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There's an article on Greenville News site about the trolley service changing, and questions being raised over the neighborhood routes. Does anyone know much about those routes? I think it's unfortunate that they're being forced to question them, but it makes me wonder: did they implement them poorly? Could the routes have been drawn better to reach more people? Or should they have run off of Main Street to make them a more viable/reliable "long" distance transportation option? 

When I lived deep in the West End, I always just opted to walk. However, I would have been more serious about using it, if I could have commuted on it. 

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When I lived at Main at Stone I never used the trolley. I just felt like it was inconvenient. It was much easier and quicker driving. The schedule of when and where the trolley runs is also confusing. 

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14 hours ago, GvilleSC said:

There's an article on Greenville News site about the trolley service changing, and questions being raised over the neighborhood routes. Does anyone know much about those routes? I think it's unfortunate that they're being forced to question them, but it makes me wonder: did they implement them poorly? Could the routes have been drawn better to reach more people? Or should they have run off of Main Street to make them a more viable/reliable "long" distance transportation option? 

For one example - the "Arts district" route was a logical add-on but has seen low ridership.    The "Augusta Rd" route is popular and is almost certain to be kept in some form.

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13 hours ago, gman430 said:

When I lived at Main at Stone I never used the trolley. I just felt like it was inconvenient. It was much easier and quicker driving. The schedule of when and where the trolley runs is also confusing. 

There were some issues with the Trolley Tracker app when 4 routes were created, because the apps were based on the previous premise of a single route path.   It should have improved by now.   Do you find the app confusing now, and what parts are confusing?   Granted, trying to describe what they do in a single map and text is confusing.

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I see people griping about Greenlink’s skimpy level of service.  At least it has expanded in two ways: the trolleys around downtown neighborhoods and (while separate) a line to Clemson.

Why, however, is there no movement towards better intercity transit around the Upstate and to Atlanta and Charlotte, though?

I-85 is horrid. While I am not a fan of intercity buses, why isn’t there at least an expansion of perhaps commuter buses between Charlotte, Greenville and Atlanta?  Or, better yet, more passenger trains?

NC is expanding frequencies and increasing speeds of passenger trains between Charlotte and Raleigh.  A company called Brightline, which runs sleek new trains around Miami, is eyeing Charlotte-Atlanta.  Why isn’t anyone on the ground in Greenville helping push improvements to intercity transit along?  Yes, I know that Trump and his crowd hate trains, but local governments around the US, particularly in fast-growing areas, are improving intercity transit...except in the Upstate.

 

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 Yes, I know that Trump and his crowd hate trains...

Sounds like fake news...who comprises 'his crowd'?  Share a link to verify his hate? :dontknow:

I believe congress is more at fault than Trump individually...

The only instance that I've heard of a dislike for trains is because Calif. poured billions of tax funds (for years) into a new/unfinished rapid train system and wasted lots on the project.  Rapid transit will develop in the upstate region...it takes billions from private and gov't. sectors to pay for it.  I don't think leaders readily know the exact improvements (demands) that must be made at this time since the area is growing so fast..studies will be conducted for a while.   

 

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17 minutes ago, cabelagent said:

 Yes, I know that Trump and his crowd hate trains...

Sounds like fake news...who comprises 'his crowd'?  Share a link to verify his hate? :dontknow:

I believe congress is more at fault than Trump individually...

The only instance that I've heard of a dislike for trains is because Calif. poured billions of tax funds (for years) into a new/unfinished rapid train system and wasted lots on the project.  Rapid transit will develop in the upstate region...it takes billions from private and gov't. sectors to pay for it.  I don't think leaders readily know the exact improvements (demands) that must be made at this time since the area is growing so fast..studies will be conducted for a while.   

 

Look at Trump’s budget: it basically eliminates Amtrak except for the Northeast Corridor, where the Trump administration won’t fund work for tunnels leading into Manhattan, which is critical.  I was involved in Republican politics for years.  There is a strong “train hater” part of the GOP base.  Congress (even a GOP one) is fine.

There is no movement in the Upstate for better intra- or inter-city transit, studies or not.

Edited by PuppiesandKittens

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4 hours ago, PuppiesandKittens said:

Look at Trump’s budget: it basically eliminates Amtrak except for the Northeast Corridor, where the Trump administration won’t fund work for tunnels leading into Manhattan, which is critical.  I was involved in Republican politics for years.  There is a strong “train hater” part of the GOP base.  Congress (even a GOP one) is fine.

There is no movement in the Upstate for better intra- or inter-city transit, studies or not.

