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https://704shop.com/blogs/fact-friday/fact-friday-186-an-uncanny-49er-campus-cemetery

The name of the county home was Green Acres, not the Oaks, as I recalled. Memory is how history drifts. The Oaks was the home for the aged south of Huntersville afterwards, it too now gone for CPCC expansion.

I visited this cemetery yesterday. I took no photos as it is difficult to see anything but  trees, leaves and woodland detritus. Grave sized depressions in a row  clearly mark the use in one section. Numerous locations are indicated by a simple fieldstone of granite the size of a football, unfinished, set in no particular way. At first it would not cause interest unless one knew the purpose. There is one, single dressed stone in the two sections, the size of a shoe box with "R. N. F." incised. This is the only identification. There are surveyor flags dotting the two sections though several obvious graves are without flags. These graves are the most undistinguished of all. This is the most modest repose and nothing like those across Harris Blvd. I photographed here:

 

University cemetery is more truly a potters field. 

Worth noting that from the time there was a city in the world, care for the indigent, aged, unwell was a municipal responsibility. 

 

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For anyone who wishes to admire the work, life and death of those earliest pioneers who set Piedmont Carolina on its arc of development I recommend the church and cemetery of Thyatira Presbyterian, west of Salisbury. It is worth the drive. The church was established from the synod of Philadelphia Pa, to sense the time and history of the place. 

Continuously used and markers from 1755 onward. 

Thyatira is a place mentioned in Revelations, last book of the Bible. Sardis and Philadelphia were, along with Thyratira, the seven churches mentioned in Revelation. 

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@tarhoosier: Would you kindly be able to describe where in this map the cemetery is? Based on the article it is off the current Phillips Rd, so is it somewhere between that and WT Harris? 

...unless of course you would rather we all trek around on our own to find it ;)

 

Capture.PNG

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At the upper entry of the baseball stadium, EPIC parking behind you, straight ahead you see a walkway to the baseball seating area and trees on each side with a double rail wood fence . The graves are inside the double rail fenced area on each side of the walkway. Very few who visit know it is a graveyard. There is no indication, no marker, historic or otherwise. 

If you continue on Phillips on the downslope toward the field level you have gone too far. This upper seating entrance was situated precisely to allow access without disturbing the graves one must assume.

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3 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

For anyone who wishes to admire the work, life and death of those earliest pioneers who set Piedmont Carolina on its arc of development I recommend the church and cemetery of Thyatira Presbyterian, west of Salisbury. It is worth the drive. The church was established from the synod of Philadelphia Pa, to sense the time and history of the place. 

Continuously used and markers from 1755 onward. 

Thyatira is a place mentioned in Revelations, last book of the Bible. Sardis and Philadelphia were, along with Thyratira, the seven churches mentioned in Revelation. 

Thanks!  I have kin in there.

Salisbury is so historical.  There was an interesting book, "Confederates in The Attic", by Tony Horwitz, that recounts his journey through this area after leaving The Northeast. He meant to just give Salisbury an hour or so on his way to Charleston, SC but was sucked into the local scene. He found the old POW encampment (very tragic story), as well as this cementary after the locals persuaded him to stay a few days.  I recommend this book.

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I have this book:

https://uncpress.org/book/9781469621357/sticks-and-stones/

three centuries of NC grave markers. I have visited a number of them. 

(Ruth Little, who wrote this book above, lived in Dilworth in the late 1970's and did the architecture history survey and wrote the application for historic neighborhood designation for Dilworth which was about 1980-81. She lived across the street from me at that time. She lived the historian life I wish I could have lived.)

Edited by tarhoosier
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3 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

It is gratifying to see the response to this post. I will leave her wiki here. She is buried on campus in Van Landingham Glen. She never married. Her students were her family. Read her wiki to see what graciousness and modesty is in real life. All of us have had a teacher we will never forget.

Spirit of Charlotte? Bonnie Ethel Cone.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Ethel_Cone

Wow, she passed away the same year I had started attending UNCC.  She passed in the Spring and I started in the Fall. I had never known about her until now.

 

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On 2/4/2020 at 10:09 AM, Blakcatfan said:

https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2020/02/03/historic-properties-in-west-charlotte-targeted-for.html

I'm glad to see Charlotte preserving some of our history.  Interesting information about a couple of Charlotte street names that I've never heard before.

The home today is something of a museum, with artifacts from Camp Greene and other periods on display in the house. 

Pressley said he came across the Dowd property while working on the General Dyestuff building a few blocks away and began to learn more about the home’s history, as well as the impact of Camp Greene on Charlotte.

“Remount Road was named because that’s where they remounted the horses, Arty Avenue took you to the artillery range — it was a significant event for the city of Charlotte,” Pressley said. 

(Can't read the article, so I may be restating what they're proposing...) But I wish the Old Dowd House and that block would be conceived as a World War I museum in total, with a primary focus of course on its impacts on Charlotte, but with programming that also talks about the larger effects of the war globally. I wish there was a new museum structure built somewhere adjacent--fronting Wilkinson would be ideal--that allowed for permanent collections as well as rotating exhibitions, including a theatre. Just think of the number of not just documentaries but popular movies--just "1917" this year--and t.v. shows--heck, you could even have a screening of the second (or third?) season of "Downton Abbey"--that could be shown, to lure the people in.

I envision it as a de rigeur part of the Charlotte experience, especially for all of its schoolchildren, like Discovery Place. I'm big, big, big on history, and I'm one of those who truly believes those who don't know it are doomed to repeat it. Problem is, there's so much to teach, schools literally can't (meaningfully) cover it all, so I think it's incumbent upon cities and other institutions to do their parts and make manifest those parts of history that they can.

