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Nashville Bits and Pieces


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1 minute ago, MLBrumby said:

They come up with more ways to slice the loaf in that industry.  I do know that Austin is killing it. Atlanta and Austin are at a point where they really shouldn't be considered in the same category with the others. 

True.  But with companies looking at Nashville that have considered maybe Atlanta or Charlotte or Austin it does make sense to look at them.  I hope this shows how expensive Austin is for a company compared to the others including Nashville which are very similar in price.  With the influx of companies coming to Austin from California may have something to do with it but it shows other cities might be much less expensive choices.  

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Wasn't sure where best to put this so please move it if there's a more appropriate home.  Just having some fun and sharing it!

For context, didn't include projects already underway and under 11 stories.  (Just realized I omitted the Ritz project; added to my working document.  Let me know if you notice something I missed please.)

247303410_NashvilleProjects.xlsx

Edited by nashville born
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On 10/5/2022 at 7:17 PM, KJHburg said:

How Nashville market compares to peer cities in the south and Austin.   Nashville is the 2nd most urban in looking at what percentage of total market is downtown  and in your case midtown. 

 

MARKET NAME         1. SIZE OF TOTAL OFFICE MARKET        2. TOTAL VACANCY INCLUDES SUBLEASE                    3. YEAR TO DATE ABSORP-TION %         4. AVG. YEARLY PER SQ FT RATE         

                                              1.                        2.                            3.                  4.                                                                           HIGHEST PRICED SUBMARKET                CENTRAL BUS. DIST VS SUBURBS 
                                                                    
CHARLOTTE        65.209 M            17.60%                1.00%        $34.45                                                               SOUTHEND AT $42.43 SQ FT                45/55
ATLANTA        176.3 M            21.40%                0.40%                 $32.63                                                                          MIDTOWN AT $43.60 SQ FT                37/63
AUSTIN        70.6 M            17.90%                -0.40%                   $54.78                                                                                DOWNTOWN AT $65.87                20/80
NASHVILLE        47.3 M            19.10%                -0.10%            $35.87                                                                       DOWNTOWN AT $43.11                39/61
RALEIGH DURHAM        58.0 M     13.20%                0.20%        $31.45                                                      DOWNTOWN RALEIGH AT $37.98                16/84
                                                                    
Year to date Charlotte is the best performing market in terms of absorption of office space as percentage of the market size.                                                                       
Charlotte is the most urban market in terms of its Uptown, Midtown, Southend all being part of the urban market.                                                                     
Then Nashville is 2nd most urban centric with Atlanta being the third.  (Atlanta urban market includes downtown, Midtown and Buckhead)                                                                    
Austin is by far the most expensive office market.  Raleigh Durham is the cheapest office market but does reflect that it has the most suburban office space as part of the total market.                                                                    
Highest vacancy is in the Atlanta market and all figures include sublease space.  Raleigh Durham has the lowest vacancy rate.            

Atlanta market is by far the largest in size at 176,300,000 sq ft with Austin 2nd largest and Charlotte 3rd but pretty close in market size of total square footage of office space.         

Southeast | Locations | JLL    you can download your own report here 

Nashville has built 16 office buildings at least 10 stories since 2016. Thanks.

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@rookzie, utilizing the rail r-o-w seems like such a natural for LRT, but for some reason the powers running Metro don't want to even mention it as a first step to transit. Do you think it's even remotely likely to happen, notwithstanding the tough negotiations that would have to happen between metro and CSX.  Am I wrong to see their removing tracks as an open door for Metro to approach them for that purpose?  Where would the possible routes go from there north/south?  Those tracks have not been removed and are unlikely to be. 

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2 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

@rookzie, utilizing the rail r-o-w seems like such a natural for LRT, but for some reason the powers running Metro don't want to even mention it as a first step to transit. Do you think it's even remotely likely to happen, notwithstanding the tough negotiations that would have to happen between metro and CSX.  Am I wrong to see their removing tracks as an open door for Metro to approach them for that purpose?  Where would the possible routes go from there north/south?  Those tracks have not been removed and are unlikely to be. 

No, I don't foresee any of that happening, because in part it requires a collaborative exchange and resolution proposals among members of the administration.  As yet, none of that even shows a sign of having been a concept, much less a subject of forum discussion.  Almost every trace of that prospect petered out in late spring 2018, with no momentum regained since then.   Then the pandemic came, and for all practical purposes that sealed the coffin.

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On 10/20/2022 at 5:57 PM, MLBrumby said:

@rookzie, utilizing the rail r-o-w seems like such a natural for LRT, but for some reason the powers running Metro don't want to even mention it as a first step to transit. Do you think it's even remotely likely to happen, notwithstanding the tough negotiations that would have to happen between metro and CSX.  Am I wrong to see their removing tracks as an open door for Metro to approach them for that purpose?  Where would the possible routes go from there north/south?  Those tracks have not been removed and are unlikely to be. 

I think using the existing track R.O.W. to  me is absolutely a non starter for light rail.  Crossing Bicentennial Mall and crossing the river to acesss East Nashville are 6 ways to impossible IMO.  The swing bridge over the Cumberland could  NOT be replaced as the gradient  of the tracks cannont be increased to install a non-swing bridge over the river with sufficient vertical clearences.  CSX might allow a light rail line in the newly vacant yard but they would never share the swing bridge which is already a bottleneck.  Likewise the span over 8th Avenue S. is not likely to be sharable.  There is just too much immovable infrastucture to make replacement feasable.   I think folks on this forum fixated on this pie-in-the sky concept  need to move on to other solutions that might actually work.

