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30 minutes ago, jednc said:

There may be some truth here, but I think you are vastly overstating things. Aside from this health discussion, I consider NC's population distribution an asset, not a liability and certainly nothing to wish would go away. I look down on places like Colorado and Minnesota exactly because everyone lives in the city and no one wants to live anywhere else.

That's completely fair - there is a lot of personal opinion in the criteria determined by CNBC. I was just pointing out that the criteria they selected is biased against states with a larger percentage of the population in struggling rural areas. The criteria they picked would ensure a state like North Carolina with a heavy percentage of residents in rural areas would rank worse than states where the majority of residents live in urban areas. 

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21 minutes ago, ertley said:

As a native (but no longer resident) of Charlotte, I've always harbored an antipathy to Atlanta--please, no arguments! It's just how I've felt since childhood, like a sports rivalry!  But I genuinely do think Charlotte is going to eclipse Atlanta, and most  other prominent Sunbelt cities, sooner than people think, precisely because Charlotte's development came later.  Charlotte has benefited from being a generation behind, when we've made so many improvements in how we engineer urban environments--and in no small part from looking at what cities like Atlanta and even Houston and L.A. did wrong.  So, when Charlotte hits its next epoch, which it seems like is happening now, it's doing so--as A2. said--by "build[ing] em’ dense and keep the quality of life high (as well as the skyline)."

When Atlanta was at this stage, probably in the early '80s, civil rights were--well--nearly 40 years less advanced (regardless of how much you think they've actually advanced), and climate change wasn't seriously regarded by anyone outside of scientific circles, so it just grew and grew and grew outward--and mainly in one direction, northward, because the South was still highly prone to segregation (not that it's still not, but not nearly so now in cities at least). Atlanta's amoeba-like sprawl north and northeast and northwest is directly tied to the racial makeup of the city's west and south sides in the '70s, '80s and '90s. Charlotte wasn't any different--that's why it was historically so pear-shaped--but because it was a generation behind, it didn't totally alter the DNA of the city. But who in their right minds would even want to walk from lower downtown Atlanta to Midtown--and then to Buckhead, which is farcical--today? Atlanta stretched endlessly towards whiter and whiter suburbs, making it the unmanageable behemoth it is today.

Charlotte's lucky to come later, because it's solidifying its (formerly vibrant, then hollowed out, like most cities) core before building out--at least compared to its predecessors. But even Charlotte's incredible stretch southward now down the Blue Line is nearly (and will definitely be soon) a contiguous experience, that you can conceivably walk block after block and not encounter long dead zones. More importantly, because of the racial progress we have made, to whatever extent, Charlotte is now re-developing in *every* direction from uptown. (And I totally get all the arguments about gentrification, which isn't applicable to the South End but is west and north; but I would argue, even with its real issues, it's better than the former/alternative.) In 10 years people are going to have to debate which way they want to go, for dinner or drinks or whatever: north, east, south or west. Even if Atlanta rectifies some of what it's done wrong, it's just too sprawling to become a cohesive experience.   

When I read about other comparable cities (just incidentally) I'll sometimes look in on their downtowns via Google Street View, and Charlotte's already got a much better, more integrated and contiguous, downtown experience than many of its peers, although it's not as big. And that's the point: By solidifying its core first, Charlotte is developing a downtown that's going to put its peers to shame. (As I wrote in a forum earlier this year) North Tryon isn't as sickly as people think: It's really the library redevelopment that it's waiting on, and when the hotel and Carolina Theatre are done, and The Ellis a block back is complete, you're going to be able to walk a full mile--from 9th all the way south to Tremont--and experience complete, decent blocks along the entire way, with something worthwhile therein. As people keep talking about, there's now going to be a locus of activity at Stonewall and Tryon, in addition to The Square, and I think Camden and Tryon, and/or Tryon and Bland, are going to do the same; and possibly even Tryon and 6th. And even though Tryon is Charlotte's main street, it's only one: Several others will soon give it a run for its money. 

