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tamias6

Food Deserts

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State law makers are working on a new bill that will offer tax incentives to grocers that expand into "food deserts", low income inner city areas that have no grocery stores.

Article

I never really gave the lack of grocery stores in inner city areas much though until I read this article. But areas like Burton Heights were there are allot of low income households have no real choices when it comes to grocery shopping. This is leaving many low income families to meet their food needs at fast food joints and convenience stores where food is not that healthy as compared to what is available at a grocery store. Will the new bill be enough to end food deserts or will it take more work to provide low income urban areas some real choices when it comes to stocking their pantries?

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..will it give us a grocery store downtown? I'd consider that quite a food desert. Might work in Heartside somewhere with all of the low-income housing.

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With this topic name, I thought I was going to find a discussion on the best place in town to find a good sweet treat!

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When driving by last week, I saw a sign that the Franklin/Fuller farmer's market takes food stamps. I noticed a couple in the vehicle next to me point at the sign and laugh. I suppose it's not something we're used to seeing, but I think that access for everybody to fresh food through a venue like a local farmer's market (or grocery store--not Wealthy Market veggies either) is VERY IMPORTANT. I wonder how many recipients of food stamps know they can get fresh veggies at the farmer's market...likely at a price cheaper than many grocery stores too. I hope DHS is making that known and advising people on food stamps/WIC/etc.

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(Jeff, could you fix Tam's misspellings? I don't need to see any pop-up ads for chocolate!)

The map accompanying the Press article was enlightening. I live a wheeled lifestyle, and think nothing of zipping the 5+ miles to Fred's (Alpine and Knapp's Corner are equidistant from home, and I enjoy riding the routes). Plus I work in the 'burbs, the land of parking lots and PED XINGS that don't align with the non-existant sidewalks. It's easy for me to acquire fresh veg and fruit.

Losing the grocer at Fuller and Michigan really puts a big hole in the options. And so many corner markets are primarily C-stores and party stores.

(How can anyone in the present economy laugh about the need for food stamps?)

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Mixed Greens/Blandford Nature Center has been running a program to teach the inner city children how to grow their own food. My understanding is that Blandford is selling the food from their farm in the Alger area. This probably won't make a dent in what is needed but it is a start to introduce fresh vegetables in an area plagued by fast food. I've also seen Blandford selling at the Fulton Farmer's Market and have bought from them to help support their cause.

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The article mentions Creston as an area in need of/underserved by full service grocery stores, however the article includes a picture of, and snippet about the full service grocery in the heart of Creston, D'Amico's. :dontknow: How many full service grocery stores does one neighborhood need? :unsure: The article also mentions the loss of the Duthler's at Michigan and Fuller. A nicer (place to be) full service grocery store will replace the Duthler's. I would agree that the Heritage Hill area and downtown is underserved. I think compared to some other cities; Grand Rapids doesn

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... I think compared to some other cities; Grand Rapids doesn

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The question would be do the low income urban areas want a grocery store? Most of us would think yes but that might not exactly be the case for them. Also, if one was established, could the people in the area bring it enough business for it to remain reasonably profitable?

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The question would be do the low income urban areas want a grocery store? Most of us would think yes but that might not exactly be the case for them. Also, if one was established, could the people in the area bring it enough business for it to remain reasonably profitable?

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