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Nashville Bits and Pieces


smeagolsfree

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58 minutes ago, donNdonelson2 said:

Remember that in 1950 Nashville’s population count would have included only those persons living within the old city limits, not the entire county as today.

That has nothing to do with the metropolitan area.  I know today "Metro" refers to the metropolitan government of Nashville-Davidson County, but the "Nashville metropolitan statistical area" refers to the city of Nashville and its suburbs which in 1950 included just Davidson County which in 1950 had a population of 321,758.

Here are the 1950 population figures for the counties included in today's Nashville MSA vs 2017 estimates (listed according to 1950 populations):

  1. Davidson - 321,758 - 691,243
  2. Rutherford - 40,696 - 317, 157
  3. Maury - 40,368 - 92,163
  4. Sumner - 33,533 - 183,545
  5. Robertson - 27,024 - 70,177
  6. Wilson - 26,318 - 136,442
  7. Williamson - 24,307 - 226,257
  8. Dickson - 18,805 - 52,853
  9. Smith - 14,098 - 19,636
  10. Hickman - 13,353 - 24,864
  11. Cannon - 9,174 - 14,216
  12. Cheatham - 9,167 - 40,330
  13. Trousdale - 5,520 - 10,083

TOTAL - 584,121 (1950) - 1,878,966 (2017)

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14 minutes ago, nashville_bound said:

Nice French tourism film of Tennessee circa 1947

 

J'adore ça!

A couple of interesting things:

The narrator kept referring to Middle Tennessee as "bluegrass country" ("le pays de l'herbe bleue").  And the War Memorial Building back then had America's largest collection of WW1 memorabilia.  What happened to it?

It also made me sad to see how Gatlinburg has changed.  

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1 hour ago, grilled_cheese said:

Thanks for sharing this. I’ve never been a huge festival fan but it was interesting and enlightening to read about the evolution of this festival, especially since so many of my friends were or are such devoted attendees. 

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3 hours ago, grilled_cheese said:

That was a great article. I've been to 'Roo every year for the past 7. I'm sitting this one out - as well. Bonnaroo has changed. Enough singular experiences at the farm for multiple lifetimes. But I'm old (& picky) - and Pilgrimage Fest is ridiculously easier, cheaper...and well curated.  Hopefully, I'll return to Bonnaroo in the future.

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I think that, given all of the competition it has in the festival world these days,  it was all but inevitable that eventually Bonnaroo was going to  start signing on more major pop acts in an effort to maintain it's reputation as one of the 'major' stateside festivals.  I'm not saying I necessarily like it, but I don't blame them either.  I think they're doing a pretty good job of riding that line between mainstream and cutting edge.  

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8 hours ago, grilled_cheese said:

I know people have criticized the recent Bonnaroo lineups for not being exclusive or unique anymore, especially after Live Nation took the reins. Obviously the more  saturated festival-sphere, the tougher that task becomes.  I think its identity crisis (if you want to call it that) is rooted in the desire to appeal to longtime "Bonnaroovians" with the realization that its target demographics are broadening with the younger generations in play. Hate to say it but attendance numbers are important. They're a large gauge of relevance in the industry and its why mainstream adoption is here to stay.  Attendance and line-ups aside, the most important thing  to note here is the experience hasn't changed. The positivity and embrace of random strangers from every background creates a vibe and its what separates Roo from every. single. festival. It is truly a 700 acre utopia and is equally a catalyst for its long term success. 

See y'all on the farm! 80,000 strong this year.

 

Edited by claya91
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It's my first time this year, I'm definitely super excited. 

I've been to Hangout which definitely has a younger vibe and a hard stop at 11pm. But listening to the Black Keys, Florence, Outkast and The Weeknd close it out on the beach with the ocean breeze blowing in has been a seriously awesome experience. 

Pilgrimage last year was a solid line up but the logistics side was a train wreck, they were not prepared for all the tickets they sold at all, AT ALL. 

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It says "see the explainer at right" for Williamson county. What does that say? I just find it hard to believe that Wilson county is higher than them but I guess it could be driven by Wilson getting Manufacturing jobs, and Williamson county just getting the corporate ones. 

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Three finalists have emerged for the job of leading Metro Nashville's Planning Department, which is the gateway for commercial and residential developers looking to win approval for the kinds of projects that have fueled Nashville's real estate frenzy.

Two of the three candidates are already at the department: Bob Leeman, its interim executive director, and Lucy Kempf, who manages the department's land-development division. The third finalist is Malisa McCreedy, currently an official at the city of Portland, Ore.'s parking department.

More info on each here at NBJ:


https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2018/06/11/finalists-contend-for-job-of-influencing-nashville.html?ana=twt

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