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Charlotte area "ring cities"


krazeeboi

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32 minutes ago, rancenc said:

I didn't realize there was a new restaurant/taproom planned on Cabarrus Avenue...interesting to see what the offerings will be.

 

It will be percent taphouse. The owner currently has a location in Harrisburg. He was going to simply expand his operation there but couldn’t come to an agreement with the landlord for unfit allowances, so he decided to open a second facility and found a spot in downtown concord. 

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41 minutes ago, Niner National said:

It will be percent taphouse. The owner currently has a location in Harrisburg. He was going to simply expand his operation there but couldn’t come to an agreement with the landlord for unfit allowances, so he decided to open a second facility and found a spot in downtown concord. 

Thanks for the update @Niner National.  The Percent Taphouse is just around the corner from where I live.  On another note, I do hope the Town of Harrisburg can work out a development plan with another developer for the Town Center complex in Harrisburg.  The commercial side of the development has not taken off like it was promised in the early part of the century.   There are numerous vacant spaces throughout the center.

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Drove around Lake Norman today, in the small community of Terrell (other side of the lake from Mooresville).  Stumbled upon some sort of abandoned community of small buildings next to a church which I believe was called the Motts Grove United Methodist church.  Does anyone know what this was?  Also saw some sort of large house/hotel on Sherrills Ford Rd right near the intersection with NC 150.  I didn't notice how far the building stretched towards the back of the property until I drove past it, so I'll have to get some pics later this week, but it is listed as the T.F. Connor House on Google Maps.  Anyone know anything about it?

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1 hour ago, tarhoosier said:

Yep, CLT2014 has it right. Camp meetings were not only african-americans.

This is the camp ground I have been to several times:

http://www.denvernc.com/rockspringscamp.htm

"been to"=drove past, and through, to examine. In some cases families would use the same cabin for generations. The Thompson cabin, for example. Meetings in summers and when there were traveling revival preachers available. On back roads in this region one may very occasionally find a camp which is how I stumbled on the Rock Creek location. A search for NC Camp meetings will take you there. If you visit be respectful. It is a worship location.

I know it well. My contractor-friend's family has a cabin there.  I told him I was going to sneak over there with a metal detector. No telling how much loose change in those dirt floors.  FWIW, Camp meetings were usually held the first week of August since it was usually too hot to labor in the South at that time.

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On 2/16/2022 at 7:08 AM, tarhoosier said:

Good time to recall that in our region until 1890's "power" meant water. To harness moving water gave mechanical control for milling, textiles, most of the early industrial processes. Coal was far from here and less economical for such use. Birmingham, Alabama was ahead of us in that sense. The mill for textiles, to use our industrial vernacular, meant water running beside or through the mill. When electricity arrived that meant the mill owner could place his mill anywhere; near rail lines, supplier, population center, anywhere. This was a boon to the owner though there was a liability. When water was an element of the process spinning was naturally humidified. Threads remained intact. When electricity allowed relocation of mills the operators discovered the variable humidity caused thread breaks and the loom stopped while someone, often a 10-12 year old crawled into the machine to tie the threads. Efficiency fell, as one can imagine. Stuart Cramer realized this and perfected the "air conditioned factory". Many of us are aware of Cramerton and the Parks-Cramer company whose building is now part of the Atherton property. Air conditioning in this sense means that water pipes near the ceiling of the mill could activate a mist of water when humidity was low and this kept the thread from breaking. It had NOTHING to do with worker comfort.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_W._Cramer

Really interesting! Thanks.   I guess another benefit of the humidity might be less of a fire hazard. I've heard of some of those old mills literally exploding.

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Yes, this is true. Cotton dust can be explosive. The dust distributed in the air in the building can have the same effect as vapor from petroleum. As a son of the midwest I learned the same was true of grain elevators and storage facilities. The dust from grain storage mixed with the air makes a combustible situation that becomes explosive. All the dust particles can burn instantly and the sudden intense oxidation within an enclosed space causes the bomb effect. There are many photos and news reports online about such events. Dangerous ones are the metal grain storage bins on farm property. A spark from a shovel against the side of the metal bin and "BOOM". 

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2 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

Yes, this is true. Cotton dust can be explosive. The dust distributed in the air in the building can have the same effect as vapor from petroleum. As a son of the midwest I learned the same was true of grain elevators and storage facilities. The dust from grain storage mixed with the air makes a combustible situation that becomes explosive. All the dust particles can burn instantly and the sudden intense oxidation within an enclosed space causes the bomb effect. There are many photos and news reports online about such events. Dangerous ones are the metal grain storage bins on farm property. A spark from a shovel against the side of the metal bin and "BOOM". 

all true and add sugar to that as there was a massive explosion in Savannah at the Dixie Crystals plant a few years back.

https://www.csb.gov/imperial-sugar-company-dust-explosion-and-fire/

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