Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

tozmervo

Rubber Sidewalks

10 posts in this topic

An article in the O mentions that the city is testing rubber sidewalks at two locations right now - 1200 The Plaza and 600 W 28th St, both in front of fire stations. They use recycled tires, are supposed to be easier to install and maintain, and are porous enough to allow water to pass through. Treehugger covered the topic four years ago and NPR three years ago.

The concept is intriguing, and rather poetic when you think about it - the untold millions of old car tires going toward cheaper and friendlier sidewalks. I'm interested to see how this turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


They make rubber mulch out of this too (usually used in playgrounds) - and it comes in a couple colors: like red seems like a good one for sidewalks maybe. I've seen this used as a compacted surface too - it can be slippery when wet (not unlike Bon Jovi).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I've seen this stuff on a few playgrounds as well. It makes for a low-impact walking surface and just plain low-impact in case someone falls or trips!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen some of these in parts of Myrtle Beach. They are certainly easier on people's legs but I wonder how they would hold up in the long run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've seen some of these in parts of Myrtle Beach. They are certainly easier on people's legs but I wonder how they would hold up in the long run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I was at a new Firestone Auto Maintenance Facility here in Nashville (Smyrna) last night getting new tires. The place just opened a few months ago. They had these sidewalks around the place and a sign inside about there efforts to go "Green". Besides the sidewalks they had recycled concrete that was supposed to be very reflective so it didn't absorb heat, along with rubber mulch, native drought tolerant plants with no sprinkler system and a reflective roof. The sidewalks were reddish brown and not unattractive. It felt good walking on it. Not bouncy at all. Kind of shock aborbing. As I sat there waiting several people asked about the sidewalks. If nothing else it created some interest among customers who seemed to really like the idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do sound pretty nice, but at 4 times the cost of concrete, I don't think it'll be on the city's priority list any time soon, except for possibly special situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.