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History of Charlotte

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There were early Spring high school games at Crockett Park that year and two boys hid somewhere in there after the gates were closed and horseplay, ignorance, youth, vandalism or some combination led to the conflagration. I am shocked it had not burned before. For those who had no experience it is photographed here:

https://www.midatlanticwrestling.net/resourcecenter/venues/crockettpark/crockett_park.htm

For almost fifty years the wooden structure with steel supports had gas cookers and fryers, antique electricity, cigars and cigarettes tossed onto the wooden seats and steps, all with the dry and aged wood all around. The teens did an act of grace as it disappeared in a trice. No querulous discussions of historicity and such. Poof! It is gone.

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Captain Sully and his tweets in remembrance of Flight 1549.  Tweets from today.

We proved what is possible when a dedicated group of people rises to the occasion, remembers their common humanity, and works together. When we do that, there is little we cannot accomplish. #Flight1549

Ten years later, these are the things that stay with me: the professionalism of the crew and air traffic controllers, the cooperation of passengers, the bravery of the rescuers and first responders, and the enduring love of my family, and I celebrate them every day. #Flight1549

What followed in the days and weeks after the landing was nothing short of extraordinary. We heard from people all over the world who found hope and inspiration in the story of #Flight1549. Many saw it as a bookend to a decade that started in NY with the 9/11 attacks.

Edited by KJHburg
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Never saw so many pictures of the old Brooklyn Village.  I read more about it recently from Observer articles and such.  I am amazed at the density and types of shops/amenities that were in that area.  I wonder how long it would have survived though, without the "urban renewal" project happening.  Some of those houses seemed so dilapidated, and being that close to center city, it doesn't seem out of place that they wanted to make that part of Uptown better, but at what cost?  Could we really see anything like that still in existence today though?  Just thinking out loud.

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6 hours ago, JRNYP2C said:

Never saw so many pictures of the old Brooklyn Village.  I read more about it recently from Observer articles and such.  I am amazed at the density and types of shops/amenities that were in that area.  I wonder how long it would have survived though, without the "urban renewal" project happening.  Some of those houses seemed so dilapidated, and being that close to center city, it doesn't seem out of place that they wanted to make that part of Uptown better, but at what cost?  Could we really see anything like that still in existence today though?  Just thinking out loud.

I noticed some of those houses looked like they were about to fall in. I can’t imagine how they would’ve made it til today. These are the homes I’m talking about. Does anyone know when they were built?

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Thanks Mike. The building in the background is the County Court and Offices Building, 720 East 4th. Register of Deeds is on ground floor and many people are familiar with that office, plus marriage licenses and so on. I know not the age of that building which may help to date this photo.

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12 hours ago, NCMike1990 said:

I noticed some of those houses looked like they were about to fall in. I can’t imagine how they would’ve made it til today. These are the homes I’m talking about. Does anyone know when they were built?

 

Hard to say.  Sanborn maps may not have documented these neighborhoods.  I looks to me like originally housing was built on the main gridded streets, but later smaller midblock streets were added as additional inward facing homes were built .  These look like those smaller mid block streets.  Sanborn shows some of the housing on a 1911 map, but not alot of midblock streets.  I think maybe the boom of the 1920s brought up the demand for more urban housing and additonal homes like these.

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