Jump to content

Nashville Bits and Pieces


smeagolsfree

Recommended Posts


National Geographic put Nashville, as the only US destination, in their Top 5 Destinations in the World to visit this year.  Hat Tip NBJ  https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/05/25/national-geographic-names-nashville.html

https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/travel/2022/05/where-to-travel-in-june-five-of-the-best-destinations

Frankly, I don't see anything new in the Nat Geo piece, but Nashville continues on a roll.

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, MLBrumby said:

National Geographic put Nashville, as the only US destination, in their Top 5 Destinations in the World to visit this year.  Hat Tip NBJ  https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/05/25/national-geographic-names-nashville.html

https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/travel/2022/05/where-to-travel-in-june-five-of-the-best-destinations

Frankly, I don't see anything new in the Nat Geo piece, but Nashville continues on a roll.

 

I believe this was posted a couple days ago. The article is actually saying we are number 1 place to travel in the month of June. A little deceiving in my mind, but I have been seeing it shared a crap ton lately, and thought while it is great for us to be ranked that high it is only a ranking for a single month.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

External study calls for standalone homeless services office, downsize in Homeless Planning Council, and more.

- A $500K external review critiques Nashville's historic approach to housing people experiencing homelessness.

- Reviewers recommended creating an Office of Homeless Services with a mayor-appointed director.

- The review also calls for the Homeless Planning Council to downsize and streamline its processes.

- More than 600 permanent supportive housing beds are needed to address chronically homeless adults.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/davidson/2022/05/26/new-study-critiques-how-nashville-addresses-homelessness/9925729002/

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Bos2Nash said:

I believe this was posted a couple days ago. The article is actually saying we are number 1 place to travel in the month of June. A little deceiving in my mind, but I have been seeing it shared a crap ton lately, and thought while it is great for us to be ranked that high it is only a ranking for a single month.

And the first paragraph — 1/4 of the piece — is dedicated to a music festival 60+ miles outside of the city. Hardly "the outskirts."

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites


5 hours ago, KJHburg said:

I saw this online and it was from Move to Kingsport but it gives a good comparison on TN home prices   I knew Brentwood was expensive but not with median price that high! 

No photo description available.

Pretty much all of the Nashville Metro is $300k or higher…with Franklin and Brentwood getting up close to $1 Million.  Insane!  Wonder what Nashville’s is?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, KJHburg said:

I saw this online and it was from Move to Kingsport but it gives a good comparison on TN home prices   I knew Brentwood was expensive but not with median price that high! 

No photo description available.

Poor Kingsport seems to be grasping at straws.  Note that Kingsport's property taxes are almost identical to Mt Juliet's even though Kingsport's median listing price is less than half of MJ's.  The Kingsport region continues to hemorrhage jobs, so no wonder their housing values are so low and their property tax rate is so high.  Maybe they're just trying to attract retirees?

Until last month, Tennessee's lowest unemployment was in August 2019.  I posted earlier how Tennessee's metro areas have recovered since August 2019 with the glaring exception of Kingsport-Bristol and, to a lesser extent, Jackson and Memphis:

metro area...March 2022 employment...change from Aug 2019
Nashville...1,107,406...54,095
Memphis...622,169...-953
Knoxville...435,154...12,562
Chattanooga...270,223...3,833
Kingsport-Bristol...132,035...-4,242
Clarksville...116,931...3,370
Johnson City...91,645...2,729
Jackson...63,163...-890
Cleveland...56,434...543
Morristown...52,103...1,601

And in the last month, Kingsport has continued to shed jobs at an alarming rate.  Here's how Tennessee's metro areas have done in the last month for employment.

Nashville...+8,491

Memphis...+1,335

Knoxville...+1,530

Chattanooga...+252

Kingsport-Bristol...-778

Clarksville...-372

Johnson City...+89

Jackson...+83

Cleveland...-24

Morristown...+298

 

 

 

Yep, my hometown and I have vowed never to go back. The only way the city has grown is through annexation. The schools are good, but there are few jobs. The Bigboys that were there have either shut down or downsizing   due to modernization. The main employer is Eastman Chemical or a support industry of that company. If you want a progressive city, then Johnson City is where you need to go and it's not much better. The other cities highlighted are all in the area and are all rather depressed IMO.,  

This is the city where the mall killed the downtown and there was no white flight as the poster had blamed. The downtown just died, and this happened to medium sized cities across the country along with Johnson City & Bristol when they built their malls as well.

