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There were at least 3 trees like that on Magnolia. Their root system is so confined it will keep happening to more trees in storms like this.

The Gym Downtown had their windows blown out too.

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bqknight    88
13 hours ago, popsiclebrandon said:

There were at least 3 trees like that on Magnolia. Their root system is so confined it will keep happening to more trees in storms like this.

The Gym Downtown had their windows blown out too.

So did Oudom Thai and Gaviota Peruvian in the sanctuary building. Looks like their awning came undone and crashed into the windows. 

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nite owℓ    216

If I understand this correctly, I think this is happening because those trees were planted in compacted soil. The city also advocates root barriers so that the roots don't spread out and damage sidewalks, streets & underground utilities. I've noticed the planning board agendas now require structural soil to be used during tree planting (which would allow the roots to grow into the soil more freely under the sidewalks etc while providing a strong enough base for pavers, sidewalks, etc).

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AndyPok1    209

@dcluley98 HA!  I spent like 5 minutes searching for what window created all the glass to no success. 

Here's a few of the pics I took.  Pine Street got it the worst, Casey's got lucky.

 

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-11 at 5.50.29 PM.jpeg

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-11 at 5.53.00 PM.jpeg

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-11 at 5.55.09 PM.jpeg

WhatsApp Image 2017-09-11 at 6.01.37 PM.jpeg

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AndyPok1    209
4 hours ago, codypet said:

Oh no where's the O?

Trust me, I desperately looked around for a hurricane souvenir, but I didn't venture out until almost 5.  I'm sure someone already scooped it up.

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jrs2    374

I know everyone is still in hurricane mode, but I was surfing on Miami development, and, I gotta tell you, they are building down there like it's going out of style.  The foreign investment, and the catalysts that have driven it, the arts scene, the further development of other neighborhoods in and around downtown who's rise in popularity is also driving up demand for new construction, etc.  It's incredible.  The boom they had in the early 2000's is nothing compared to what's being built now, or for the past 5-6 years.

The question is, what types of things can Orlando do the create a demand for new construction?  Downtown has Lake Eola, Ivanhoe, Lucerne, and all three have neighboring developments in those neighborhoods, which is good.  But the rate of new construction downtown is like being on life support compared to Miami.

Miami has the waterfront and decades upon decades of Miami style reputation to build upon, and it has.  The PAC was a catalyst; that arts festival moving there was another.  Orlando regionally can get creative and create similar demand.  The Disney brand and surging Universal brand are good catalysts.  If Mathin could get his 7-star hotel built, that could be a good catalyst project as well.  I know these are not in downtown, but I believe that you can have spillover from one sector to another based on "name".  The Magic Entertainment complex could be a catalyst as well for downtown.  Digital Arts campus also.  They just really need to get moving on these because it goes like this:  there isn't an infinite amount of money in the world for investors, and right now, Miami has most investors' attention.  Orlando needs to get some of that attention here and investment, whether it be in downtown or I-Drive.

I think Brightline will be a catalyst project.  If we can get it connected to Sunrail and/or I-Drive, that will be key.  If I'm not mistaken, didn't Architectonica have  a proposal two years back for a tower off of Garland?  I think they did.  Someone needs to pimp land up here to The Related Group for some projects.

I remember during the boom, Blue Rose and Citymark were two huge game changing projects based on visibility and location.  Blue Rose came close.  If Orlando's boom had just started a year earlier...

But now, for downtown, it does look like Tremont is getting built.  The new Earthfare development is going to be important as well.  We'll see how things progress.

Edited by jrs2

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spenser1058    834

There's a little bit more Miami activity on skyscrapercity. The bigger cities seem to like the whole international vibe over there. Personally, I think the UP site is a lot more user-friendly so I'm glad Orlando posters seem to prefer it over here.

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nite owℓ    216
50 minutes ago, jrs2 said:

I know everyone is still in hurricane mode, but I was surfing on Miami development, and, I gotta tell you, they are building down there like it's going out of style.  The foreign investment, and the catalysts that have driven it, the arts scene, the further development of other neighborhoods in and around downtown who's rise in popularity is also driving up demand for new construction, etc.  It's incredible.  The boom they had in the early 2000's is nothing compared to what's being built now, or for the past 5-6 years.

