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History of Charlotte

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On 8/26/2020 at 5:51 PM, Third Strike said:

Absolutely insane in the amount of homes that were demolished for I-277 and US 74. SouthEnd and Uptown were practically seamless back then. 

I know, I was shocked, looks like where my building is was industrial back then, funny to see the tracks were exactly the same back then. My brother’s building appears to be in a spot formerly occupied by at least 50 homes, sad to see even though arguably his place is a more efficient land use. I also tried to look up my friend’s home, built during ww2, briefly forgetting this was the 30’s, strange to see nothing there.  The airport was perhaps most shocking to me.

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Speaking of Hidden Valley, that community got some national attention during the 2020 DNC which ironically featured more of Charlotte in primetime than the 2020 RNC (A segment of Beau Biden’s 2012 speech at what was then called the Time Warner Cable Arena was also featured).

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Not sure if this has been posted, but Charlotte is looking to add a new historic overlay district in Oaklawn Park. This initiative is currently in the rezoning process: https://charlottenc.gov/planning/Rezoning/RezoningPetitions/2020Petitions/Pages/2020-037.aspx

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On 9/16/2020 at 4:00 PM, KJHburg said:

saw this ad on a Charlotte history page and these homes are now in 150-200K price range. 

 

 

 

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They day after Kennedy was killed, assuming that date is correct. 

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I know two different people who lived there in the late 60's. It was as convenient as possible to the new UNCC campus for staff and faculty. It went from white owners to black some time later, I know not when. My high school took the Hidden Valley area into our district in the early 90's and they were mainly home owning black families, often two parents, at that time. 

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Charlotte's Legacy Commission has completed its report about all of the street names an monuments associated with the confederacy and the antebellum period. Definitely worth taking a look at and providing comments. Basically, most major streets in the older parts of the city are named for slave owners or their families.

Here's the Legacy Report.

Here's the documentation of street names associated with slave owners.

 

 

Probably the most interesting, yet unsurprising quote is:

“Nearly every person-named street that dates back before the 1880s commemorates a family that enslaved people. These include major center-city streets (Tryon, Alexander, Brevard, Caldwell, Davidson and more) as well as avenues in old farm areas that are now suburban (Berryhill, Rea, Johnston and more) and also streets named after US founding fathers (Washington, Madison, Van Buren, Jefferson, Ben Franklin).” It was also observed that numerous street names were associated with the pre-Civil War era and references to romanticized popular culture about that era. (Dixie Drive, Cotton Planter Lane, Plantation Woods Drive, Scarlet Drive, Rhett Court and Taragate Court). "

 

 The commission recommends prioritizing the renaming of streets that honor Confederate leaders and officers, and figures who actively fought against equality. Specifically the following:

  • Jefferson Davis Street
  • Hill Street
  • Stonewall Street
  • Jackson Ave
  • Phifer Ave
  • Aycock Lane
  • Barringer Drive
  • Morrison Boulevard & Gov. Morrison St
  • Zebulon Ave

They do not make a specific recommendation about what these streets should be renamed. However, they do include a list of noteworthy Charlotteans for whom streets could be named and  suggest that Julius Chambers (a prominent African American attorney in the 60s) would be a good candidate to use for changing the name of Stonewall Street.

Personally, I think if we're going to rename all the streets in Uptown (which I would support), I'd like to see a numerical system that actually makes sense, or name all the streets after trees or plants or something uninteresting and uncontroversial (you know, to keep Charlotte boring)

 

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I have posted this before and never expect to make traction on this argument, but, if our forebears in the post Civil War period wanted to memorialize the martyr of that glorious Lost Cause they, in their genteel sensitivities would NEVER name a street for the nickname of the man. On this map of Charlotte from 1935 one can see that there is a Hill, Vance and Jackson next to each other from Stonewall and Morehead and between South Tryon and Mint. One must enlarge to see the small print. Hill Street remains. The Jackson street, obviously named for the Generals no longer exists. I will shout at the wind in this regard.

https://www.mapshop.com/charlotte-nc-wall-map-1942/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAtqL-BRC0ARIsAF4K3WEJ0U25hJBRpWTdZcSqvKvlh7lg6nXuhaEUhWU0NwML6i-Yv8IxDLYaApwxEALw_wcB

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10 hours ago, norm21499 said:

Maybe our ancestors knew each other. One of my family tree branches came to America on the second Mayflower and those relatives helped to found Beacon Hill in what is now Boston. It's fascinating if what I found is true. Sorry to go off topic.

When my great grandfather arrived in Boston in 1635 he quickly headed to Connecticut then on to Long Island the Hamptons end of the island .  My kinfolk seem to like more rural areas except one that worked with William Penn in Philadelphia.   They landed in cities but move to rural areas pretty quickly from what we found.  

Edited by KJHburg
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It was where the parking lot for Beijing Restaurant is now. Mid block on the odd number side of 1600 South Boulevard. I saw "Summer of '42" there when it was a standard run house. In the mid '70's it became one of several in-town movie houses to switch to Asian kung fu movies which were a thing for several years. Bad plots, simplest of story lines and all Chinese with dubbing that was out of syncopation. Horrible stuff. None of the patrons cared. They wanted wham! Bam! Sock-em choreographed action. Bruce Lee was the top actor of this genre but it went down and I mean W-a-a-a-a-y down from him. Nearly all were unwatchable as action movies by those beyond their teen years but hilarious when viewed with the assistance of mind altering drugs. I saw one at the Carolina Theatre, now under renovation, when I was mentoring a boy during this period of his and my life. 

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