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So Nashville added another resident last night... Turner Wallace Chinetti 9 pounds 6 ounces. 20 inches.  Mom and baby are doing great! He’s ready to argue about scooters, height re

Took this yesterday.  Wanted to make it longer but it was quite windy yesterday. Some random thoughts...  How much room there is between Lafayette and the Interstate

I am humbled that NashvilleNowNext did a feature on my photo work here at Urban Planet Nashville. https://nashvillenownext.com/2021/04/02/the-hollingsworth-reel-vol-1-highlighting-the-work-of-nas

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On 8/13/2021 at 10:16 AM, markhollin said:

The Nashville metro area's population jumped 21% in a decade and seized the lion's share of Tennessee's growth, according to newly released data from the 2020 U.S. Census.

Greater Nashville's growth, an average net gain of almost 95 people every day, pushed the metro area's population to the brink of hitting the 2 million mark.

The data also show that nine of Tennessee's ten fastest-growing counties are in Greater Nashville, including all of the top-7.
 

  • The Nashville metro area's growth ranked as the 19th biggest percent increase of any U.S. metro. (The Austin metro area's population leaped 33% in the decade, growth second only to The Villages, Florida.)
  • Williamson County's population soared 35.2% — the 25th largest jump of any county in the U.S. and the second-biggest in Tennessee, behind Trousdale County's 47.6% increase (which was the eighth-biggest percent increase nationwide).
  • Davidson County's headcount grew the most of Tennessee's 95 counties, rising by 89,203 people to a total of 715,884. That amounts to 14.2% growth over the decade.
  • Rutherford County posted growth of 30% in the decade, drawing within 25,000 residents of leapfrogging Hamilton County (home to Chattanooga) as the state's fourth-most-populous county.
  • Wilson, Montgomery, Maury and Sumner counties followed Rutherford among the counties with the largest percent gains in population.


More at NBJ here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2021/08/13/census-2020-population.html?utm_source=st&utm_medium=en&utm_campaign=me&utm_content=na&ana=e_na_me&j=24733535&senddate=2021-08-13

It doesn't look like Rutherford has passed Hamilton quite yet, but close. I feel like Murfreesboro should get a highrise or two this decade. The county already has a larger population than Fayette county, ky; where Lexington is and it has a couple of decent towers. It's larger than what Knox county and Hamilton were back when they got towers. It's time.

IMG_20210814_132332.jpg

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29 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

I suppose I don't understand the bases for CSAs because if Shelbyville/Bedford is a part of it, why isn't Clarksville/Montgomery? 

It has to do with commuting patterns, primarily...and the problem with Clarksville/Montgomery is that the base is on the wrong side of town...

Clarksville may eventually join the CSA, but I think it will take the area from Joelton to Pleasant View to Sango really blowing up before it happens.

 

As for Shelbyville....I think there are a lot of commuters to Murfreesboro. Just like commuters from Marshall and Lawrence Counties are going to Columbia and sometimes Franklin.

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32 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

I suppose I don't understand the bases for CSAs because if Shelbyville/Bedford is a part of it, why isn't Clarksville/Montgomery? 

Tbh, I never understood either. Shelbyville is about an hour and 10 or minutes out,  compared to Clarksville 45-50 mins. 

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34 minutes ago, MagicPotato said:

Tbh, I never understood either. Shelbyville is about an hour and 10 or minutes out,  compared to Clarksville 45-50 mins. 

Don't forget that the official name of the Nashville MSA is Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro--Franklin.  People don't have to commute all the way in to downtown Nashville to be included in the MSA.  Like UTGrad said, plenty of people from Shelbyville make the short commute to Murfreesboro, enough to put Bedford County in the CSA.  I suspect Bedford will someday become part of the MSA as it continues to become a popular bedroom community of Rutherford County.  I think it's 10% have to make the commute to be part of the CSA, and 25% to be part of the MSA.  I think.