Before Hurricane Irma, the City of Miami stated "Currently, there are 20 to 25 construction cranes in the City of Miami. These tower cranes are designed to withstand winds up to 145 miles per hour, not a Category 5 Hurricane. " I cannot imagine having 20-25 cranes in the City of Orlando all at once... :w00t:

I think the CV/UCF/Valencia campus would have a greater impact on downtown than the Magic Entertainment Complex.

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spenser1058    834

I know folks on this board have an aversion to the Sunbelt model of urban development, wishing we could turn back time (with Cher!) and be more like NYC or Boston. Generally, that won't happen where there is lots of land. Orlando has an unlimited amount available in all directions. Miami, by contrast, is more like the NE model of very limited space (an ocean to the east and the Everglades to the west.) So, they're going vertical.

The NYTimes also did an article at one point noting that many of those purchasing from South America prefer towers while our most popular international housing buyers (the Brits) prefer low-rise suburbs.

Ironically, between 2010 and 2016, Miami grew by 9.02% while Orlando blew them out of the water at 14.38%. Orlando's doing just fine thank you; it's just going to be a long time before space is at enough of a premium to require the verticality many want so badly.

Edited by spenser1058
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prahaboheme    672
4 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

I know folks on this board have an aversion to the Sunbelt model of urban development, wishing we could turn back time (with Cher!) and be more like NYC or Boston. Generally, that won't happen where there is lots of land. Orlando has an unlimited amount available in all directions. Miami, by contrast, is more like the NE model of very limited space (an ocean to the east and the Everglades to the west.) So, they're going vertical.

The NYTimes also did an article at one point noting that many of those purchasing from South America prefer towers while our most popular international housing buyers (the Brits) prefer low-rise suburbs.

Ironically, between 2010 and 2016, Miami grew by 9.02% while Orlando blew them out of the water at 14.38%. Orlando's doing just fine thank you; it's just going to be a long time before space is at enough of a premium to require the verticality many want so badly.

Totally beating a dead horse but I'll say it again - there is also no correlation between skyline and a pedestrian friendly city.

Downtown Orlando, St Pete, and Miami Beach are all good examples of this.

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spenser1058    834
2 minutes ago, prahaboheme said:

Totally beating a dead horse but I'll say it again - there is also no correlation between skyline and a pedestrian friendly city.

Downtown Orlando, St Pete, and Miami Beach are all good examples of this.

I think that's what we've seen with the explosion of Main Streets and the revitalization of WG, (Delightful!) DeLand and Kissimmee. Now the issue is connectivity between those places. I rarely use my car when I'm downtown and not at work - it's the commute that requires a vehicle (we also need better trail connections to the beach.)

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prahaboheme    672
Just now, spenser1058 said:

I think that's what we've seen with the explosion of Main Streets and the revitalization of WG, (Delightful!) DeLand and Kissimmee. Now the issue is connectivity between those places. I rarely use my car when I'm downtown and not at work - it's the commute that requires a vehicle (we also need better trail connections to the beach.)

Kissimmee will have the connection pretty soon and seems to be taking the right steps upfront to ensure that Kissimmee Station is a successful SunRail stop.

 I do think a western Orange SunRail branch should be prioritized as the next expansion.  There are many cities along those old rails that could benefit from SunRail and looking at the WG example already for their revitalization (Ocooe comes to mind).

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alex    426
On 9/15/2017 at 2:18 PM, spenser1058 said:

...Generally, that won't happen where there is lots of land. Orlando has an unlimited amount available in all directions...

As a city and as a region, we really need to start talking about an urban growth boundary and a stronger land preservation policy. 

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spenser1058    834
2 hours ago, alex said:

As a city and as a region, we really need to start talking about an urban growth boundary and a stronger land preservation policy. 

We do indeed, but the reality is that, even if Orange County were to be as pure as the driven snow, the sprawl just moves to the next county over (not to mention fighting the power the Deseret Ranch owners have in Tallahassee.)

Until there are significant changes in both the executive and legislative branches at the state capital, that's not changing. We HAD significant growth management legislation passed in the 1980's (it was by no means perfect, but it was a great start) but subsequent administrations gutted those rules. Yes, one particular party led the charge to do that but we aren't allowed to discuss that here. (Full disclosure: the state senator I worked for back then was a leader in growth management legislation so I'm very familiar with what happened before and after.)

Within Orange County, Linda Chapin tried hard to draw the line on the urban service area but as the first county chair under the new charter, her power was not yet fully entrenched to do it. The next county leader, Mel Martinez, tried an end run by requiring concurrency with OCPS and some of the roads, but he headed off to DC before those rules got traction.