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16 minutes ago, KJHburg said:

I was just given this book called Historic Photos of Charlotte.  it is really good. Found this photo of the Clayton Hotel at the corner of 5th and Church that was built during War World 1 in uptown.  It boasted 100 rooms just 50 baths and rooms rented at $1 to $1.50 when new.   The Clayton was demolished in 1970s.  I dont remember this but I am guessing it was where the Avenue is today if you look at the slope of the land.  What says you @ricky_davis_fan_21

The Clayton Hotel seen in this photos in the 1920s. 

ClaytonHotel.jpg

Bingo KJ!   Clayton Hotel

H_2000_01_274_06.jpg?itok=wYLAQiVm
Object Year: 
1920
Photographer: 
Jerry Hendricks

The Clayton Hotel was located at the northeast corner of Church and Fifth Streets. Built in 1913, the hotel offered one hundred rooms and fifty baths. Merton C. Propst was the owner. The Clayton Hotel was demolished in the mid-1970s to make room for a parking lot. Physical Description: 8x10 glossy Publisher: Unknown

The Avenue, the 3rd tallest residential tower in Charlotte after The Vue and The Museum Tower, is located at 210 N. Church Street, and is on the northeast corner of Church and Fifth Streets.

Link:  https://www.cmstory.org/exhibits/robinson-spangler-north-carolina-room-image-collection-hornets-nest/clayton-hotel

Edited by QCxpat
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Some of you might remember that the lower level of that building was the sale center for The Avenue.

 

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53 minutes ago, tarhoosier said:

While searching for something else I came across the bijou of all bijoux:

https://files.nc.gov/ncdcr/nr/MK0127.pdf

This is the architectural survey of Dilworth which allowed for the Historic District to be established. 

A treasure of description, history, detail, architectural terms, a true education.

Wowwwwwwwwwwww

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17 hours ago, tarhoosier said:

While searching for something else I came across the bijou of all bijoux:

https://files.nc.gov/ncdcr/nr/MK0127.pdf

This is the architectural survey of Dilworth which allowed for the Historic District to be established. 

A treasure of description, history, detail, architectural terms, a true education.

Love these documents.  Here's the one for Wesley Heights: http://ww.charmeck.org/Planning/HDC/WesleyHeightsNationalRegisterInventory.pdf

 

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28 minutes ago, EllAyyDub said:

100 Lost Architectural Treasures of Old Charlotte by David W. Erdman

I can not recommend this book highly enough for those of you with an interest in the topic of this thread.  My SO (who clearly knows me all too well) purchased this wonderful collection of photographs and essays for me recently, and I encourage all interested in the history of Charlotte's built environment to give it a read.  The author gives a history and architectural notes/significance on buildings removed - for the most part - in the name of growth (though one is still technically standing...any guesses as to which?).  A medium length read, and one I will keep close at hand for future reference for years to come.  @tarhoosier if you have not read this I especially recommend it to you.  I believe the Paper Skyscraper was the point of sale.

Cover and my favorite entry below (don't want to spoil anything, but want to give a taste of what to expect):

a1.jpg

a2.jpg

Thank you.  Gonna go get me and my son a copy tomorrow.  

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On 2/14/2020 at 7:47 PM, KJHburg said:

this is the very first cotton mill in the city of Charlotte.   

http://landmarkscommission.org/2016/10/21/charlotte-cotton-mills/

For a city that many think tears everything down here is a mill just blocks from the heart of uptown still standing proud.  I think Charlotte has done an EXCELLENT job saving most of its industrial heritage, many great old homes and churches even a few of our earliest skyscrapers.  What of course we lost was lots of smaller buildings on the scale of Latta Arcade (which was saved of course) and a few notable highrises like Hotel Charlotte, the old train station, Polk building, Independence Bldg etc. 

However lets celebrate our mill culture because Raleigh has 2 just 2 old textile mills, super hip Austin has zero old mills like we do.  

here are the oldest buildings in uptown Charlotte

https://ui.uncc.edu/story/ever-wondered-whats-oldest-building-uptown-charlotte

Great point.  Is there a Mill tour?  Perhaps ran by a Mill historical society that can use the tour fees to enhance the surounding street scape and tour atmosphere.  If not seems like a no  brainer to me.  Plus its an attraction that can touted as a must see for the near regions of center city Charlotte.

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12 hours ago, EllAyyDub said:

100 Lost Architectural Treasures of Old Charlotte by David W. Erdman

I can not recommend this book highly enough for those of you with an interest in the topic of this thread.  My SO (who clearly knows me all too well) purchased this wonderful collection of photographs and essays for me recently, and I encourage all interested in the history of Charlotte's built environment to give it a read.  The author gives a history and architectural notes/significance on buildings removed - for the most part - in the name of growth (though one is still technically standing...any guesses as to which?).  A medium length read, and one I will keep close at hand for future reference for years to come.  @tarhoosier if you have not read this I especially recommend it to you.  I believe the Paper Skyscraper was the point of sale.

Cover and my favorite entry below (don't want to spoil anything, but want to give a taste of what to expect):

a1.jpg

a2.jpg

David Erdman is a superb historian for this region, not just Charlotte. I attended a presentation of his at the Mecklenburg Historical Association held at Rosehaven, on N Tryon at 36th street. I have heard him on radio also. He has taught me much. His website has a taste of his knowledge.

I know this volume and it is worth the price.

 

 

 

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