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ah59396

Proposed 9% property tax hike

19 posts in this topic

Thought this was a discussion worth continuing, however didn't feel it was best suited for the Streetcar thread. If this needs to be moved to the Coffeehouse, I can dig it.

snapback.pngah59396, on 22 March 2012 - 06:01 PM, said:

I'm in favor of the increase, but frankly I think the list of projects are a kick in the face to the people of southeast Charlotte.

If South Corridor projects benefitted South Charlotte, I would think Independence Corridor projects will benefit South Charlotte, too. That corridor is called "Southeast," by the way.

South Charlotte will be stronger with an outgrowth of tax base beyond its edges. That happened along South Boulevard. Now, it can hopefully happen towards Monroe Road and Independence Boulevard. Otherwise, it's time to give up and wall ourselves off from the rest of the City.

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I'm just questioning if these neighborhood improvements will truly be a catalyst for property tax base growth. I looked at the PDF just like everyone else did and there were no surprises that virtually all of the tax revenue for the city comes from the swath of land south of uptown down into Ballantyne. Now they propose a tax hike to those people to "beautify" every other part of Charlotte except the area where they live. Taxes are already a big reason a lot of folks are moving out into the burbs (monroe, fort mill, mooresville, concord, ect.) and places like Ballantyne continue to threaten leaving Charlotte and forming their own municipality.

Again, I feel the projects have merit and deserve to be truly looked at, but I find this proposal to be poorly timed following the Meck increase and the current aura of all things tax related. And as I said, this proposal completely ignores the providing tax base.

This proposal only continues the perception that Charlotte is "taxing the middle class right out of the city" as many people believe. I mean seriously, that food stamp map was staggering.

Edited by ah59396

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A lot of cities these days are just the really rich, and the really poor, with the middle class living in the surrounding areas. Its the sad truth in today's society.

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Personally, my tax assessment doubled in 2011 for my Plaza-Midwood home. A lot of the latest proposed projects in the City Manager's package are not far from my neighborhood, but none are actually within it. Still, I find that to be ok. I'd rather see the tax base grow beyond Midwood towards Belmont (Cross-Charlotte Trail) and towards and past Eastway (Central-Eastland-Albemarle NIP). Besides, past bonds are already paying for the new Plaza-Commonwealth project (2006 bond) currently under construction.

In South Charlotte, Rea Road will be under construction, as well as Ballantyne Commons/Elm and Providence/McKee, all thanks to past bonds. It's not like South Charlotte doesn't have any recent capital projects. And thanks to a TIF in Ballantyne (which diverts tax dollars from general revenue), South Charlotte will also see a Johnston Road flyover to I-485, plus the Community House Road bridge over I-485. And within this latest 2012-2020 bond package proposal, South Charlotte will also have a stretch of greenway (Little Sugar Creek from Brandywine to Huntington Farms), plus a major roadway project with Park South Drive extension in South Park.

As the Mayor has said, it would be unwise to spread City resources thin across the entire city like peanut butter. Just as the City now enjoys the development-payoff of concentrated projects in the South Corridor (which was not that many years ago), the City should now concentrate on the next set of major economic development zones and corridors. Per the City Manager's proposal, these next focus areas potentially include the "Innovation Corridor" north of Uptown, the BLE corridor to UNCC, the Airport zone near the new intermodal facility and Garden Parkway, as well as the streetcar corridor to JCSU.

Edited by southslider

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well said. i live off central and will benefit from the 2006 pedscape bonds. based on the time it takes to move these projects forward, now is the time to set them in motion. we are all broke, but charlotte cannot sit stagnant. my heart was broken when i looked at test scores for the central areas of town in that ppt. there are far too many urban hopefuls in those areas to let things fall by the wayside. i am all for paying a premium to see this city have the means to do what needs to be done to help these areas. (ps...no caps is the benfit of an android tablet, im usually better about grammar)

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I'm a renter so I am unable to say yay or nay for this, but I am curious about two things. What does the board think is the chance that this will or won't pass, and what about an alternative to capture the renter market (which is becoming a larger and larger segment in Charlotte)? Not sure how you do that to be honest - but just throwing the idea out there,

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The rental market is being captured with the increased property taxes of newly developed land in expensive areas close to uptown, south park and ballantyne. i think that is about as far as it can go. im not an expert, hopefully someone can speak more to that.

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Yeah I feel like the rental market is already where it needs to be. Sometimes its just best to leave well enough alone.

I think this will pass. But I'm still skeptical it will change the perception of these neighborhoods to potential home buyers. I'm not against investing money in these places per say, I'm just skeptical it'll work.

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Since the vote will be on the bonds in 2012 (then again in 2014, 2016 and 2020), any renters registered to vote will have as much say as property owners. The tax levy is actually decided by Council. Of course, voters then decide whether to re-elect their Council.

Historically, City bonds have been grouped as Transportation, Neighborhood Improvement, and Affordable Housing. I do wonder how this new package will be presented to voters in 2012.

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Didn't really want to start a new thread for Union County, so I just figured I'd bump this one.

