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Veloise

Planning assn's Great Places

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I saw Traverse City and Ann Arbor listed under "Great Streets", but not Charlevoix.

Was I looking at the wrong list?

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I think Charlevoix is under Great Public Places for East Park (Not that great of a park IMHO)

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Traverse City photos

Had an appointment there, so I spent some time on Front Street and nearby.

First, the wayfinding signs.

tc-way1.jpg

tc-way2.jpg

tc-way3.jpg

tc-way4.jpg

Check out the name for the bus!

tc-way5.jpg

This one is old. I guess they are nostalgic.

tc-way6.jpg

Wonder if this would work here.

tc-pay.jpg

And now a meander down Front Street.

Pocket park #1

tc-2.jpg

Fairly nice product, out on the sidewalk to attract passers-by. (This was about 4 pm last Friday.)

tc-3.jpg

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DT bookstore. One of the retailers bemoaned the fact that they had no public restrooms, and sent me here.

tc-7.jpg

Pocket park #2

tc-8.jpg

and a lovely greenscaped wall

tc-9.jpg

More to follow...

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More pics from my promenade along Front Street in TC.

tc-10.jpg

Closer look at this hanging sign

tc-11.jpg

Lots of decorative planters with exotic designs

tc-12.jpg

Interesting streetlights

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Dog amenities

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Lower level retail on this popular street.

tc-16.jpg

Seasonal decorations (shoe store)

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If it weren't for the realty sign, you'd never guess that this is a vacant storefront.

tc-18.jpg

More planters, and a front window decked out for Halloween. The armchair on the left looks like something Martha Stewart found in the woods.

tc-19.jpg

Nifty bulb-out treatment: decorative fencing, benches, historical marker, trash and recycling bins.

tc-20.jpg

A few more...breaking them up enables additional commentary.

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Turned the corner off Front Street; wanted to keep walking.

Even this unfriendly wall has some nice features for pedestrians.

tc-21.jpg

More lovely plantings

tc-22.jpg

This retailer decorated the planting strip in the alley.

tc-23.jpg

tc-24.jpg

tc-25.jpg

Wonder what's behind this modernized facade.

tc-26.jpg

And a look at some street furniture

tc-bin2.jpg

The green bin has several slots in the top, but it is a single-stream container underneath.

tc-bin1.jpg

~~~~~~~~~~

While exploring, I was running through some of the design elements that made this street so appealing.

--High concentration of "drop in" retail selling small consumables. TC has the highest concentration of ice cream-fudge-candy-popcorn-coffee stores I've ever seen. Several stores offered larger items with higher tickets (nice clothing, jewelry, home furnishings) and they were right next to a place rolling out fudge or caramel corn atop a marble slab in the window. Every coffee place offered outdoor seating, and most of the sweet shops had a couple of tables inside.

--A traffic lane, a bike lane, on-street parking on both sides. Multiple ped xings. It seemed that one end of a crossing led to one of the little parks. Fairly wide right-of-way and shorter (2 or 3-story) buildings. Things felt open and inviting.

--Lots of benches, city planters, street trees, bike racks, recycling bins, newspaper boxes, street lights (two styles). wayfinding signs, wayfinding maps, historical markers. Not a street to rush through; nooks and crannies to explore.

--Highly decorated store windows with lots of detail. Open-door retail with items displayed outside. More than one store had the door propped open, and various goods hanging from it.

--Parking everywhere. Get out of your car and wander. Bring your dog. Bring your bike.

--The usual resort town retail with promotional shirts and local souvenirs. High concentration of cherry-themed product. Several stores with postcard racks.

--Front Street doesn't really relate to the bay and the nearby water, but it's easy enough to get there. When you're all bay-gazed out, come get a coffee and some popcorn, and a dog biscuit.

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Turned the corner off Front Street; wanted to keep walking.

Even this unfriendly wall has some nice features for pedestrians.

tc-21.jpg

More lovely plantings

tc-22.jpg

This retailer decorated the planting strip in the alley.

tc-23.jpg

tc-24.jpg

tc-25.jpg

Wonder what's behind this modernized facade.

tc-26.jpg

And a look at some street furniture

tc-bin2.jpg

The green bin has several slots in the top, but it is a single-stream container underneath.

tc-bin1.jpg

~~~~~~~~~~

While exploring, I was running through some of the design elements that made this street so appealing.

--High concentration of "drop in" retail selling small consumables. TC has the highest concentration of ice cream-fudge-candy-popcorn-coffee stores I've ever seen. Several stores offered larger items with higher tickets (nice clothing, jewelry, home furnishings) and they were right next to a place rolling out fudge or caramel corn atop a marble slab in the window. Every coffee place offered outdoor seating, and most of the sweet shops had a couple of tables inside.

--A traffic lane, a bike lane, on-street parking on both sides. Multiple ped xings. It seemed that one end of a crossing led to one of the little parks. Fairly wide right-of-way and shorter (2 or 3-story) buildings. Things felt open and inviting.

--Lots of benches, city planters, street trees, bike racks, recycling bins, newspaper boxes, street lights (two styles). wayfinding signs, wayfinding maps, historical markers. Not a street to rush through; nooks and crannies to explore.

--Highly decorated store windows with lots of detail. Open-door retail with items displayed outside. More than one store had the door propped open, and various goods hanging from it.

--Parking everywhere. Get out of your car and wander. Bring your dog. Bring your bike.

--The usual resort town retail with promotional shirts and local souvenirs. High concentration of cherry-themed product. Several stores with postcard racks.

--Front Street doesn't really relate to the bay and the nearby water, but it's easy enough to get there. When you're all bay-gazed out, come get a coffee and some popcorn, and a dog biscuit.

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Most of my commentary was from the "why did the APA select this street for an award" point of view. I put it here first, then added a link on Cyburbia...then their net-mama asked for a copy and paste.

I would think that taking the highlights of posts, like my photo tour of the non-pedestrian mall out of its context, would not make it easier to find. Maybe develop a table of contents or index.

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Most of my commentary was from the "why did the APA select this street for an award" point of view. I put it here first, then added a link on Cyburbia...then their net-mama asked for a copy and paste.

I would think that taking the highlights of posts, like my photo tour of the non-pedestrian mall out of its context, would not make it easier to find. Maybe develop a table of contents or index.

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