monsoon

Charlotte's Democratic National Convention

407 posts in this topic

Denver is holding the DNC convention this week and Minneapolis will be holding the GOP one next week. It seems to me that that it brings a huge economic boost to the city and lots of national and international exposure.

I don't see anything in these cities that couldn't be had in CLT. So the question of this topic is should Charlotte try to compete to get one of these conventions, and if so, when should it do so?

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This is an outstanding idea, monsoon. I wonder how far in advance are the conventions already booked? Either way, the sooner the better for Charlotte to get its chance in the spotlight. It definitely would be an amazing chance to showcase our community. Maybe, some additional lightrail could be up and running by the time the convention would come to town.

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I would definitely like to see one of these conventions in Charlotte. I am not sure, but I think during the day session of the last day of the convention, they name the next convention's host city. I would assume the city has to go to the party leadership to sell itself as a good host. Probably, CLT would need to continue adding hotel rooms to Uptown and the surrounding communities like Southend to get it. 4 years ago, I was in Boston during the Democrat convention b/c of business, & all the delegates definitely partied at all the bars and restaraunts around the arena.

Forgot to add, 2016 would probably be a good year for Charlotte to shoot for, to get either party's national convention.

Edited by ohioaninSC

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I read something online that it goes out for bid 2 years before the convention is held. Apparently Susan Burgess wants a Democratic Convention in CLT, there was an article/blurb in the observer a few days ago.

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Yeah Charlotte was on the short list to host the 2008 Republican Convention....but obviously we didn't get it. One of the main reasons was the construction of the NASCAR HoF/ New Ballroom at the Convention Center.

Edited by uptownliving

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I think the real question we need to ask is which political party will get the most trashed, and therefore be the most economically beneficial. Teetotalers do nothing for the economy :)

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^I am thinking that in terms of exposure and economic benefit to the host city, there really isn't any difference in the parties unless something dramatic happens. But nothing dramatic hasn't happened at a political convention since the DNC convention of 1968 in Chicago. It's my personal opinion the DNC events bring a much more diverse crowd and that might be better for Charlotte than what comes to the more country club crowd that frequents the GOP but then again the GOP also brings a lot of protesters so maybe it's a wash.

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^I am thinking that in terms of exposure and economic benefit to the host city, there really isn't any difference in the parties unless something dramatic happens. But nothing dramatic hasn't happened at a political convention since the DNC convention of 1968 in Chicago. It's my personal opinion the DNC events bring a much more diverse crowd and that might be better for Charlotte than what comes to the more country club crowd that frequents the GOP but then again the GOP also brings a lot of protesters so maybe it's a wash.

Not having to travel to go to the protests would be a nice benefit. :thumbsup:

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Not having to travel to go to the protests would be a nice benefit. :thumbsup:

I wonder if Bob Johnson's chumminess with the DNC would factor in. A Dem Convention at his team's home arena is sure to benefit him in some way. Question is does he have enough clout...

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Yeah Charlotte was on the short list to host the 2008 Republican Convention....but obviously we didn't get it. One of the main reasons was the construction of the NASCAR HoF/ New Ballroom at the Convention Center.

Yes we were on the short list. I can't remember the other cities that made that list, except obviously Minni/St. Paul. This fact sortof makes the topic moot doesn't it? Us long timers remember that Charlotte already HAS competed. We fell short on the number of hotel rooms, and probably some more things that I can't remember now.

I guess the real question is...when should we try again? That 2016 # sounds about right to me.

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While I am an Obama supporter and he will do well here, it's highly unlikely that he will win NC. So it seems to me that being a red state we could attract The Republican Convention in the future perhaps. A nice byproduct of large scale events like these are the civic improvements taken by the host cities to look good under the national spotlight. Bad roads are suddenly repaved, more greenery is planted, mass transit is boosted. That would be nice.

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It's my personal opinion the DNC events bring a much more diverse crowd and that might be better for Charlotte than what comes to the more country club crowd that frequents the GOP ...

"Country club crowd" ...

Have you ever been to a GOP convention?

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.....

Have you ever been to a GOP convention?

I was once a registered republican in NC and voted for Jessie Helms and Ronald Reagan. I have never been a delegate to either party so hence have not attended such a thing. I was however at the hotel where Jessie Helms gave his winning speech in 1990 and from what I saw at the time, it could be described as the country club crowd. Very white, very conservative, very well off. In comparison I was also at the Harvey Gantt HQ (also in Raleigh that year) and it was an extremely diverse crowd.

I stand by my words. Maybe you can explain how the GOP is now a multicultural enterprise that would for example accept, for example, Gay people such as myself. I don't think you would be able to.

I have since gotten better sense and switched parties. Aside from that, I think either party's convention in Charlotte would be good from an exposure and economic standpoint.

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While I am an Obama supporter and he will do well here, it's highly unlikely that he will win NC. So it seems to me that being a red state we could attract The Republican Convention in the future perhaps. A nice byproduct of large scale events like these are the civic improvements taken by the host cities to look good under the national spotlight. Bad roads are suddenly repaved, more greenery is planted, mass transit is boosted. That would be nice.

I agree, right now the RNC would be more fitted to NC, but NC will be "in play" this election. Recently on NPR they were talking about the DNC seeing growth out west being a major factor in the choice of Denver. With VA up for grabs for NC coming closer, I could see them wanting to use VA and NC to get more of a foothold in the southeast. Regardless of which convention came here, the hotel issue would be better by 2016 with the addition of the Ritz, Aloft, Sierra, and hopefully Twelve (and hopefully others.) More connectivity with the North and Northeast transit lines would help too. I could see Charlotte as a host city in 2016, but not now.