I'll close by saying something Super Controversial. I know the hate for Daniel Levine on here knows no limits, but I'm going to stick up for him, if just to play devil's advocate. Even if completely inadvertently, by keeping those blocks in First Ward undeveloped all these years, it's (at least in part) forced some of this more intensive development along Tryon and thereabouts I'm talking about. If he had gone ahead with whatever plans that would've been drawn up in the '80s, '90s and aughts, there'd be blocks of tired, passe buildings there, and/or some of the stuff we're all salivating about near Tryon might be being located in First Ward instead, with parking lots remaining on Tryon, etc., and parking lots separating them all--like so many of Charlotte's peer cities. And I think--maybe, even if totally by dumb luck on his part--that it could be a good thing to have most of those other spaces filled before First Ward is re-done. (Just something to think about!)

Anyway, I think we all agree, Charlotte is an amazing place to be a part of (or watch) today!    

Fantastic post, thank you for all the effort you put into making it so succinct. 

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4 minutes ago, QClifer said:

Not sure where to put this but if we get a MLS team, they already have their main sponsor for the jersey. Its a bank here in town at 10mil a season.  Not BofA,   This coming from a person very very very close to the CEO

I'd bet Ally or 5/3.  Outside chance of Chase or US Bank trying to break into the region.

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2 minutes ago, navigator319 said:

I'd bet Ally or 5/3.  Outside chance of Chase or US Bank trying to break into the region.

Uhm... you have a new huge bank... that will occupy a signature tower in the heart of Uptown... Truist!

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1 minute ago, Scribe said:

Uhm... you have a new huge bank... that will occupy a signature tower in the heart of Uptown... Truist!

Sure was trying to hope against them as the name has not grown on me and don't want to see on jerseys.  Also they cheap.  My hope is Ally they good people, as good as any corp could be.

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14 hours ago, KJHburg said:

Sounds like AvidXchange is announcing a new building to house it previously announced 1200 plus new jobs from Business NC morning email

""Charlotte's most highly touted tech company is holding a press conference at 10 a.m. today detailing "the expansion and development of the AvidXchange headquarters in Charlotte as part of the company’s sustained growth and continued investment in the city," according to a press release.

It's only been eight months since the company said it would hire 1,229 people over the next five years and invest $41 million in exchange for about $25 million in state and local incentives. At the time, AvidXchange said it had 1,200 employees in the city.

AvidXchange helps businesses automate their payments processing, a technology that has attracted money from investors including Mastercard, Temasek Holdings and PayPal founder Peter Thiel. The company has a private market value of a couple billion dollars and is a likely IPO candidate over the next couple years, an AvidXchange executive told a Charlotte business group last year. It recently made Business North Carolina's list of biggest job-creating projects in the last year.""

I have heard through sources this will be announced next week sounds like somebody read the press release wrong LOL 

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15 minutes ago, KJHburg said:

Charlotte ranked as one of the top 15 cities for business startups with Nashville and Raleigh also on the list from Business Insider. 

https://www.businessinsider.com/the-best-cities-for-startups-2019-7#14-charlotte-concord-gastonia-area-north-carolina-and-south-carolina-2

I love seeing these rankings but I also can’t help but chuckle  at them too because “duh” :tw_glasses:Charlotte and Raleigh and Nashville and Austin have been on all these lists since I was a little kid in the 80s.  They’re gonna be on these lists for many years to come. The sunbelt boom is never gonna stop. Not in our lifetimes. It would take something extraordinary to not be on these lists in the foreseeable future. The future is bright. 

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3 hours ago, Crucial_Infra said:

The sunbelt boom is never gonna stop. Not in our lifetimes. It would take something extraordinary to not be on these lists in the foreseeable future. The future is bright. 

You do know that in the 1950s millions of people said exactly this same thing about Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, Youngstown, Erie, Syracuse, Flint, etc.

Right?

 

Edited by kermit
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Honestly to think this southern/southwestern migration pattern would just stop or even reverse anytime soon is frankly absurd. Plenty of decades of boom remaining. Even sunbelt cities that aren’t as hot anymore are still exploding in growth. 

Edited by Crucial_Infra

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Charlotte’s growth projections show steady growth well into 2040, I know these are just forecasts but I believe the metro is predicted to be home to around 4 million Charlotteans around then.

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