His replacement, Rich Crotty (appointed by Jeb Bush), simply had no interest in the issue as it got in the way of his career plans. 

We had hoped Teresa Jacobs, whose brand was all about preserving neighborhoods, would be different, but trying to hold back growth wasn't a recipe for success following the Great Recession. More recently, Teresa seems to have been preoccupied with other issues.

Buddy's approach in the City seems to be to split the baby: his administration values density in the core but, in the 'burbs, his approach seems to be that we need the tax revenue through annexing and that won't happen if we get too far ahead of the county.

Next year's OC mayoral election needs to address the issue; so far, we're only hearing names, not policies, though.

 

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jrs2    374
On 9/15/2017 at 6:36 PM, prahaboheme said:

Totally beating a dead horse but I'll say it again - there is also no correlation between skyline and a pedestrian friendly city.

Downtown Orlando, St Pete, and Miami Beach are all good examples of this.

Agreed.   But there is a correlation between skyline and innovation, and development with growth and construction.  It seems like Orlando is on life support when it comes to construction downtown compared to some of these other cities.  The only thing I see is that projects like Lucerne Promenade are potential catalysts for future growth.  Publix in Paramount was supposed to be that, but the only projects built nearby since it opened post-boom are: CitiTower, 420 Artisan, Thornton Park Brownstones, and now Modera (which I don't think is because of Publix).  Is that good, or should there have been more?

The North Quarter projects, I believe, begot each other ala demand to develop or build out that neighborhood.  But that 'hood needs a catalyst project to keep that development and demand going or it will stagnate; and the catalyst project may just be more retail at the base of those buildings- but they're not leased yet.

short of catalyst projects, the only thing I foresee for Orlando in general is that an increase in density of work force and residents will be it's own catalyst for more growth, but that will take too much time to get it to the point you see cities like Miami at development-wise, which have that extra intangible that brings in development demand based on, what do you call it, "hype" or whatever.  Hype or no hype, the money being invested is real.

They really need to get moving on Creative Village; UCF's building(s); etc.  That will draw a lot of new attention to downtown.

 

 

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aent    79
3 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

We do indeed, but the reality is that, even if Orange County were to be as pure as the driven snow, the sprawl just moves to the next county over (not to mention fighting the power the Deseret Ranch owners have in Tallahassee.)

Until there are significant changes in both the executive and legislative branches at the state capital, that's not changing. We HAD significant growth management legislation passed in the 1980's (it was by no means perfect, but it was a great start) but subsequent administrations gutted those rules. Yes, one particular party led the charge to do that but we aren't allowed to discuss that here. (Full disclosure: the state senator I worked for back then was a leader in growth management legislation so I'm very familiar with what happened before and after.)

Within Orange County, Linda Chapin tried hard to draw the line on the urban service area but as the first county chair under the new charter, her power was not yet fully entrenched to do it. The next county leader, Mel Martinez, tried an end run by requiring concurrency with OCPS and some of the roads, but he headed off to DC before those rules got traction.

His replacement, Rich Crotty (appointed by Jeb Bush), simply had no interest in the issue as it got in the way of his career plans. 

We had hoped Teresa Jacobs, whose brand was all about preserving neighborhoods, would be different, but trying to hold back growth wasn't a recipe for success following the Great Recession. More recently, Teresa seems to have been preoccupied with other issues.

Buddy's approach in the City seems to be to split the baby: his administration values density in the core but, in the 'burbs, his approach seems to be that we need the tax revenue through annexing and that won't happen if we get too far ahead of the county.

Next year's OC mayoral election needs to address the issue; so far, we're only hearing names, not policies, though.

 

And, of course, there's the question of what exactly is a fair spot to draw the line. You're hurting property values of a lot of smaller, poorer individuals who the value of their land is basically what they got. The big companies and owners, will use the urban service line to beat down the little guys and eliminate competition, and boost the value of the land that they own... Given thats what goes on, its hard to support the government draws that line for me, as much as I'd like to see more density.

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RedStar25    206
On 9/15/2017 at 7:01 PM, spenser1058 said:

My cousin Rusty is the mayor of Ocoee - I'll have to get him on that! <g>

Well, People in Ocoee aren't very pleased in becoming a new "Pine Hills West". 

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