 

UC just approved a 15.4% tax hike. If the school board ruling holds up in appeals court, they're facing another 42% tax increase next year.  :shok:

 

For that, they get virtually no services. 

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Didn't really want to start a new thread for Union County, so I just figured I'd bump this one.

 

UC just approved a 15.4% tax hike. If the school board ruling holds up in appeals court, they're facing another 42% tax increase next year.  :shok:

 

For that, they get virtually no services. 

People move to the suburbs for lower taxes, then taxes eventually have to go up to provide the services everyone wants.

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42%? That's crazy. I wonder how that will make their taxes compare to Charlotte's if that hike kicks in.

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For 2013-14:

Union: .6600

Monroe: .6600 + .5550 = 1.215

Mecklenburg: .8157

Charlotte: .8157 + .4687 = 1.2844

 

So it appears the new Union tax rate for 14-15 will be .7614; Mecklenburg has no planned prop tax hike (just sales tax). 

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As Gomer Pyle would say, "Surprise, Surprise, Surprise!"

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42%? That's crazy. I wonder how that will make their taxes compare to Charlotte's if that hike kicks in.

I believe the 42% increase would be temporary until the ruling is paid off, but you know how temporary tax increases can be...

 

Anyway, here is the information about the tax increase from the county:

 

http://www.co.union.nc.us/Portals/0/Finance/BudgetPresentationChamber06202014.pdf

 

What about the verdict?
For FY 2015 Budget Development it was 
not Considered.
County cannot fund the remaining $76.2 
million of the verdict without a tax 
increase.
 
– Cannot cut enough to fund the verdict.
– Utility Funds should not be used for this 
purpose.
-Tax impact of remaining verdict = 32 cents

 

 

I could be reading this incorrectly, someone please let me know if that is the case, but I remember when the verdict was first passed down it was mentioned that there may be a 60+  % temporary tax increase to pay for the verdict.

 

The article linked also projects UC's county' tax rate to be .81 by 2020 anyway. I'd be pretty pissed if I was paying near Meck Co. rates but not getting trash pick up, no parks, etc.

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No biggie, just move to Anson Co. Winning?

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No biggie, just move to Anson Co. Winning?

 

I've always dreamed of a 2 hour commute!

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I enrolled about 100 families at Weddington High School over three years and no more than five were from NC or SC. NY and NJ were strongly represented. If you drove through some of those new neighborhoods you would be hard pressed to find NC license plates at that time. The parents were pleasantly surprised to see their tax bills, compared to their previous municipalities. It was common of them to mention it. Of course these families were new to the aspect of private and personal water and septic systems that must be maintained, repaired and eventually replaced at their own expense. Several happened to mention to me that the hardness of the water from their well had damaged an appliance or two which required more expense and maintenance. They lived in a non-professional fire district with enhanced risk which was reflected in higher insurance cost. They contracted for rubbish collection. If they were unfortunate to require police service he (she) would be dispatched from Monroe, and after the wait would be perhaps less than one might expect. Their high school children had no library to speak of and the family had to pay a fee to use the fine library at Rea and Colony in Mecklenburg. Storm sewers were uncommon in those developments. Same for sidewalks and curbs and other standard items of civic engineering. They deplored the condition of the Union County Department of Social Services (rightly). They were willing to make the choice for these hidden and deferred costs for the sake of a reduced tax bill once a year.

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^When my wife and I were exploring options outside Mecklenburg in surrounding counties (hey, we have to at least look right?), I remember sitting in the builder's office of a couple different communities. I didn't hear one single southern accent for people that came in looking at floor plans in the development. Not one. Also, you can ride through a community such as Baxter Village in Fort Mill and see mostly Patriots, Giants and Steelers (though, the argument can be made for many South Carolinians who've never set foot in Pittsburgh) flags outside their homes. 

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I enrolled about 100 families at Weddington High School over three years and no more than five were from NC or SC. NY and NJ were strongly represented. If you drove through some of those new neighborhoods you would be hard pressed to find NC license plates at that time. The parents were pleasantly surprised to see their tax bills, compared to their previous municipalities. It was common of them to mention it. Of course these families were new to the aspect of private and personal water and septic systems that must be maintained, repaired and eventually replaced at their own expense. Several happened to mention to me that the hardness of the water from their well had damaged an appliance or two which required more expense and maintenance. They lived in a non-professional fire district with enhanced risk which was reflected in higher insurance cost. They contracted for rubbish collection. If they were unfortunate to require police service he (she) would be dispatched from Monroe, and after the wait would be perhaps less than one might expect. Their high school children had no library to speak of and the family had to pay a fee to use the fine library at Rea and Colony in Mecklenburg. Storm sewers were uncommon in those developments. Same for sidewalks and curbs and other standard items of civic engineering. They deplored the condition of the Union County Department of Social Services (rightly). They were willing to make the choice for these hidden and deferred costs for the sake of a reduced tax bill once a year.

 I felt like I was reading All Quiet on the Western Front.

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