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1 hour ago, UTgrad09 said:

Tennessee Primary Statistical Areas With County Breakdown

CSA = Combined Statistical Area (multiple statistical areas with a common economic or social linkage)
MSA = Metropolitan Statistical Area (areas with an urban core of at least 50,000 that share an economic linkage)
μSA = Micropolitan Statistical Area (areas with an urban core of between 10-50,000 that share an economic linkage)

Area - 2020 Census Count - numerical change - percentage change

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, TN CSA - 2,118,233 - +354,489 - +20.01%
-Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN MSA - 1,989,519 - +343,319 - +20.86%
--Davidson, TN - 715,884 - +89,203 - +14.23%
--Rutherford, TN - 341,486 - +78,882 - +30.04%
--Williamson, TN - 247,726 - +64,544 - +35.23%
--Sumner, TN - 196,281 - +35,636 - +22.18%
--Wilson, TN - 147,737 - +33,744 - +29.60%
--Maury, TN - 100,974 - +20,018 - +24.73%
--Robertson, TN - 72,803 - +6,520 - +9.84%
--Dickson, TN - 54,315 - +4,649 - +9.36%
--Cheatham, TN - 41,072 - +1,967 - +5.03%
--Macon, TN - 25,216 - +2,968 - +13.34%
--Smith, TN - 19,904 - +738 - +3.85%
--Cannon, TN - 14,506 - +705 - +5.11%
--Trousdale, TN - 11,615 - +3,745 - +47.59%
-Shelbyville, TN μSA - 50,237 - +5,179 - +11.49%
--Bedford, TN - 50,237 - +5,179 - +11.49%
-Lawrenceburg, TN μSA - 44,159 - +2,290 - +5.47%
--Lawrence, TN - 44,159 - +2,290 - +5.47%
-Lewisburg, TN μSA - 34,318 - +3,701 - +12.09%
--Marshall, TN - 34,318 - +3,701 - +12.09%

Memphis-Forrest City, TN-MS-AR CSA - 1,360,869 - +16,511 - +1.22%
-Memphis, TN-MS-AR MSA - 1,337,779 - +21,679 - +1.65%
--Shelby, TN - 929,744 - +2,100 - +0.23%
--DeSoto, MS - 185,314 - +24,062 - +14.92%
--Tipton, TN - 60,970 - (-111) - (-0.18%)
--Crittenden, AR - 48,163 - (-2,739) - (-5.38%)
--Fayette, TN - 41,990 - +3,577 - +9.31%
--Marshall, MS - 33,752 - (-3,392) - (-9.13%)
--Tate, MS - 28,064 - (-822) - (-2.85%)
--Tunica, MS - 9,782 - (-996) - (-9.24%)
-Forrest City, AR μSA - 23,090 - (-5,168) - (-18.29%)
--St. Francis, AR - 23,090 - (-5,168) - (-18.29%)

Knoxville-Morristown-Sevierville, TN CSA - 1,156,861 - +79,788 - +7.41%
-Knoxville, TN MSA - 879,773 - +64,859 - +8.00%
--Knox, TN - 478,971 - +46,745 - +10.81%
--Blount, TN - 135,280 - +12,270 - +9.97%
--Anderson, TN - 77,123 - +1,994 - +2.65%
--Loudon, TN - 54,886 - +6,330 - +13.04%
--Roane, TN - 53,404 - (-777) - (-1.43%)
--Campbell, TN - 39,272 - (-1,444) - (-3.55%)
--Morgan, TN - 21,035 - (-952) - (-4.33%)
--Union, TN - 19,802 - +693 - +3.63%
-Morristown, TN MSA - 142,709 - +6,101 - +4.47%
--Hamblen, TN - 64,499 - +1,955 - +3.13%
--Jefferson, TN - 54,683 - +3,276 - +6.37%
--Grainger, TN - 23,527 - +870 - +3.84%
-Sevierville, TN μSA - 98,380 - +8,491 - +9.45%
--Sevier, TN - 98,380 - +8,491 - +9.45%
-Newport, TN μSA - 35,999 - +337 - +0.94%
--Cocke, TN - 35,999 - +337 - +0.94%

