of other good things that allow the lower-middle and middle class to move on up. If the biggest problem Lake Nona has is there isn't enough poor and homeless people... we should be thrilled.

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7 hours ago, jack said:

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

There is nothing good to come from Lake Nona. It's exhausting that people think so and believe it's a good thing for Orlando. 

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22 hours ago, aleonrivera said:

It is, however, much more diverse than your typical sterile suburb. It has experienced the same diversifying trends of the suburban Southern U.S. and has become a popular area for wealthier Hispanic and Latin-American families (there are many Puerto Rican restaurants and the nicest Bravo Supermarket I've ever seen lol).  Numerous precincts are plurality Hispanic and at least 10% Asian, reflecting the diversity of Orlando's southern suburbs. I would compare the Lake Nona momentum similar to Doral outside of Miami, where many companies and offices relocated there to "start fresh".

About the Bravo, specifically, I have to say that it's only so nice because it occupied the shell of a former Earth Fare.  That's the Bravo MO - to occupy an already existing store vacated by another chain.  I agree 100% about Lake Nona not being sterile, but I wonder what you're hinting at when you attribute that to the presence of Hispanic, Latin-American, and Asian people. What ethnic group in significant numbers would actually lead to it being sterile?

46 minutes ago, IAmFloridaBorn said:

There is nothing good to come from Lake Nona. It's exhausting that people think so and believe it's a good thing for Orlando. 

Time will tell, obviously.  I think Lake Nona can contribute to raising all boats, to include that of Orlando's downtown core.

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8 hours ago, jack said:

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

I was specifically referring to racial and ethnic diversity from a census standpoint after reviewing census tracts with updated 2020 info throughout the area. I know it's not income diverse, and there is a lack of housing options. It's a new development priced at a higher level, it's going to lack income and housing options.  My post wasn't to praise or criticize Lake Nona, just my observations after working and commuting there for a new job in the last 3 months.  

Do I believe it's all good? No 

Do I believe it's all bad? No 

I do think a mistake has been to refer to such a large geographic area as one name.  It creates a lot of confusion. 

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2 hours ago, aent said:

Just being realistic here... diversity of income, at the bottom of the range, is not desirable to an awful lot of people, and while there is no doubt a certain group of people who do want it, an awful lot don't want that type of diversity. Thats why many cities have programs to ship out the homeless and literally get rid of them. It just brings a lot of problems, and keeps a lot of other good things that allow the lower-middle and middle class to move on up. If the biggest problem Lake Nona has is there isn't enough poor and homeless people... we should be thrilled.

Yeah, and Public Enemy Number One is NYC.  I know for a fact they buy people one way Greyhound tickets to Jacksonville to get them out of their hospital system; and when I say people I mean vagrants and homeless. talk about hypocritical.  It's laughable.

10 hours ago, jack said:

Lake Nona will continue to be a great draw for lots of people but it is not diverse. The area may have people of all different shades but it is still pretty homogenous. A community where everyone drives the same type of cars, went to the same schools and makes roughly the same per year is the opposite of diverse. 

take that road extension from UCF Med School to Boggy Creek Road, go south the same distance as the CC is in the other direction.  It's diverse.

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1 hour ago, jrs2 said:

Yeah, and Public Enemy Number One is NYC.  I know for a fact they buy people one way Greyhound tickets to Jacksonville to get them out of their hospital system; and when I say people I mean vagrants and homeless. talk about hypocritical.  It's laughable.

NYC does this to Atlanta too. They do it to California as well. Many cities actually do this and homeless people just end up playing musical chairs. It’s so sad, they are treated like they are disposable.

However, I have noticed an obvious uptick in homeless people here. It seems like almost every major intersection and off ramp has a vagrant begging for money with a sign. Today I saw a new homeless encampment across the water while driving on Orange Ave in Ivanhoe: 7 or 8 colorful tents. Maybe it’s always been there but I just noticed it today.

I know I’ll catch heat for this, but whenever I travel and see these great cities like NYC, LA, DC, SF, Seattle, Austin etc I think to myself, sure, Orlando is not world class like these places are, but one thing it does a lot better is it doesn’t have a bunch of homelessness and tents everywhere. Sadly, that’s no longer the case. Idk if that can be attributed to homeless people being shipped here, or just an organic increase of homelessness in Orlando.