I think new home construction in the area is very weak although I have not checked that, but I did check homes for sale and saw more land for sale than new homes.

There is nothing to do here except outdoor activities. Few concerts, plays make their way here. Johnson City is the destination since it is the college town and most of the big acts leapfrog the area, so you have to go to Knoxville to see what acts come there. Tri Cities airport has not changed in 50 years. I think there are fewer flights now than when I lived there. My goal was to LEAVE AND NEVER COME BACK as Smeagol would say.

I have no friends there and no family I claim there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Majority of new rules set for Nashville's party vehicles. "Time to regulate the party," according to Mayor Cooper.

The commission made several amendments to the remaining rules before adopting them. The changes are as follows: 

  • Under insurance requirements: increased the liability insurance requirement for vehicles with less than 16 passengers from $1.5 million to $2 million. 
  • Under insurance requirements: increased the uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance coverage for bodily injury, accidents and property damage each to $1 million.
  • Under insurance requirements: increased all insurance requirements for tractors or trucks pulling trailers/wagons to $2 million. 
  • Under vehicle operations: added a provision that if there is a crash, MNPD will handle drug screens for the driver when there is suspected activity, otherwise a driver will be required to take a drug test within three hours of an authorized lab opening for business.
  • Under vehicles: removed a rule banning the display of offensive or inappropriate words, phrases, symbols, objects or images. 
  • Under sound: removed a rule requiring sound monitoring devices capable of documenting sound level above approved levels.
  • Under violations: rewrote a rule to exclude 21 year olds from the chaperone requirement.

    More at The Tennessean here:

    https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/2022/05/26/metro-transportation-licensing-commission-nashville-tn-sets-rules-party-vehicles/9951656002/
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, jmtunafish said:

Poor Kingsport seems to be grasping at straws.  Note that Kingsport's property taxes are almost identical to Mt Juliet's even though Kingsport's median listing price is less than half of MJ's.  The Kingsport region continues to hemorrhage jobs, so no wonder their housing values are so low and their property tax rate is so high.  Maybe they're just trying to attract retirees?

Until last month, Tennessee's lowest unemployment was in August 2019.  I posted earlier how Tennessee's metro areas have recovered since August 2019 with the glaring exception of Kingsport-Bristol and, to a lesser extent, Jackson and Memphis:

metro area...March 2022 employment...change from Aug 2019
Nashville...1,107,406...54,095
Memphis...622,169...-953
Knoxville...435,154...12,562
Chattanooga...270,223...3,833
Kingsport-Bristol...132,035...-4,242
Clarksville...116,931...3,370
Johnson City...91,645...2,729
Jackson...63,163...-890
Cleveland...56,434...543
Morristown...52,103...1,601

And in the last month, Kingsport has continued to shed jobs at an alarming rate.  Here's how Tennessee's metro areas have done in the last month for employment.

Nashville...+8,491

Memphis...+1,335

Knoxville...+1,530

Chattanooga...+252

Kingsport-Bristol...-778

Clarksville...-372

Johnson City...+89

Jackson...+83

Cleveland...-24

Morristown...+298

 

 

 

Yep, my hometown and I have vowed never to go back. The only way the city has grown is through annexation. The schools are good, but there are few jobs. The Bigboys that were there have either shut down or downsizing   due to modernization. The main employer is Eastman Chemical or a support industry of that company. If you want a progressive city, then Johnson City is where you need to go and it's not much better. The other cities highlighted are all in the area and are all rather depressed IMO.,  

This is the city where the mall killed the downtown and there was no white flight as the poster had blamed. The downtown just died, and this happened to medium sized cities across the country along with Johnson City & Bristol when they built their malls as well.

I think new home construction in the area is very weak although I have not checked that, but I did check homes for sale and saw more land for sale than new homes.

There is nothing to do here except outdoor activities. Few concerts, plays make their way here. Johnson City is the destination since it is the college town and most of the big acts leapfrog the area, so you have to go to Knoxville to see what acts come there. Tri Cities airport has not changed in 50 years. I think there are fewer flights now than when I lived there. My goal was to LEAVE AND NEVER COME BACK as Smeagol would say.

