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History of Charlotte


city123

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  • 4 weeks later...

Part of that history to the Civil War is the site of the cemetery is, or is near the location of the Civil War era Salisbury Confederate Prison. Many, many people died at that prison, as high as 25% of all prisoners sent there! Either way it lead to the start of the cemetery. Good reads for anybody. 

 

https://northcarolinahistory.org/encyclopedia/salisbury-prison-civil-war/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_National_Cemetery

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Does anyone have any information on the roughly 7 story building across the street from Trademark at the corner of W Trade and  N Pine? Is it historical at all? What is it used for now? Is it likely to survive development of that block? What's up with the weird backside of it? I've always been intrigued by it.

 

image.jpg

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That is the Builders Building http://www.cmhpf.org/S&Rs Alphabetical Order/surveys&rbuildersbuilding.htm

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The Builders Building was designed by Charlotte architect and engineer Marion Rossiter “Steve” Marsh (1901-1977) and constructed in 1926-27 in response to the building boom that was occurring in Charlotte and its environs during the years immediately following World War One.  Its purpose was to provide a single home for the principal participants in Charlotte’s building trades. The bringing together of firms involved in the building trades was especially popular in those communities, such as Charlotte, that were dedicated to unremitting growth and expansion.  This concentration of architects, general contractors, and components manufacturers, it was argued, would allow construction professionals to respond more effectively to the increasingly complex building systems that were appearing in urban centers of the United States, including those in North Carolina, in the early twentieth century.

 

Edited by Scribe
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Camp Greene was THE major force in the growth of Charlotte in the teens to the '20's and for years after. At its peak there were 60,000 soldiers there at a time, nearly tripling the population of the city. The camp closed in late 1918 and the population of Charlotte had increased 36% from 1910 to 1920 and then 78% 1920-1930. There was never a rise anywhere like that in our history. The Builders Building reflects the needs of that time.

https://www.ourstate.com/camp-greene/

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The problem with The Landing in Jacksonville is that the city planners have no real vision of what that property could become.   Most envision another park  which would be fine if they would address the homeless in that area.  That piece of land has so much potential but I have yet to see any decent proposal.

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I've heard a few things about City Fair and from what I can gather, it was really ahead of it's time, I imagine a concept like this could do well in Uptown today, especially if it was open late. Offer limited validated parking, maybe offer a covered access from the light rail, or tie it into the overstreet mall some way and I could see it being successful, especially if some high end retail was brought in along with more mid-range options. 

 

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6 minutes ago, KJHburg said:

that skyline shot from  early 1970s is classic not even NCNB Plaza aka BofA Plaza at the square.  Great find.

Isn't that it being built? Or is that another tower? Hard to tell because it's a bit discolored. 

Also, how were some of these taken? They look like drone shots. 

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16 minutes ago, nakers2 said:

Isn't that it being built? Or is that another tower? Hard to tell because it's a bit discolored. 

Also, how were some of these taken? They look like drone shots. 

That crane appears to be putting on the final touches of what is today’s Two Wells Fargo building which was completed in 1971.  NCNB Plaza as well as the Wachovia’s 400 South Tryon were  completed in 1974. So this looks like 1971 to me. 

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I've learned a piece of cool Charlotte history and want to share...

First Baptist Church when building their new building (now McGlohon Theatre) was asked by Andrew Carnegie to match the architectural style of the new church to the library...

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In 1906, members decided that a new building was needed and plans were put into place for a $50,000 auditorium that would seat over 1,000 people. Because the new building was to be located next door to the city's library, Andrew Carnegie agreed to donate $5,000 toward the purchase of an organ if First Baptist would use a design similar to that of the library. The new beautiful church with its Byzantine domes and arched stained-glass windows was dedicated in 1909.

Not only was First Baptist Church originally named Beulah Baptist Church, but it also makes the original library more real, when I pass by McGlohon Theatre.

Also, he donated 10% of the entire construction budget (for the organ but still) just because he cared how the building would work with the other buildings on the block (mainly the library)!  He knew what's what... Wish the city planners those in power that have jurisdiction would care half as much... then maybe we would have less beige/grey boxes...

source: https://www.charlottefbc.org/our-history

Edited by Scribe
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