krazeeboi

Charlotte area population statistics

323 posts in this topic

There used to be a similar thread here, but I have no idea what happened to it so I'm starting another one.

It appears that Charlotte has overtaken Memphis to be the nation's 18th largest city according the Census estimates for cities which were recently released. Charlotte went from 669,205 in 2007 to 687,456 in 2008.

In last year's estimates, Rock Hill regained its place as the region's 3rd largest city and has retained that spot. If current trends continue, I suspect it won't be long before it overtakes Gastonia to become the region's 2nd largest city as only 5K residents separate them (Rock Hill's 67,339 to Gastonia's 72,505). Concord stands at 66,311.

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There used to be a similar thread here, but I have no idea what happened to it so I'm starting another one.

It appears that Charlotte has overtaken Memphis to be the nation's 18th largest city according the Census estimates for cities which were recently released. Charlotte went from 669,205 in 2007 to 687,456 in 2008.

In last year's estimates, Rock Hill regained its place as the region's 3rd largest city and has retained that spot. If current trends continue, I suspect it won't be long before it overtakes Gastonia to become the region's 2nd largest city as only 5K residents separate them (Rock Hill's 67,339 to Gastonia's 72,505). Concord stands at 66,311.

I thought maybe we would have hit 700,000 by now <_< . Maybe next year

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I thought maybe we would have hit 700,000 by now <_< . Maybe next year

we have those are July 2008 numbers, July 2009 Estimates are like 710k or something.

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we have those are July 2008 numbers, July 2009 Estimates are like 710k or something.

How can there be July 2009 estimates and we're only two days into the month?

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How can there be July 2009 estimates and we're only two days into the month?

I should be more clear, they are July 2009 Chamber Estimates (Estimates are not definitive keep in mind) that charlotte will be 710k +/- by July 2009.

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I should be more clear, they are July 2009 Chamber Estimates (Estimates are not definitive keep in mind) that charlotte will be 710k +/- by July 2009.

Sounds more like a projection as opposed to an estimate.

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Sounds more like a projection as opposed to an estimate.

Yes I apologize, projection is a far better word!

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I wonder how many people live in the uptown area now??? I remember back in 2005 they were estimating that we would have between 12,000 to 15,000 people living in uptown by 2010.....any idea anyone?

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I wonder how many people live in the uptown area now??? I remember back in 2005 they were estimating that we would have between 12,000 to 15,000 people living in uptown by 2010.....any idea anyone?

According to CCCP,

13,420 Residents in Center City [i assume this means Uptown + South End]

11,000 Residents Uptown

17,750 Residents in Center City by 2010

25,000 Residents in Center City by 2020

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According to CCCP,

13,420 Residents in Center City [i assume this means Uptown + South End]

11,000 Residents Uptown

17,750 Residents in Center City by 2010

25,000 Residents in Center City by 2020

I am pretty sure that the population figures do not include South End and pertains to those that live within #285 or whatever circular highway circles uptown.

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I-277.

Thanks. I get confused with 285, 277, inner, outer, and now they have the colored N,E,S,W codes. What's next? Can you please explain "inner" and "outer" when you have the chance?

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Thanks. I get confused with 285, 277, inner, outer, and now they have the colored N,E,S,W codes. What's next? Can you please explain "inner" and "outer" when you have the chance?

Actually it's 485 :)

"Inner" and "Outer" are directions. I used to think of the "inner loop" as 277 because it's closer "in" to the city and the "outer loop" as 485, because it's further "out". But now what the term means is just the direction of traffic. The counter-clockwise lanes are on the outside of the loop, hence their direction is called "Outer", and the lanes on the inside of the loop are travelling clockwise, hence their direction is "Inner". This actually makes sense, because you can't really use a N,S,E,W type directions in a loop - the direction would be indicated incorrectly 3/4 of the time around the loop.

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The N E S W codes are just for uptown :shades: which of course doesn't really make that much sense to have, imo. Should've just divided it into the wards.

Edited by Batou

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Actually it's 485 smile.gif

"Inner" and "Outer" are directions. I used to think of the "inner loop" as 277 because it's closer "in" to the city and the "outer loop" as 485, because it's further "out". But now what the term means is just the direction of traffic. The counter-clockwise lanes are on the outside of the loop, hence their direction is called "Outer", and the lanes on the inside of the loop are travelling clockwise, hence their direction is "Inner". This actually makes sense, because you can't really use a N,S,E,W type directions in a loop - the direction would be indicated incorrectly 3/4 of the time around the loop.