Chattanooga-Cleveland-Dalton, TN-GA CSA - 1,000,303 - +48,869 - +5.14%
-Chattanooga, TN-GA MSA - 562,647 - +34,504 - +6.53%
--Hamilton, TN - 366,207 - +29,744 - +8.84%
--Catoosa, GA - 67,872 - +3,930 - +6.15%
--Walker, GA - 67,654 - (-1,102) - (-1.60%)
--Marion, TN - 28,837 - +600 - +2.12%
--Dade, GA - 16,251 - (-382) - (-2.30%)
--Sequatchie, TN - 15,826 - +1,714 - +12.15%
-Dalton, GA MSA - 142,837 - +610 - +0.43%
--Whitfield, GA - 102,864 - +265 - +0.26%
--Murray, GA - 39,973 - +345 - +0.87%
-Cleveland, TN MSA - 126,164 - +10,376 - +8.96%
--Bradley, TN - 108,620 - +9,657 - +9.76%
--Polk, TN - 17,544 - +719 - +4.27%
-Calhoun, GA μSA - 57,544 - +2,358 - +4.27%
--Gordon, GA - 57,544 - +2,358 - +4.27%
-Athens, TN μSA - 53,276 - +1,010 - +1.93%
--McMinn, TN - 53,276 - +1,010 - +1.93%
-Dayton, TN μSA - 32,870 - +1,061 - +3.34%
--Rhea, TN - 32,870 - +1,061 - +3.34%
-Summerville, GA μSA - 24,965 - (-1,050) - (-4.04%)
--Chattooga, GA - 24,965 - (-1,050) - (-4.04%)

Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, TN-VA CSA - 514,899 - +6,639 - +1.31%
-Kingsport-Bristol, TN-VA MSA - 307,614 - (-1,930) - (-0.62%)
--Sullivan, TN - 158,163 - +1,340 - +0.85%
--Hawkins, TN - 56,721 - (-112) - (-0.20%)
--Washington, VA - 53,935 - (-941) - (-1.71%)
--Scott, VA - 21,576 - (-1,601) - (-6.91%)
--Bristol city, VA - 17,219 - (-616) - (-3.45%)
-Johnson City, TN MSA - 207,285 - +8,569 - +4.31%
--Washington, TN - 133,001 - +10,022 - +8.15%
--Carter, TN - 56,356 - (-1,068) - (-1.86%)
--Unicoi, TN - 17,928 - (-385) - (-2.1%)

Clarksville, TN-KY MSA - 320,535 - +46,586 - +17.01%
--Montgomery, TN - 220,069 - +47,738 - +27.70%
--Christian, KY - 72,748 - (-1,207) - (-1.63%)
--Trigg, KY - 14,061 - (-278) - (-1.94%)
--Stewart, TN - 13,657 - +333 - +2.50%

Jackson-Brownsville, TN CSA - 198,368 - (-113) - (-0.05%)
-Jackson, TN MSA - 180,504 - +810 - +0.45%
--Madison, TN - 98,823 - +529 - +0.54%
--Gibson, TN - 50,429 - +746 - +1.50%
--Chester, TN - 17,341 - +210 - +1.23%
--Crockett, TN - 13,911 - (-675) - (-4.63%)
-Brownsville, TN μSA - 17,864 - (-923) - (-4.91%)
--Haywood, TN - 17,864 - (-923) - (-4.91%)

Cookeville, TN μSA - 113,982 - +7,940 - +7.49%
--Putnam, TN - 79,854 - +7,533 - +10.42%
--Overton, TN - 22,511 - +428 - +1.94%
--Jackson, TN - 11,617 - (-21) - (-0.18%)

Tullahoma-Manchester, TN μSA - 107,124 - +6,914 - +6.90%
--Coffee, TN - 57,889 - +5,093 - +9.65%
--Franklin, TN - 42,774 - +1,722 - +4.19%
--Moore, TN - 6,461 - +99 - +1.56%

Greeneville, TN μSA - 70,152 - +1,321 - +1.92%
--Greene, TN - 70,152 - +1,321 - +1.92%

Martin-Union City, TN CSA - 63,689 - (-3,139) - (-4.70%)
-Martin, TN μSA - 32,902 - (-2,119) - (-6.05%)
--Weakley, TN - 32,902 - (-2,119) - (-6.05%)
-Union City, TN μSA - 30,787 - (-1,020) - (-3.21%)
--Obion, TN - 30,787 - (-1,020) - (-3.21%)

Crossville, TN μSA - 61,145 - +5,092 - +9.08%
--Cumberland, TN - 61,145 - +5,092 - +9.08%

