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Metropolitan, Midtown Redevelopment

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3 hours ago, kermit said:

:offtopic:
The Lowes in Southend was also a big lesson for the company (although there may not be anyone around in the company to remember it). Lowes understood the importance of being in intown markets and were desperate to find a way. Conformity’s Southborough offered the opportunity thanks to the rooftop parking and adjacency to Dilworth and Sedgefield. Lowes execs were so enthusiastic about this opportunity that they expected to store to have 60% higher sales than suburban outlets (the Lowes spatial analytics crew did not agree with that ‘forecast’). That enthusiasm allowed corporate to OK paying almost 3 times normal store costs to get it built.

In reality, the store performs much like an average Lowes.
 

Southborough is the reason why we haven’t seen any other full-sized urban Lowes since. (They have experimented with small delivery-oriented showrooms, but I don’t believe they have found an urban model they are happy with.)

Closer to the topic:

The should move the Trade Joes into a small corner of the BJ's space and convert the remainder of it to parking for TJs.

 

actually your Trader Joes idea is a great one! 

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4 hours ago, kermit said:

:offtopic:
The Lowes in Southend was also a big lesson for the company (although there may not be anyone around in the company to remember it). Lowes understood the importance of being in intown markets and were desperate to find a way. Conformity’s Southborough offered the opportunity thanks to a large greyfield site which was adjacent to Dilworth and Sedgefield and someone came up with the rooftop parking plan. Lowes execs were so enthusiastic about this opportunity that they immediately assumed the store would  have 60% higher sales than their suburban outlets (despite the Lowes spatial analytics crew not agreeing with that ‘forecast’). That enthusiasm allowed corporate to OK paying almost 3 times normal store costs to get it built.

In reality, the store performs much like an average Lowes.

Southborough is the reason why we haven’t seen any other full-sized urban Lowes since. The company has experimented with small delivery-oriented showrooms, but I don’t believe they have found an urban model they are happy with.

Closer to the topic:

The should move the Trade Joes into a small corner of the BJ's space and convert the remainder of it to parking for TJs.

 

What's interesting to me about that Lowe's is if you are going to have a giant rooftop deck, why have a parking lot in front? instead they have the 'fake store corner' by the light with a parking lot behind.  Just put the real store there and everyone parks on the roof. I didn't even know the rooftop existed for a long time of going there.

Of course the elevator would get very busy... and contractors would hate it.

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1 hour ago, t_money said:

What's interesting to me about that Lowe's is if you are going to have a giant rooftop deck, why have a parking lot in front? instead they have the 'fake store corner' by the light with a parking lot behind.  Just put the real store there and everyone parks on the roof. I didn't even know the rooftop existed for a long time of going there.

Of course the elevator would get very busy... and contractors would hate it.

:offtopic:

The rooftop lot caused some problems when the store opened. The store required all its employees to park on the roof. Subsiquently, when early customers drove up to it, and saw no cars in the ground level lot, they assumed the store was closed (or just weirdly empty) and not go in (suburban store always had employee cars visible in their lots). It took quite a while for customers to adjust. There are generally a couple dozen cars on the roof  (mostly employees). Its quiet enough that I took my daughter up there to teach her to drive a manual transmission.

The outbuilding was intended to be a lawn/garden center department. The active street-front space was required by zoning. It never got used for that because ( I was told) the Lowes risk management people did not want any cash registers out of site of the store manager, so they have only used the building for storage. Employees tell me that it is 'full' of snakes since they ride in on the bails of hay (I dunno). 

Edited by kermit
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27 minutes ago, kermit said:

:offtopic:

The rooftop lot caused some problems when the store opened. The store required all its employees to park on the roof. Subsiquently, when early customers drove it, and saw no cars in the ground level lot, they assumed the store was closed (or just weirdly empty) and not go in (suburban store always had employee cars visible in their lots). It took quite a while for customers to adjust. There are generally a couple dozen cars up there (mostly employees). Its quiet enough that I took my daughter up there to teach her to drive a manual transmission.

The outbuilding was intended to be a lawn/garden center department. The active street-front space was required by zoning. It never got used for that because ( I was told) the Lowes risk management people did not want any cash registers out of site of the store manager, so they have only used the building for storage. Employees tell me that it is 'full' of snakes since they ride in on the bails of hay (I dunno). 

A snake-filled building with limited security in a busy urban area? What could possibly go wrong?

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6 hours ago, kermit said:

:offtopic:
The Lowes in Southend was also a big lesson for the company (although there may not be anyone around in the company to remember it). Lowes understood the importance of being in intown markets and were desperate to find a way. Conformity’s Southborough offered the opportunity thanks to a large greyfield site which was adjacent to Dilworth and Sedgefield and someone came up with the rooftop parking plan. Lowes execs were so enthusiastic about this opportunity that they immediately assumed the store would  have 60% higher sales than their suburban outlets (despite the Lowes spatial analytics crew not agreeing with that ‘forecast’). That enthusiasm allowed corporate to OK paying almost 3 times normal store costs to get it built.