 

Edited by Baronakim
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IMHO the thoughts of using anything that involves working with CSX and existing infrastructure, needs to be completely forgotten. Think a bit outside the box , and really consider a monorail system. It can be elevated where necessary, more efficient, quiet, all electric, and build trash to energy plant to power it , eliminating more polluting landfills. Their pylon structures can be put in medians in existing R.O.W  on both State and City owned Roads / Land, and as done at Disney they could go into buildings for stations , because there’s no emissions . Clean and effective.

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1 hour ago, rookzie said:

 

A river crossing doesn't even have to utilize or run alongside the existing 1910-built L&N (CSX) swing bridge.  To date, several river additional river crossings have been proposed during the last 5 years for surface roadway use ─ between the East Bank at S. 5th and Crutcher streets, and Willow Street on the opposite bank; and three separate crossings between the West Bank north of I-65 (formerly I-265) and the existing Clarksville Hywy (US-41A) to Bordeaux.  An additional river crossing would be needed for any common point of any combination of FRA-compliant or FRA-waiver commuter rail with light rail, whether the light rail mode utilizes DMUs or standard LRT EMUs.   There exist several options for additional river crossings and new R-o-W, even if some routing might end up rather circuitous in path to a central interchange location.   One or more of these proposed river crossings could be built to also accommodate traffic and light-rail, or one or more parallel bridges could be constructed to support either light-rail or FRA-compliant or FRA-waiver commuter rail.  The trick is to plan by concerted initiatives coordinated among local and regional decision-makers ─ something that perpetually seems to have run amiss.

That said, it might become concluded that more than one hub be constructed for interchanging between routes, but most likely at least some of those proposed routes ─ such as the West and South and Southeast proposed corridor routes ─ would have a significant advantage in utilizing the gulch in some form or fashion for a shared interchange.  All those can terminate on the west of the West Bank ─ most likely west of the CBD-downtown, that is.  There absolutely needs to be a planned Southeast that connects with Rutherford Cnty, as that has been deemed the most potentially densely utilized corridor of all.  These potentially all could utilize the CSX with R-o-W expansions along the entirety of the corridors, and these would be much less disruptive to the existing core structure than constructing entirely new R-o-W.  Also, it likely would be the least expensive alternative to tunneling along these corridors (and utilizing light-rail), as grade-separation would be necessary to provide unimpeded travel along these corridors.  Even with current tunnel boring machines and technology, the cost of constructing grade-separated infrastructure via tunneling along extended segments radiating from downtown likely would significantly exceed that of greasing the palms of CSX.  There is no freaking way that local districts that include the West End, Belle Meade, Berry Hill, Oak Hill, and Brentwood are going to allow light rail along the surface arterial ─ far too many NIMBYs ─ and they would have to vote as NIMBYs did in some other regions to finance subterranean infrastructure, whether for light-rail or heavy-rail transit (metro-style subway).

If not utilizing the Gulch, then an entirely new set-up, utilizing only a light-rail mode, would require some implementation of tunneling downtown and most likely beyond.   There’s no way the city can construct a dedicated FRA “railroad-quality” commuter-rail downtown presence that does not utilize the gulch, while providing at least some connectivity among different corridors, unless it goes primarily to tunneling for light rail only.  

Just saying, the Gulch still remains a viable option for rail transit use, whether or not a terminal is built in the Gulch or away from it, as the Gulch would provide the only direct land-use connection for those particular corridors which could benefit from its use.

   

Rookzie, I do appreciate your well thought out analysis.  However, I do not feel the crux of the problem involves the Gulch as the central component.  LTR on the surface is very unfeasible for Nashville on the whole.  I think that any system will have to be elevated to a large extent.  Tunneling is just too expensive overall... look at Boston's 'Big Dig".   There is no really viable route thorugh neighborhoods  for a  new rail route as it must be  relatively linear.  I recall that the location of 440 was made largely because of the existance of old secondary abandoned rail lines.  Rail systems also require fairly slight gradants a s well.  More than three decades ago, I was involved in proposals  for a large airport facility beyond city sized facilities.  The proposal was to construct a 'worldport' hub for the eastern US and connecting Chicago, Middle Tennessee, Atlanta and Miami  as an initial routing with an elevated maglev system connecting the airports.   The maglev  system was to be  completely elevated  above all existing surface transportation connecting at the airports with prefabricated longspan structure between pylons..  Speed was similar to the Japanesee bullet trains  I still think maglev to cental hubs in outlying suburban locations connecting to maybe 2 hubs in the core.   Multiple stops along the way just seems too excessively slow.  As you have stated, routing down existing arterials or with CSX is a nasty can of worms.  I don't think a system with stops like a bus route will serve  our city efficiently. rather outlying hubs directly connecting with the core without stops between is IMO the way to go.  Such a system could be  routed independantly of existing infrastructure routes.  I haven't relooked at the concepts in decades but surely the technolgy is much more developed than what we proposed back in the 1980s.   

Edited by Baronakim
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7 hours ago, MagicPotato said:

Music Genre Preference in Each U.S. State

Interesting that TN isn't country. Even more surprising is that country is popular in PA, VA, WI, and OH.

 

r/nashville - Music Genre Preference in Each U.S. State

 

 

 

Yup.  There are 18 radio stations in Cookeville, but only three are country.  My sister just moved to Cookeville from Wisconsin and was surprised that she heard more country music in Wisconsin than she does down here, either live or on the radio.

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9 hours ago, MagicPotato said:

Music Genre Preference in Each U.S. State

Interesting that TN isn't country. Even more surprising is that country is popular in PA, VA, WI, and OH.

 

r/nashville - Music Genre Preference in Each U.S. State

 

 

 

Ah, those country music hotbeds of Delaware and New Hampshire!

This is fascinating, thank you for posting!

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