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Yea, because it doesn't have anything to do with people preferring to pay more money for gas than to rely on broke and undependable CATS bus system or doesn't want to waste money on rail during this r

We're not behind it. Stop wasting money. Sincerely, The public Seriously though, it's not going to happen.

I don't have time to go through how almost all of your statements are wrong so here's just a few: Yes. It's always the tax payers fault when something doesn't work. Cats just needs a few more o

Have you seen the metro rail in TMC, FULL of employees as well as patients, and medical students. Adds time to what? Please don't say to the commute, because we both know how congested that area is already. Ohh now they can take a bus, the ones full of "thugs" that no self-respecting person would ride.

SMD could become a much much much smaller TMC, and part of the success of TMC is credited to the rail and vice versa. When developing TMC, they took parking in mind and minimized the parking to create a market for the rail. And guess what, it worked.

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Huh?? Connectivity...What's that?? :huh: just kiddin'. The Staring extension to Burbank is mentioned...way back pre-Green Light Program...connecting Corporate Blvd to Old Hammond Hwy; Bluebonnet to Coursey; and Oak Villa Blvd to Joor Rd have been the best prior examples...

The Medical Corridor(SMD) is listed as an example in need of improvements to more of a street-grid pattern; the Picardy extension is a positive step...still no word on the Midway Ave; Picardy/Perkins connector; or extensions to Hennessey/Kenilworth out to I-10?? The Rural Life plantation wouldn't be happy.

Connectivity Within City Key Element to Planning

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/Connectivity-within-city-a-key-element-of-planning.html

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I'm not on board. But be realistic, you aren't going to have business people riding on a rail that stops at hospitals. It adds time and no one wants to be sittig next to sick people. They can take a bus.

The city of Houston disagrees with you.

Next time you are there, take the metro. It's a system that I would want copied in Baton Rouge, Memphis, Birmingham, and Mobile .....Houston's metro actually generates heavy ridership considering how new and small it is. It's not quite the money pit other rail transit systems are.

I would want rail transit in BR tucked into the median and timed with traffic signals like that as well.

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The city of Houston disagrees with you.

Next time you are there, take the metro. It's a system that I would want copied in Baton Rouge, Memphis, Birmingham, and Mobile .....Houston's metro actually generates heavy ridership considering how new and small it is. It's not quite the money pit other rail transit systems are.

I would want rail transit in BR tucked into the median and timed with traffic signals like that as well.

Why compare BR and Houston. Tell me a city the same size as BR. That would make more sense.

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Why compare BR and Houston. Tell me a city the same size as BR. That would make more sense.

They are both car dependent sunbelt cities that experienced explosive growth after 1950. Regardless of their area and total population, the population density is relatively the same. Both cities experience the same development problems when trying to create dense walkable communities(nodes), that make transit finically feasible, in an area were suburban sprawl reigns king.

I think its a great comparison!

It should be noted that for street level activity and transit to thrive, its recommended you have a minimum of 15 units an acre, but 40-60 units an acre is preferred. The average suburban Baton Rouge neighborhood has 4 units an acre. Until we up the density around transit corridors, it will never live up to its potential.

.

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Government Street seems to be the most important on the planners list; they wanted this to become a "Complete Street"/ a magnet for pedestrians; residents;local shops; restaurants..a "Magazine Street" type by some hopefuls ...I started a topic a few years back about talk of to a so-called "road-diet" with slower traffic for only 3 lanes with a middle lane(i'm afraid people won't use properly)...

What about Government Street?

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/What-about-Government-Street.html

*check out the pic :shades: all of the overhead powerlines/poles look horrible...that tangled mess should be buried now that Hurricane Season is about to get cranked up!

This brave mom riding her bike in the road with her little kids

Cycling Advocates Hope for Help from Future BRhttp://www.2theadvocate.com/news/Cycling-advocates-hope-for-help-from-Future-BR.html

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How does the city expect to actually change without the future destinations similar to Government St? We're improving traffic and road congestion for what now? Just to shoot this down? Traffic is another major problem, if it's not going to get significantly better then why are we spending money on it? We should be able to sacrifice Government St, which is already pretty slow west of I-110.

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Complete FuturEBR master plan to be released next week

John Fregonese, lead planner for the FuturEBR 30-year land use and development master plan, will be in town a week from today to help unveil the full plan. A 60-page summary of the plan was released in February. An open house with the East Baton Rouge Parish Metro Council and Planning Commission will is slated for 4 p.m. June 21, at the Governmental Building on St. Louis Street, Fregonese says. A second open house will be held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Baton Rouge Coca-Cola Bottling Company headquarters on Plank Road. A press conference will be held earlier in the day.

Fregonese says all library branches will have copies of the plan available for public review, as will the Planning Commission. Public comments will be gathered online at futurebr.com, as well as at a series of workshops that will take place throughout the parish in July and August. "Along with the plan there is a land use map," Fregonese says. "We have used current zoning to create it, so I don't think there will be any big surprises. People will probably be able to do more with their property than they can now."

An estimated 3,300 residents participated in FuturEBR surveys in 2010; and seven workshops were also held to get public input on land use, urban design, housing, economic development, open space and transportation issues. Fregonese's Portland, Ore.-based firm has been working on the plan since January 2010.

*from BusinessReport

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Government Street seems to be the most important on the planners list; they wanted this to become a "Complete Street"/ a magnet for pedestrians; residents;local shops; restaurants..a "Magazine Street" type by some hopefuls ...I started a topic a few years back about talk of to a so-called "road-diet" with slower traffic for only 3 lanes with a middle lane(i'm afraid people won't use properly)...

What about Government Street?

http://www.2theadvoc...ent-Street.html

*check out the pic :shades: all of the overhead powerlines/poles look horrible...that tangled mess should be buried now that Hurricane Season is about to get cranked up!

The comments from that story are rather telling. This is what we're up against; people who want to turn the middle two lanes of Government into turning lanes.

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FuturEBR draft plan unveiled

A draft of the FuturEBR plan, which will guide land use and development for East Baton Rouge for the next 30 years, was released today. This is the latest stage in the development of the parishwide master plan. A series of public hearings to get more input into the plan will be held now through August. The FuturEBR plan is an update of the Horizon Plan and is organized to include elements such as: land use, transportation, urban design and neighborhoods, economic development and infrastructure. Each element contains the current conditions and desired outcomes, with specific goals, objectives and actions that can be taken to achieve those outcomes. A draft of the FuturEBR plan can be seen here.

http://futurebr.com/draft-futurebr-plan-elements-available

http://www.businessreport.com/archives/daily-report/latest/

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