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ZachariahDaMan

Proposed Woodward-Palmer-Cass-Kirby HD

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This is the proposed Woodward-Palmer-Cass-Kirby Historic District. The University Cultural Center Association is trying to get this made a historic district to block Ernie Schaefer's bid to tear down several of the apartment buildings for a 10-story residential housing complex.

Don't forget to check out the Detroit Demolition Watch Thread. I have another building to add to it sometime.

http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,21293.msg479707.html#new

This area as you will see has some fantastic old apartment buildings, I wish I could of seen it back in the day.

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These are the apartment buildings.

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Looks nice

Its just too bad that in THIS city, being an Historic building has no effect on preventing demolition.

There is plenty of vacant land else where nearby, why not just build it somewhere else?

Thanks

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I've been wondering the same thing. There are plenty of places nearby he could build it.

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Yes, he could build somewhere else, or he could just restore the buildings currently standing. It's not like they're in bad shape or anything. Screw that guy right in the ear!

J.L.

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The risk in current-condition Detroit is that 1) any developer, whose bottom line is profit, considers the number 1 rule in real estate: location, location, location. These buildings are on ripe land adjacent to WSU and a heavy-traffic area with lots of potential. The other risk of current-condition Detroit is that many historic buildings aren't in the condition where they are in higher demand, like say the same building in a "Chicago-style" environment. They're traditionally low-rent, high-turnover structures, which ultimately, makes them rather weak when a highly determined developer comes along and recognizes not the building but the land it sits on.

There's going to have to be a greater response to fight this one, as we've seen how well protecting historic buildings on paper is effective. Tell that to the decorative fleur-de-lies' of the Lafayette Building...er, former Lafayette Building downtown.

Could the developer's mission be to gut the interior of these historic buildings and sell them as condos at or slightly above market rate? Probably. Will he? No.

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