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Downtown Orlando Project Discussion

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^^

The Sevens to me looks like they tried to match it with 801 North Orange.  They really didn't have to, but now it looks like a sister project.

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On 8/5/2017 at 4:21 PM, spenser1058 said:

It's been interesting to watch the transformation over the years of Mary Baker Eddy's Boston-centric minimalist Christian Science church into the Greek Orthodox sanctuary it's become. They've been adding more iconography and most recently I've noticed some giltwork along the edges which are fascinating. The church has also been among the leaders in working with the homeless downtown and activities like the annual dive for the cross in Lake Eola are all great additions to the area.

Have you been inside? Totally not what I was expecting. 

On 8/8/2017 at 10:59 AM, JFW657 said:

I am happy to say that I have been critical of that ugly architectural style since its outset.

Not even sure it deserves to be called architecture.

Well, it's mostly wood framing. We can tear them down easily. 

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Just a quick thing to throw out, I recently read an article and then found more on the trend to go back to wood, but more engineered laminates than straight dimentional. Even +400' buildings are being looked at in europe. 

Is that the type of materials being used here?

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37 minutes ago, Boomer136 said:

Just a quick thing to throw out, I recently read an article and then found more on the trend to go back to wood, but more engineered laminates than straight dimentional. Even +400' buildings are being looked at in europe. 

Is that the type of materials being used here?

I heard about a wood high rise going up in Great Britain and another planned for Portland, Oregon.

America's First Wood High Rise Building to Debut in Portland 

 

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17 hours ago, jrs2 said:

wow.  here I go again complaining about the number of trees being sacrificed for a skyscraper in, of all places, the blue city of Portland.

The idea is that it is more sustainable to build with wood vs steel or concrete. 

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If I lived in a wood highrise, every time it rained, all I'd be thinking about would be water seeping into the framing from some exterior cracks, and wet, rotting wood timbers getting weaker and weaker with each soaking.

And of course, termites!!! 

And fire...

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Mel was there for the implosion of city hall in Lethal Weapon 3, which was pretty historic. We were of course big into our "Hollywood East" phase back then which of course went pffft.

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52 minutes ago, RedStar25 said:

I'd hardly call it "historic". 

It might not be any great loss architecturally, but it has been in that spot for several decades of Orlando's history, so technically, I guess that makes it historic.

 

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The interesting parts about it include the fact that it was originally the Municipal Justice Building which housed the City Courts (Florida no longer has those- they were phased out, I think, when Askew was governor.

Also notable was it housed the City Jail (also phased out.) The fascinating part about that was that those floors were left without a/c, and like most buildings from the late 60's/early 70's, had horrendous ventilation which made it a bit of a living h*ll.

 

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Personally, I liked the old OPD building more than the new one. Then again, I tend to like older architecture more than newer architecture.

Edited by orange87

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Yeah, the new OPD HQ is a nice looking building, but I just don't think looks like a metro police dept. 

It doesn't project power or authority or officiality. It looks more like any run of the mill corporate office building.

Plus, it's kinda small. Shoulda been at good 50% taller if not 2x.

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I liked the old OPD building too. Was the architecture considered modernist or brutalist? The entrance & grounds were stately yet peaceful, albeit the building itself seemed haunted... dark & brooding. Especially inside. Still better than the new building which looks like glass box transported from a Lake Mary office park.

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56 minutes ago, nite owℓ said:

I liked the old OPD building too. Was the architecture considered modernist or brutalist? The entrance & grounds were stately yet peaceful, albeit the building itself seemed haunted... dark & brooding. Especially inside. Still better than the new building which looks like glass box transported from a Lake Mary office park.

wow.  bravo. very well worded. 

While spenser1058 writes a history or Orlando, you should collaborate with him and write poetry or haiku or really insightful descriptions of stuff.  I mean that.

modernist?

personally, I liked the OPD building.  I just fear that it's parcel will sit undeveloped for a while.

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13 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

Also notable was it housed the City Jail (also phased out.) The fascinating part about that was that those floors were left without a/c, and like most buildings from the late 60's/early 70's, had horrendous ventilation which made it a bit of a living h*ll.

 

Add in all those desk jockey cops smoking 3 packs of cigs a day inside.

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15 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

The interesting parts about it include the fact that it was originally the Municipal Justice Building which housed the City Courts (Florida no longer has those- they were phased out, I think, when Askew was governor.

Also notable was it housed the City Jail (also phased out.) The fascinating part about that was that those floors were left without a/c, and like most buildings from the late 60's/early 70's, had horrendous ventilation which made it a bit of a living h*ll.

 

Wasn't mold (or some similar irreparable damage) one of the reasons they gave for not being able to save the existing building? 

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50 minutes ago, alex said:

Wasn't mold (or some similar irreparable damage) one of the reasons they gave for not being able to save the existing building? 

It very well may have been but the building had long since outlived its useful life. It really wasn't designed to just be a police station and from what I understood they also had issues updating wiring and it was pre-ADA which is a bear for public buildings.

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If not for the MEC, it would've been kinda cool to have seen the place completely gutted and the old exterior removed down to the concrete skeleton, then have all new wiring, plumbing and accessibilty installed, and finally, re-skinned to create an entirely new building. Maybe even a few floors added to the tower section.

Of course, that almost certainly would've been more expensive than building an entirely new building from scratch.

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