I have no friends there and no family I claim there.

Hmmm I have no idea what happened, but I'm not the one who wrote everything starting with "Yep, my hometown..."  Kingsport is not my hometown although I think NE TN is absolutely gorgeous, and it was probably a great place to grow up back in the day.

How was someone able to manipulate my post and add those 5 paragraphs?

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, jmtunafish said:

Hmmm I have no idea what happened, but I'm not the one who wrote everything starting with "Yep, my hometown..."  Kingsport is not my hometown although I think NE TN is absolutely gorgeous, and it was probably a great place to grow up back in the day.

How was someone able to manipulate my post and add those 5 paragraphs?

Just adding to Poor Kingsport.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


The whole forums have been wonky lately. Clinking on a link from an email just dumps me into a random point in the thread never to the actual comment that was in the email. I've done the same edit/replying to random comments. 

It's weird. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seen the same for weeks now. Cannot even pull up the topics page for the Nashville forum. 
 

and when clicking ‘next unread topic’, it takes you to some point on the page at the top. Never to the next unread comment. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems the Journal has a piece on Nashville's growth at least once a quarter now.  From today...  Housing, Child Care, Utilities—Nashville Faces Exceptional Inflation Hit From All Sides  https://www.wsj.com/articles/inflation-nashville-housing-prices-utilities-11654092482?mod=hp_lead_pos5

NASHVILLE—Few Americans are getting squeezed by inflation in more different ways than the residents of Tennessee’s capital.

Housing prices in Nashville have more than doubled over the past 10 years, partly because of a population boom that has brought nearly 400,000 new residents to the metropolitan area. That has pushed some locals farther away from the city center, adding hours to their weekly commutes. Meager public-transit options mean soaring fuel prices are hitting them especially hard.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, markhollin said:

Mayor John Cooper signed a new law aimed at incentivizing developers who are building apartments in Nashville to include affordable units as part of each development. The program would allow qualifying developments to access a tax abatement in exchange for long term affordability for 20-40% of the units. The program provides a tiered structure for the abatement; the more affordable the rent, the higher the abatement. This tool is focused on housing security for Nashvillians making 50-70% of the Area Median Income. This payment in lieu of taxes, also known as the Mixed Income PILOT, was approved by the Metro Council 24-4 on May 5th. 

More at NashvilleNowNext here:

https://nashvillenownext.com/2022/06/01/mayor-cooper-enacts-new-initiative-to-spur-more-affordable-housing-units/

I believe this is the PILOT that CM Benedict mentioned on the 1500 Porter webex last week (I did a follow up on the East Nashville thread) as a way to bring affordable housing into that development.

Hopefully the State doesn't try to squash this as incentive (ie the Bonus Height program) to developers for affordable housing. I think this is a very smart way to try and get developers to build affordable and maintain affordable units. It keeps things as a mixed-income model while also giving a benefit to private developers. I also puts some of the blame of affordable housing back on the developers instead of just being in Metro's court. This way we also have two mechanisms from a city government standpoint for affordable housing; the Barnes Fund and this tax incentive.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found this snippet of information from a Facebook post of the 1971 Opryland employee manual (not mine). I worked there the first four years it was open in the Food and Beverage Division. I did the catering for tv tapings and shows for a while and saw a lot of celebrities in various states of sobriety and dress. I have a lot of stories to tell. But I think we all heard about the plans to take down the Ryman Auditorium years ago and here is another description of the plans,

1402924096_RymanTeardown.thumb.jpg.2a6a587cb3b5cb54d081e051ed808054.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, MidTenn1 said:

I found this snippet of information from a Facebook post of the 1971 Opryland employee manual (not mine). I worked there the first four years it was open in the Food and Beverage Division. I did the catering for tv tapings and shows for a while and saw a lot of celebrities in various states of sobriety and dress. I have a lot of stories to tell. But I think we all heard about the plans to take down the Ryman Auditorium years ago and here is another description of the plans,

1402924096_RymanTeardown.thumb.jpg.2a6a587cb3b5cb54d081e051ed808054.jpg

It is unbelievable that demolishing the Ryman was ever an option.  As stupid an idea it was to replace Opryland with a mall, it would've been absolutely unconscionable to tear down the Ryman. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.