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OCLS is looking at new library branches both for Lake Nona and Horizon West in a deal with Orlando and OC, respectively.

It’s interesting to note Nona’s will be part of a new “Southeast Orlando Government Center”. Hmmm, if Buddy decides to move his office out there, we’ll know it’s official: just like in the old days when they up and moved entire towns to be closer to a new railroad, Orlando has apparently decided Nona is the shiny new bauble to remake our fortunes….


https://bungalower.com/2021/08/18/ocls-to-open-new-branches-in-horizon-west-and-lake-nona/

From Bungalower 
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4 minutes ago, tm68 said:

Do you find it odd that a downtown publication like bungalower reports on lake Nona?  Why wouldn’t the city open a government center in a portion of the city to serve city residents?

I think it had more to do with the library - Brendan reports most OCLS news. I was mostly joking about the government center but it’s interesting they’re doing it at Nona but never did it for MetroWest or Rosemont.

We’ve seen two nearby counties move county governments out to BFE before, so there is some precedent. OC also was weeks away from moving county govt out to 33rd Street in the early ‘80’s when cooler heads prevailed during a spat between Orlando and OC.

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12 hours ago, Uncommon said:

NYC does this to Atlanta too. They do it to California as well. Many cities actually do this and homeless people just end up playing musical chairs. It’s so sad, they are treated like they are disposable.

However, I have noticed an obvious uptick in homeless people here. It seems like almost every major intersection and off ramp has a vagrant begging for money with a sign. Today I saw a new homeless encampment across the water while driving on Orange Ave in Ivanhoe: 7 or 8 colorful tents. Maybe it’s always been there but I just noticed it today.

I know I’ll catch heat for this, but whenever I travel and see these great cities like NYC, LA, DC, SF, Seattle, Austin etc I think to myself, sure, Orlando is not world class like these places are, but one thing it does a lot better is it doesn’t have a bunch of homelessness and tents everywhere. Sadly, that’s no longer the case. Idk if that can be attributed to homeless people being shipped here, or just an organic increase of homelessness in Orlando.

...and this is why Medical City is in Lake Nona and not downtown Orlando.

9 minutes ago, tm68 said:

Gotcha.  Pretty sure the founder of bungalower is involved with a major LN project also.  I think the Orlando govt center at LN will also include a police substation.  And it sounds like both library are pretty much a done deal which is great imo. 

I thought he got a job with the City several years ago

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4 minutes ago, tm68 said:

Gotcha.  Pretty sure the founder of bungalower is involved with a major LN project also.  I think the Orlando govt center at LN will also include a police substation.  And it sounds like both library are pretty much a done deal which is great imo. 

We are blessed with one of the most user-friendly lending library systems in the country. It’s one of our best things here in OC.

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19 hours ago, aleonrivera said:

I was specifically referring to racial and ethnic diversity from a census standpoint after reviewing census tracts with updated 2020 info throughout the area. I know it's not income diverse, and there is a lack of housing options. It's a new development priced at a higher level, it's going to lack income and housing options.  My post wasn't to praise or criticize Lake Nona, just my observations after working and commuting there for a new job in the last 3 months.  

Do I believe it's all good? No 

Do I believe it's all bad? No 

I do think a mistake has been to refer to such a large geographic area as one name.  It creates a lot of confusion. 

I know. It just grinds my gears when using diversity to refer to ethnic make up. 

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4 hours ago, tm68 said:

Gotcha.  Pretty sure the founder of bungalower is involved with a major LN project also.  I think the Orlando govt center at LN will also include a police substation.  And it sounds like both library are pretty much a done deal which is great imo. 

 

4 hours ago, jrs2 said:

I thought he got a job with the City several years ago

 

Matt left his role at the City recently and is now with Lilium, the folks behind the vertiport at Lake Nona.  Brendan's partner is also in community relations at OCLS, so there is a lot of OCLS coverage on Bungalower. 

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4 hours ago, jrs2 said:

can you tell me what the distinction is?

Claiming diversity based on skin color is pretty shallow. It makes the assumption that something that is a immutable characteristic determines who you are. 

In other words, if you have a group of people that have a various ethic makeup but they all talk alike, dress alike, earn the same amount, vacation in the same places, how is that diverse. 

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