Your explanation makes it clear. Now, if only the other thousands of confused travelers could figure it out.shok.gif

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Forbes has a neat interactive map using IRS statistics to show where people are moving to/from. This link takes you straight to Mecklenburg; http://www.forbes.com/2010/06/04/migration-moving-wealthy-interactive-counties-map.html?preload=37119

Not surprisingly, it shows major movement from the midwest and northeast. There is some outward movement toward Texas, Denver, the Northwest and a few coastal SC counties.

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There was another map that was on the Observer's website some time ago that showed that the greatest outward migration was to York County, and you can see a somewhat thick, short red line that symbolizes that on this map. I'm pretty sure the schools have something to do with it.

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Interesting but not surprising. People are leaving the rust belt and the northeast for the sunbelt. This has been going on for quite a while. Other than a few northeastern cities, ie. Boston, etc. most are moving to Raleigh and area, Charlotte and area, coastal Carolinas, northeast Florida, mountains of N.C. and Tennessee, Nashville, Huntsville, Atlanta area, Phoenix, Tuscon, Yuma, Texas and the usual places. It is a fun map.

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There was another map that was on the Observer's website some time ago that showed that the greatest outward migration was to York County, and you can see a somewhat thick, short red line that symbolizes that on this map. I'm pretty sure the schools have something to do with it.

also crime, taxes and traffic as well.

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Some very interesting data in today's WSJ in an article looking at 2009 city population estimates.

First it appears that the census estimates Charlotte's growth last year to be 2.4% (a bit lower than the past 4 years but still remarkably high). This made Charlotte the 10th fastest growing city in 2009. As a resident this number surprises me, I really did not see signs of growth in town this past year -- I must be looking in the wrong place.

http://s.wsj.net/pub...2_20100622.html

The second set of data examines city vs suburb growth (the journal does not discuss how the two areas are defined). The estimates show that Charlotte's 'city" population grew by 2.4% in 2009 while the suburbs 'only' grew by 2.2%. Charlotte was one of 13 cities where the city outgrew the suburbs. The data come from a brookings report by William Frey (which I have not yet read). I suspect (mostly based on Raleigh's explosive 'city' growth rate) that the city is defined as the core county of the MSA while the suburbs are the surrounding counties -- if that is the case then these numbers are less impressive for North Carolina MSAs than the WSJ tables suggest.

http://blogs.wsj.com...n-growth-slows/

EDIT: removed references to MSA and changed to city

Edited by kermit

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^Based on the city population listed in the linked city-vs-suburb table, it is indeed the core/central city, not core county of the MSA, that is counted as the "city." Based on populations within the table, "suburbs" appears to be the remainder of the MSA.

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^Based on the city population listed in the linked city-vs-suburb table, it is indeed the core/central city, not core county of the MSA, that is counted as the "city." Based on populations within the table, "suburbs" appears to be the remainder of the MSA.

Good find! (its been a long day).

That is a much better definition of urban / suburban than counties. However, given annexation laws in NC our cities (particularly Charlotte and Raleigh) will be 'overbounded' in the sense that lots of 'suburban' areas will fall within the city limits (e.g. Ballantyne). This will not be the case in most other states. Because of this these numbers are going to over-represent city growth in NC.

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"In 2008-2009, 13 metro areas — including Chicago, Seattle, Washington DC, Denver and Charlotte — saw their core city area grow faster than the suburbs, up from 6 in 2004-2005."

First of all I think that its a good sign to begin with that the WSJ found Charlotte to be formidable enough to highlight it along with much more established metropolitans. A few years ago we likely would have faded into the background along with our ubiquitous peers.

On a more topical matter, I interpreted the tables to mean that Charlotte (just the city) was tenth among all of the 100 largest cities in growth. And, the metro area was sixth in terms of core city growth as well as sixth among suburban growth. The ranking of our overall metro growth wasn't shown. There is a good chance that we are tenth or higher considering that we rated very highly in both suburban and urban growth. If this this interpretation seems right then it shouldn't be hard to tabulate the overall metro rankings based off of what's given.

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