Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

MTSUBlueraider86

The Green Roof

7 posts in this topic

Back in September my sister-in-law was staying at the Hotel Indigo on West End Avenue. She was staying on the seventh floor and she had a nice view of the city, but she looked down on the lower roof as the base of the building is wider so there was a roof below her window. The roof was full of rusty air conditioning units with tar covered gravel and she said "John, that would be perfect for a rooftop garden..." and she proceeded to write that on her comment card.

I agreed, so here is an article which Nashville could take to heart:

http://www.metropolismag.com/story/20100915/up-on-the-roof

BR86

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


It depends on what your interpretation of a "green roof" is. It can be either vegitated as the Pinnacle is or "cool" as the MCC will be. Both are considered "green"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything is better than what many buildings have. Even something as simple as rainwater capture would be nice.

BR86

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Green roofs are a great for many reasons, but most builders don't incorporate them because of the extra costs. This could change if you make the roof a functional space for people. While the roof of the MCC will help with insulation and runoff, it does nothing to provide any additional functional space. I thing the best example is the Icon which includes a cabana and pool(and i hear a dog park). The worst example is the Encore, which is nothing but a bunch of pod-looking hvac units. The building i lived in in midton (very old building in fairness) had a huge roof with fantastic views, but was nothing but tar paper. If it was used as a space for residents, like a gardening area or patio, it could certainly be used as a selling point to renters, therefore increasing profits. Corporate buildings can use spaces for a relaxing spot for its workers (such as Pinnacle). On a smaller scale, low rise buildings can use it as restaurant space/garden as a few on lower Broadway have. I love living in the city, but wish i had a place to grow a few herbs or entertain guests. Nashville is severely lacking in this area.

I really don't understand why this isn't the norm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Green roofs are a great for many reasons, but most builders don't incorporate them because of the extra costs. This could change if you make the roof a functional space for people. While the roof of the MCC will help with insulation and runoff, it does nothing to provide any additional functional space. I thing the best example is the Icon which includes a cabana and pool(and i hear a dog park). The worst example is the Encore, which is nothing but a bunch of pod-looking hvac units. The building i lived in in midton (very old building in fairness) had a huge roof with fantastic views, but was nothing but tar paper. If it was used as a space for residents, like a gardening area or patio, it could certainly be used as a selling point to renters, therefore increasing profits. Corporate buildings can use spaces for a relaxing spot for its workers (such as Pinnacle). On a smaller scale, low rise buildings can use it as restaurant space/garden as a few on lower Broadway have. I love living in the city, but wish i had a place to grow a few herbs or entertain guests. Nashville is severely lacking in this area.

I really don't understand why this isn't the norm.

just an FYI, there is an herb garden on the 7th floor by the grill at the encore. Free to all residents....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The green roof at Terrazzo is a great example. In fact some of our forum readers are landscape architects that worked on that project. Maybe they can shed a light on their design ideas.

BR86

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully this will become the norm as it makes sense energy wise and space efficiency wise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.