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drumsy

Peculiar Old Bridge/Old Tryon St [?]

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I saw this for the first time this winter as I drove down Tryon St, after the leaves had fell. I don't know why I've never noticed this before, as I have lived in and around Charlotte all of my life. Does anyone know what this is or what it pertained to? It's easily viewable if you are on the jogging/walking/bike path.

Old Bridge

This is located in between the major intersections of North Tryon St (US29)/W.T. Harris Blvd and North Tryon St (US29)/W. Mallard Creek Church Rd.

You can barely see it via Google Maps:

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source...mp;t=h&z=20

If you pan north, or zoom out, you can also see the faint semblance of a trail/path/road.

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Yes! I'm glad somebody else has noticed this archeological site. Every time I see it I wonder when it was built and for what it was used.

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Good find. I have been here for 3+ decades and never knew about that. I don't have any idea what it might be. I hope someone has the answer.

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Good find. I have been here for 3+ decades and never knew about that. I don't have any idea what it might be. I hope someone has the answer.

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Darn, if anybody here would've known what it was, I thought you would have. From what I've seen of it, it almost seems too small to be a support for a car bridge, and I haven't seen any evidence for a train bridge.

This piece of land was part of the Alexander plantation, and a graveyard for slaves is closer to Mallard Creek Rd. between Hwy 29 and an apartment complex (you can see a dirt entrance to the property just SE of the apartment complex). Judging by the rebar in the structure, it is much to new to date to the 1800s. While I'd like to believe it was an early 20th century bridge spanning Mallard Creek, I'm more inclined to believe it was used a few decades ago to support sewer or water lines over the creek.

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Looks like a train crossing to me, look how thick those supports are.

Don't know. Cool find!

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Street View shows a Cook Out across the creek (next to Tryon), but I'm having trouble making the Street View reconcile with the aerial, as far as the driveway and the building go. Was there something different there recently? If so, what was it?

Google Earth from 1993 shows the same building as the current aerial. Certainly not a Cook Out, right? Or maybe I'm just not looking at it right.

Regardless, it doesn't look like there's anything spanning the creek in '93. Unfortunately, that's as far back as the Earth aerials go.

Also, Polaris shows two different sets of lines that follow one of the cleared paths on the aerial as shown below. One set is classified as "Tax Parcel Easements" and the other is "Miscellaneous Parcel Lines". Hard to tell if this relates to the structure, as it veers off to the west, instead of continuing down to the structure.

polaris.jpg

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Street View shows a Cook Out across the creek (next to Tryon), but I'm having trouble making the Street View reconcile with the aerial, as far as the driveway and the building go. Was there something different there recently? If so, what was it?

Google Earth from 1993 shows the same building as the current aerial. Certainly not a Cook Out, right? Or maybe I'm just not looking at it right.

Regardless, it doesn't look like there's anything spanning the creek in '93. Unfortunately, that's as far back as the Earth aerials go.

Also, Polaris shows two different sets of lines that follow one of the cleared paths on the aerial as shown below. One set is classified as "Tax Parcel Easements" and the other is "Miscellaneous Parcel Lines". Hard to tell if this relates to the structure, as it veers off to the west, instead of continuing down to the structure.

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Judging by the rebar in the structure, it is much too new to date to the 1800s.

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I wonder if North Tryon was aligned differently pre World War II? Is this bulkhead too far from the creek for it to have been a creek crossing? I just had to put my guess in, really have no idea. I bet some of the greenway planners for meck county have an idea.

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This looks like it was the abutment for an old single lane metal truss bridge like this one:

Rutherford270.jpg

Many bridges like this were built in NC between about 1900 and 1920. Some were probably built before then, too. The theory that this is the pre-WWII alignment of Tryon Street makes sense as well.

From the bird's eye view on local.live.com it appears that the abutment on the opposite side of the creek was being used as a retaining wall for the dumpster or something of the drive-in that was there before the Cook Out. Not sure if that abutment is still there or if the Cook Out demolished it (if they did - that's a terrible shame.)

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This looks like it was the abutment for an old single lane metal truss bridge like this one:

Rutherford270.jpg

Many bridges like this were built in NC between about 1900 and 1920. Some were probably built before then, too. The theory that this is the pre-WWII alignment of Tryon Street makes sense as well.

From the bird's eye view on local.live.com it appears that the abutment on the opposite side of the creek was being used as a retaining wall for the dumpster or something of the drive-in that was there before the Cook Out. Not sure if that abutment is still there or if the Cook Out demolished it (if they did - that's a terrible shame.)

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There appears to be an opposite one where the restaurant is, being used as a dumpster screen.

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From the bird's eye view on local.live.com it appears that the abutment on the opposite side of the creek was being used as a retaining wall for the dumpster or something of the drive-in that was there before the Cook Out. Not sure if that abutment is still there or if the Cook Out demolished it (if they did - that's a terrible shame.)

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Before Cook Out there was a drive-in restaurant (possibly a South21.) The Cook Out was only built on that property in the last two or three years. My guess would be that this could somehow be related to the slave graveyard nearby, but as mentioned before, the rebar makes this unlikely. I'm stumped.

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That's exactly what I said, based on aerial photos. So are you saying that it's still there, and that Cook Out didn't tear it out?

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This piece of land was part of the Alexander plantation, and a graveyard for slaves is closer to Mallard Creek Rd. between Hwy 29 and an apartment complex (you can see a dirt entrance to the property just SE of the apartment complex).

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Mallard_Creek_Old.JPG

As you can see in the first image, Salisbury Rd (Tryon St) took a northward turn just prior to crossing over Mallard Creek, then turned northeast. The faint path/road referenced in my original post that can be seen via any online map program corresponds with this map as well. As to the origins of this map, it is a soil map for Mecklenburg County, courtesy of the United States Department of Agriculture and is dated from 1910.

Mallard_Creek_New.JPG

The second map shows that Tryon St (29) has now been straightened and that the direction over the bridge is no longer followed. This map is a geological survey from the United States Department of the Interior and is dated from 1949.

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Thanks for posting that, I love old maps and how the roads developed and changed over time.

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Thanks for posting that, I love old maps and how the roads developed and changed over time.

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