McMinnville, TN μSA - 40,953 - +1,114 - +2.80%
--Warren, TN - 40,953 - +1,114 - +2.80%

Dyersburg, TN μSA - 36,801 - (-1,534) - (-4.00%)
--Dyer, TN - 36,801 - (-1,534) - (-4.00%)

Paris, TN μSA - 32,199 - (-131) - (-0.41%)
--Henry, TN - 32,199 - (-131) - (-0.41%)

Cookeville and, especially, Martin really got screwed with this census, similar to other rural college towns across the country.  When covid hit, colleges went all remote, and a bunch of students packed their bags and went home to finish the semester, particularly since many of their jobs were also vaporized by the shutdown.  The Census Bureau did cooperate with colleges to make sure that those who had been living in "group quarters" (dorms) were still counted.  But thousands of students who live in off-campus housing were likely not counted.  I don't think this had as much of an affect on places like Knoxville, Chattanooga, or even Clarksville, where their colleges aren't such a gigantic part of the local populations, but I'm sure it was still a drag on the population increases.

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12 hours ago, titanhog said:

Definitely will eat up more farmland…but I also think suburban cities in metro areas will eventually start building upwards.  I think we’ll see cities that were once considered “suburban” develop their own “urbanity”.  I could see Murfreesboro eventually becoming more urban.  You can only stretch outward for so long before realizing it takes an hour to get from one side of the city to the other and developers start looking for more centralized areas to build…thus starting to go upwards.  Also have to imagine Franklin will start doing this as well (in small steps).  Don’t know if Brentwood will ever be anything but suburban with their land usage.  Cool Springs could have built more “urban”…but chose the suburban model (too bad). 

Wasn't there a couple proposed developments in Cool Springs along Carothers that would push the area in the right direction?  "East Works" plus another one or two. Wouldn't surprise me to see that whole area move vertical over their sea of parking.

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I had suspected the growth was far greater than official estimates. For some reason the powers that be just cannot make decent estimates. IDK if it’s flawed data, incompetence or just a lack of will to recognize the obvious. This is how cities fall behind in keeping infrastructure up. The county grew by nearly 100k and will likely exceed that in this decade. The whole metro will grow by about 400k. And roads are pretty much as they were when I lived there 30 years ago with some exceptions* and still no transit plans?
 

* Road improvements of note are I440, KVB, Division, and White Bridge Rd. and some suburban interstates. Far too little for the amount of growth on the way!  OTOH Antioch is a cluster, downtown expressways and Ellington, and do not get me started on the lack of connected side streets! 

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1 hour ago, MagicPotato said:

51380661213_ccd1bc23d8_o.png
Looks like Atlanta's growth is slowing down a bit? I think the insurgence of Nashville this past decade might be taking a piece of the growth percentage. 

Given current environment and critical mass that Nashville's technology sector has now gained (in addition to entertainment and healthcare), it's not a stretch to believe that Nashville 2050 doubles our 2020 population (and looks more like Atlanta 2010)... but it's hard to see the state or any of the region's local government preparing for that.  And of course, outside of TDOT's highway management, the State government won't care because this doesn't score political points. Metro can't see past 5 years ahead, and the elected leaders all have PTSD from the 2018 referendum. Sumner and Williamson Counties have 20-year land use planning documents that look downright quaint compared to the incredible growth that's already happening in their backyards.

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Given how great the political divide has unfortunately become , transit and /or infrastructure help from the state might never happen . Let’s face it Nashville is for the most part a island of blue in a sea of red. The rural folks in Pickett or Cannon Counties..etc don’t care what happens in Nashville ( or Memphis,Or Knoxville) or what is needed here. So if it’s state funds or cooperation that’s needed and it needs a vote ... probably not going to happen. Now , I’m not trying to stir up some throw down back and forth politics here. Just trying to see things in reality, I’m not blue or red I’m a American who values everyone and wants so much to get pass all this of late and look to a better tomorrow... together. 

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With you 100% , totally agree. If not for Nashville the state as a whole would not be as it is today. But try and tell that to someone out East in Greenville or Morristown or West in Jackson or Dyersburg. I hear all the time at truck stops and establishments across the state. 

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