In reality, the store performs much like an average Lowes.

Southborough is the reason why we haven’t seen any other full-sized urban Lowes since. The company has experimented with small delivery-oriented showrooms, but I don’t believe they have found an urban model they are happy with.

Closer to the topic:

The should move the Trade Joes into a small corner of the BJ's space and convert the remainder of it to parking for TJs.

 

learned something new, thanks for that.

1 hour ago, kermit said:

:offtopic:

The rooftop lot caused some problems when the store opened. The store required all its employees to park on the roof. Subsiquently, when early customers drove it, and saw no cars in the ground level lot, they assumed the store was closed (or just weirdly empty) and not go in (suburban store always had employee cars visible in their lots). It took quite a while for customers to adjust. There are generally a couple dozen cars up there (mostly employees). Its quiet enough that I took my daughter up there to teach her to drive a manual transmission.

The outbuilding was intended to be a lawn/garden center department. The active street-front space was required by zoning. It never got used for that because ( I was told) the Lowes risk management people did not want any cash registers out of site of the store manager, so they have only used the building for storage. Employees tell me that it is 'full' of snakes since they ride in on the bails of hay (I dunno). 

damn, on a roll

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On 1/16/2020 at 9:57 AM, CLT2014 said:

It was a big mistake to push the parking garage up against the road and hide the retail behind the wall of parking. It is difficult to see the stores in this center, and Target benefits from being on the top floor with street visibility to Kings Road. It would have been better if the stores were up against the road, they could have window displays and entrances from the sidewalk, with the garage tucked behind. Instead, the BJ's location is a cold, dark, cave that doesn't really entice people to come shop. 

The vacant Staples location across the street has the same problem. Cold, dark, uninviting, and a parking garage from hell. 

Amen to this.  Find the shopping center poorly designed.  Lead with light and window displays, please.

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BJ is open to the public and 25% off. No TP  or paper towels. Frozen food bunkers are empty. There is some restocking occurring. Parking was tighter than ever and filled with shoppers.

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12 minutes ago, tarhoosier said:

BJ is open to the public and 25% off. No TP  or paper towels. Frozen food bunkers are empty. There is some restocking occurring. Parking was tighter than ever and filled with shoppers.

Yes. Very busy the other day. Up to 40% off on certain items too like batteries and all vitamins. 
 

big note: you do not need to be a bj member for this liquidation sale. 

Edited by CharlotteWkndBuzz
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I'm only putting this here because the article is titled "Midtown" but it doesn't feel midtown to me.  I don't know what area this really falls into... in some grey area between SouthEnd, Uptown, Dilworth, and Midtown.  But IIRC, the condo tower they mention from several years ago on this site was the heinous Greco-Roman looking abomination complete with some tiny faux Acropolis thing on top.  I, for one, am thankful that thing never got off the ground.  Literally no details here other than the rezoning, but here it is:

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2020/01/23/midtown-site-once-slated-for-condos-now-eyed-for.html?iana=hpmvp_clt_news_headline

 

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13 minutes ago, Seabrooke said:

Well, I just accidentally clicked the first page of this thread, remembered reading it back in 2004, realized that children born that day are now in high school and are able to drive. I have no value to add to this discussion, only that lol, 

Thanks for making me feel old LOL

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3 hours ago, turbocraig said:

I'm only putting this here because the article is titled "Midtown" but it doesn't feel midtown to me.  I don't know what area this really falls into... in some grey area between SouthEnd, Uptown, Dilworth, and Midtown.  But IIRC, the condo tower they mention from several years ago on this site was the heinous Greco-Roman looking abomination complete with some tiny faux Acropolis thing on top.  I, for one, am thankful that thing never got off the ground.  Literally no details here other than the rezoning, but here it is:

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2020/01/23/midtown-site-once-slated-for-condos-now-eyed-for.html?iana=hpmvp_clt_news_headline

 

no rezoning. Its UMUD by right. unlimited height.

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5 hours ago, turbocraig said:

Diltown.  Ok, I'll stop.

Just got around to reading the recent posts. What is even more funny about my accidental click back in the beginning of this thread than being old is that the debate was on what to call the Midtown area lol... Midlizabethtown was a front runner 

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8 minutes ago, Nick2 said:

125 Baldwin got some updated renderings. But it should be noted that this is is no way a sign of imminent action on this project.

From the clt development Twitter @ricky_davis_fan_21

IMG_20200130_094253.jpg

IMG_20200130_094258.jpg

IMG_20200130_094300.jpg

The surrounding neighborhoods were all in a tizzy about this when it was first proposed.  Are they over it now, or do the developers just not care and are trying to move ahead anyway?

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