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mitchella81

Columbus Crime! Limiting Growth?

Is Crime limiting Growth in Columbus?   4 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you believe that the spike in Columbus crime limits growth

    • Yes
      1
    • No
      3

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5 posts in this topic

I was just curious to hear the opinions of some of you as to wheather you believe that the spike in crime limits the growth in certain parts of the city.

As is known crime in Columbus is at the highest rates in more than 20 years does this sharp increase limit growth opportunnities in the city. Examples of Columbus crime. Columbus ranks above the national average in crimes including Robbery, Homicide, Larceny & Theft, and Motor Vehicle thefts. Metro Columbus has the highest auto thefts rates in Georgia or Alabama every year since 2006. (explains auto insurance rates) The Murder rate in Columbus averages around 19 annually. Last year that number reached 28 and so far for 2008 Columbus has suffered 26 homicides with 5 of those occuring the past 10 days.

Growth in the area south of Buena Vista road has been slow for years, but at the same time those areas have been known as being crime filled areas. Is crime a factor in limiting new growth in our city and as things continue to get worse will it slow growth in the city? Please voice your opinions and possible solutions here.

Should make for an interesting topic.

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While it's no excuse, crime rates have risen with unemployment. As I recall, the new mayor ran on a pro-public safety platform. I'm not sure what that means, except that there's no one answer to high crime.

I'm afraid that crime has become an issue in town. I've always loved the Wynnton area, and especially Overlook, but I know more than a couple of folks who've moved from there and Hilton to north Columbus because of break-ins. It's a shame because those areas and even Edgewood and the Steam Mill Rd area have some great homes. Of course, all those new soldiers from KY won't be aware of the crime issues and will likely just be looking for available homes where ever they can find them...

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I don't know... Atlanta has horrible crime like that too, but it's booming... that's really the only reason I voted no. That, and because the city does not give developers incentives to build in those areas in which land is limited. The costs to demolish old structures and purchase land in town is much more costly than clearing trees on the North side -- around Veterans, Moon Road, River Road, and in Midland. Most developers see Columbus as a way to make a quick buck. No one really invests much time to develop a profound concept for a building, development (like Columbus Park Crossing)... and come up with really generic looking shopping centers. Other than that the only way to solve the problem is inner city redevelopment. In order to reduce crime, you have to make strides to get rid of these empty and vacant homes, lots, etc that allow for the kind of unfavorable activity that the community complains about. You can't simply complain about something and not do anything effective about it. Inner city clean up and redevelopment is the way to go. Also bring things to raise the property value in those areas too.

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I don't know... Atlanta has horrible crime like that too, but it's booming... that's really the only reason I voted no. That, and because the city does not give developers incentives to build in those areas in which land is limited. The costs to demolish old structures and purchase land in town is much more costly than clearing trees on the North side -- around Veterans, Moon Road, River Road, and in Midland. Most developers see Columbus as a way to make a quick buck. No one really invests much time to develop a profound concept for a building, development (like Columbus Park Crossing)... and come up with really generic looking shopping centers. Other than that the only way to solve the problem is inner city redevelopment. In order to reduce crime, you have to make strides to get rid of these empty and vacant homes, lots, etc that allow for the kind of unfavorable activity that the community complains about. You can't simply complain about something and not do anything effective about it. Inner city clean up and redevelopment is the way to go. Also bring things to raise the property value in those areas too.

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That's probably a good point. In Columbus, as in Atlanta, for example. There's not alot of crime in 'greenfield' areas so those areas are - were - developing fine. The difference is really in the brownfield or redevelopment areas as well as areas of re-gentrification. Too, we may be talking in terms of 1) tolerance, and 2) maybe a per capita issue. So a re-hab trend that was close to underway in the Eastern Heights area west of Lakebottom has stalled, maybe due to a perception of crime - real or not. Too, the redevelopment of Peabody did happen, but hasn't yet sparked a re-gentrification of the Rose Hill community as was hoped and expected.

I'm curious and wonder do you mean, 'like CPC' as a 'profound concept', or as a generic center? Because while it's massive, it's very 1990's typical power center comes to Columbus. Not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just not exactly a 'profound statement', except for it's size. I tend to give alot of credit to Woodruff for it's renovation and rebranding efforts at the Landings and St Francis. Though something more creative could have been done with the old Mansour's space, like lodging or mid-rise condos... Structurally, live/work units couldn't have gone in at St Francis, but it certainly wood be a great location. So would the old Rosemont Shopping Center, for that matter.

It's unfortunate that Columbus didn't pass the TAD. TAD's are how Atlantic Station, Auburn Hills and such were done in Atlanta.

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