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CanalSide


JT Boy

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I haven't been there to see it, but it appears that those pictures don't do it justice. They are clearly not done with it yet. This looks like some projects I've seen around Charlotte in many respects, so I expect this will end up looking better once they are actually finished.

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The beige-factor seems to be contagious in Columbia among new developments. If y'all want to see a good example of "A Study in Beige", drive up Blossom Street toward Assembly, then brace yourself for the blinding display. I actually like the blond brick of the Thurmond Center, and the new Horizon Center buildings that match. But paired with the Coliseum, Adesso, and the Courtyard by Marriott, it's a little much!

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Nevermind, there are some on the website:

108.jpg

In the above picture, although the return of the street grid is welcome, I see no connectivity with Hampton Street headed over the river. That's disappointing to me--does that mean that residents of Canalside will have only one way to exit/enter the neighborhood? :shok: That's like a gated community! :sick: Please tell me I'm wrong, but it looks like the crazy curve currently there marks the only way in/out of Canalside--also according to the master site plan on their website! :ph34r:

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The beige-factor seems to be contagious in Columbia among new developments. If y'all want to see a good example of "A Study in Beige", drive up Blossom Street toward Assembly, then brace yourself for the blinding display. I actually like the blond brick of the Thurmond Center, and the new Horizon Center buildings that match. But paired with the Coliseum, Adesso, and the Courtyard by Marriott, it's a little much!

I actually like the fact that there is some "unity" in the color schemes and materials over a larger area - it is more calming than a mishmash of architectural styles and colors. Have you noticed that they changed the color of the Koger Center slightly - it is more beige and less white now, fitting the color of the new Public Health building on Assembly. But it contrasts with the stucco part of the School of Music building right next door - unless that will be painted soon also. I also don't like the horrible color on the top of the new Discovery Center building behind the Koger. That clashes with everything else around it.

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The Koger is a light creamy color as opposed to the raw cement it used to be. Same with the Pavillion, the apartments at Huger and Elmwood just off of I-126. BTW they are putting $4 million into that upgrade, including some glass around the balconies on the corners. Canalside at first glace looks like cement in places. They painted one of the square bay areas terricotta. They might be experimenting.

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I actually like the fact that there is some "unity" in the color schemes and materials over a larger area - it is more calming than a mishmash of architectural styles and colors.

I tend to like the "beautiful mess" that's created by a variety of architectural styles and building materials. It tends to make a city feel more organic and less forced. The only exception would be a designated historic architectural district.

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I tend to like the "beautiful mess" that's created by a variety of architectural styles and building materials. It tends to make a city feel more organic and less forced. The only exception would be a designated historic architectural district.

I love a city like Bath, England where the entire old city has a similar look. Or Santiago de Compostela in Spain. The whole city is made from the same stone. There is variety in the details, and the subtlety draws you in. It is calming to the spirit. Even a city like Charleston has an architectural unity. I think it is nice to have common elements from one building to the next, rather than just a hodge-podge of styles, shapes and colors, like most cities in the US. Maybe that comes from our American desire to stand out, to catch your eye, to be "special". And the right to do whatever you like with your own property.

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^I like the "hodge podge" because it shows that the city is evolving and growing and not simply stuck in one particular time era. Don't get me wrong, I'm a big proponent of historic preservation, but I think things work best with a harmonious mix of styles (e.g., Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, etc.).

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I think you need to avoid too much of the extremes. Old European cities where everything looks the same are interesting but its more because of the history and the practical issues of building with local materials. I think architectural diversity is important, but not to the point where every building looks entirely different from every other one. Columbia seems to be establishing "zones" of architecture within downtown... the Vista being the most prominent zone with growth.

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Hey, someone with a camera. Go down to Canalside now and take pictures of the section where they are painting all of the bay areas a bright rust color with white trim around the windows. As of this morning they were painting the third one. They look good.

Paint! Awesome. :) Also, I do think they're looking much better with some of the recent finishing touches.

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We had a Labor Day cookout and family gathering. The subject of CanalSide came up, and the concensus was unanimous: CanalSide is horrible looking and is a biiger eyesore than the prison. Dad opined that the place was going to be a slum in 5-10 years. He is usually spot on in such declarations, so we'll see.

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Yes, I do.

Asking around the office seemed to garner pretty much the same responses, too.

krazee, I think it is going to be worse than slow sales. I've never seen a recent project locally that has seen so much universal criticism and derision. I don't think that bodes well at all for sales.

Two other points: It isn't the greatest location on the river, and it is surrounded by superslab.

Any idea when they are starting the townhouse and single family dwelling stage? That *might* save it, but I'm not all that sure.

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They have just put in oak trees along Hampton Street, ling the property from the Taylor-Hampton connector to the esplanade. They will create a thick buffer along there. But each time I ride by, the overall look of what they've built so far grows on me more and more. I am wondering, though, whether they will use the same paint (bright rust color with white trim) on the bay areas showing from Hampton as they have on the interior of the development. That would look nice.

Often, people dislike something new because it may not fit their preconecption of what it should have looked like; then it ends up growing on them and looking nice, as though it should have been there all along.

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I tend to like the "beautiful mess" that's created by a variety of architectural styles and building materials. It tends to make a city feel more organic and less forced. The only exception would be a designated historic architectural district.

Krazee, I agree whole-heartedly. Homogeny is the enemy of cities--it turns them into theme parks. :sick:

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