Edited by InitialD

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The November elections will confirm this or not, but North Carolina is apparently a purple state now, a swing state, or perhaps a light redish state. The demographics of the state are fundamentally changing to an extent that Democrats are on an upswing. When it comes to state elections, the state is deep blue.

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The November elections will confirm this or not, but North Carolina is apparently a purple state now, a swing state, or perhaps a light redish state. The demographics of the state are fundamentally changing to an extent that Democrats are on an upswing. When it comes to state elections, the state is deep blue.

Maybe so and in more ways than we think. I am not sure where Pittsboro is located in NC, but it sounds like its one of the rural areas.

Lady from Pittsboro, NC at the DNC Convention

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Maybe so and in more ways than we think. I am not sure where Pittsboro is located in NC, but it sounds like its one of the rural areas.

Small town on Hwy 64 you'll pass through driving to Raleigh.

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Its 20 minutes south of Chapel Hill and home to Fearrington House, where one of the only 5-star restuarants in NC is located. Its home to many people who commute to Chapel Hill.

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Yes we were on the short list. I can't remember the other cities that made that list, except obviously Minni/St. Paul. This fact sortof makes the topic moot doesn't it? Us long timers remember that Charlotte already HAS competed. We fell short on the number of hotel rooms, and probably some more things that I can't remember now.

I guess the real question is...when should we try again? That 2016 # sounds about right to me.

I thought Charlotte was just one of around 15-20 cities that the RNC asked for "host-city" proposals from...if they were indeed interested in hosting the expensive spectacle? After all of the various proposals from the different cities were reviewed, wasn't the short list down to 2-3 cities, of which Charlotte wasn't one?

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Yeah, we did not compete for the Minneapolis/St Paul one. The Mayor at the time said there was too much construction in the city and we would not be able to host the one this year. He made a valid point.

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I was once a registered republican in NC and voted for Jessie Helms and Ronald Reagan. I have never been a delegate to either party so hence have not attended such a thing. I was however at the hotel where Jessie Helms gave his winning speech in 1990 and from what I saw at the time, it could be described as the country club crowd. Very white, very conservative, very well off. In comparison I was also at the Harvey Gantt HQ (also in Raleigh that year) and it was an extremely diverse crowd.

I stand by my words. Maybe you can explain how the GOP is now a multicultural enterprise that would for example accept, for example, Gay people such as myself. I don't think you would be able to.

I have since gotten better sense and switched parties. Aside from that, I think either party's convention in Charlotte would be good from an exposure and economic standpoint.

I don't think that need a multicultural enterprise to not be a country club crowd. There's a middle ground.

Not that I wouldn't like a few more constituencies under the GOP tent! To answer your question, the party certainly accepts gay people. Not everyone is a single-issue voter. That being said, I certainly don't blame any who decides that in spite of their views on taxes, assertion of U.S. objectives abroad, easing of federal regulation in favor of vesting discretion in state governments, etc. that they would join the Democratic Party because of the GOP's prevailing views on gay rights being obviously contrary to their personal interests and views on justice as a whole.

I agree that the majority of gay people are not Republicans, but they're in the party. They're not as likely to carry the flag - partially because they don't want to and partially because some (not most) wouldn't be pleased to see it. That being said, the Republican party and its delegation is a lot more diverse than you're giving it credit for (solely upper income, white, country club members). If its wasn't as diverse, there's no way they'd have governerships in states like Alaska and there's no way they would have won the White House 5 of the last 7 times.

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... To answer your question, the party certainly accepts gay people. Not everyone is a single-issue voter. ....
Actually it doesn't. Let's keep in mind the GOP has demonized Gays to gain the evangelical vote. The present head of the GOP, George Bush, has tried twice to amend the Constitution to deny Gay and Lesbians equal rights. While this was mostly a political stunt it isn't a matter of being a single issue. It's a matter of life and death. If you don't understand that then I will be glad to discuss it off line. Closer to home our own Mayor Pat McCroy, who also pulls the party line, has vetoed giving domestic benefits to Gay & Lesbian Charlotte city employees.
....If its wasn't as diverse, there's no way they'd have governerships in states like Alaska and there's no way they would have won the White House 5 of the last 7 times.
Actually the GOP has won the popular vote only once since 1992. I think that speaks enough about their support.

----------------------------------

I am thinking now that Charlotte would have been much better served if it could have had an event such as Obama's speech on Thrusday night. 38 million people watch that live. I am not so sure that we would do so well for what is going on in St. Paul.

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Actually the GOP has won the popular vote only once since 1992. I think that speaks enough about their support.

Okay - that encompasses four presidential elections, not including this one. The GOP won the popular vote once, in 2004. That is also the only election during that stretch where either party won a majority of the popular vote. (The last winner of a majority of the popular vote was the President's dad, in 1988.)

The Democratic winners' popular vote margin over the Republican candidates in the other three elections was 0.5 percentage points, 8.5 percentage points and 5.5 percentage points. Note that there was a significant third-party challenger (receiving at least 1% of the popular vote) in each of those years except 2004 (the year the President won an outright majority of the popular vote).

Please tell us: what does the GOP's performance in the popular vote since 2002 "speak" about their support?

Edited by Commoner

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.....

Please tell us: what does the GOP's performance in the popular vote since 2002 "speak" about their support?

This is really off-topic. If you want to discuss it, there is a topic on the matter in the Urban Planet Coffee House. You can bring it up there.

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