There's been much discussion with this topic on here (read comments last year)...bottom issue is money and who pays for improvements.  The federal/state  government can't afford to pay for everything related to transportation issues (as you appear to desire). I indicated (earlier post) that I'm willing to pay an additional tax for improved transportation in the region....if funds actually go to this effort. I'm bummed that we're seeing very little of the gas tax increase(s) with road improvements in this area. There's so many roads in the county that need improvements/paving...it will take years.  Somebody in Columbia is pocketing that money and we're powerless to change it.   BTW...I'm not worried about critical funding for tunnels leading into Manhattan. :whistling:     

Edited by cabelagent

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32 minutes ago, cabelagent said:

There's been much discussion with this topic on here (read comments last year)...bottom issue is money and who pays for improvements.  The federal/state  government can't afford to pay for everything related to transportation issues (as you appear to desire). I indicated (earlier post) that I'm willing to pay an additional tax for improved transportation in the region....if funds actually go to this effort. I'm bummed that we're seeing very little of the gas tax increase(s) with road improvements in this area. There's so many roads in the county that need improvements/paving...it will take years.  Somebody in Columbia is pocketing that money and we're powerless to change it.   BTW...I'm not worried about critical funding for tunnels leading into Manhattan. :whistling:     

I wasn’t going to comment until I read your last sentence. Irrespective of your political views, I find it hilarious that people always want funding for their towns or districts, but don’t care or “worry” about the infrastructure of others. Critical infrastructure in Manhattan is important to the US as it’s our largest city and economic powerhouse. If I’m not mistaken, NY is a net producer (taxes) for the US, while SC isn’t and therefore investing in NY compounds more investment in states like SC. 

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1 hour ago, GVLover said:

I wasn’t going to comment until I read your last sentence. Irrespective of your political views, I find it hilarious that people always want funding for their towns or districts, but don’t care or “worry” about the infrastructure of others. Critical infrastructure in Manhattan is important to the US as it’s our largest city and economic powerhouse. If I’m not mistaken, NY is a net producer (taxes) for the US, while SC isn’t and therefore investing in NY compounds more investment in states like SC. 

Do you think NYC residents give a hoot about our infrastructure situations & roads?  We have large SC companies complaining about our poor roads...probably hindering future  investment creating more jobs. I work  & live in SC...not NYC.

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8 hours ago, GVLover said:

I wasn’t going to comment until I read your last sentence. Irrespective of your political views, I find it hilarious that people always want funding for their towns or districts, but don’t care or “worry” about the infrastructure of others. Critical infrastructure in Manhattan is important to the US as it’s our largest city and economic powerhouse. If I’m not mistaken, NY is a net producer (taxes) for the US, while SC isn’t and therefore investing in NY compounds more investment in states like SC. 

What does this have to do with South Carolina? 

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On 3/18/2019 at 12:28 AM, cabelagent said:

Do you think NYC residents give a hoot about our infrastructure situations & roads?  We have large SC companies complaining about our poor roads...probably hindering future  investment creating more jobs. I work  & live in SC...not NYC.

I don’t think people really care about trains and pristine roads. Oh look, another prestigious corporation moving to Nashville!

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I'm glad to see this money going toward transit. Hopefully the new hire for the transit agency will continue to propel the system forward and use the commitment from the city to their advantage. 

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On 3/17/2019 at 4:13 PM, PuppiesandKittens said:

Why, however, is there no movement towards better intercity transit around the Upstate and to Atlanta and Charlotte, though?

I-85 is horrid. While I am not a fan of intercity buses, why isn’t there at least an expansion of perhaps commuter buses between Charlotte, Greenville and Atlanta?  Or, better yet, more passenger trains?

NC is expanding frequencies and increasing speeds of passenger trains between Charlotte and Raleigh.  A company called Brightline, which runs sleek new trains around Miami, is eyeing Charlotte-Atlanta.  Why isn’t anyone on the ground in Greenville helping push improvements to intercity transit along?  [...] local governments around the US, particularly in fast-growing areas, are improving intercity transit...except in the Upstate.

 

While this reply is months late, the topic is obviously relevant today.  A significant hindrance to the idea of expanded (inter-city) bus transit between the major upstate cities is the fact that our local transit systems are minimal, not necessarily reliable, and have limited operating hours.  A bus line between Greenville and Spartanburg would likely stop  only in downtown (or possibly a couple additional places along I-85), but if its riders work several miles outside downtown, then they would need to find a different way to travel there from the downtown bus terminal(s).

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$2.5 million for the GreenLink bus system in 2020 and $2 million in 2021. The public bus system had received just under $500,000 a year from the county in recent years. The county's proposed increases, along with a substantial increase in funding from the city of Greenville, will be enough to extend bus service until 11:30 p.m. The buses currently stop rolling at 7:30 p.m. Interim GreenLink Director James Keel, who attended Tuesday night's meeting, said the extended hours will start in October.

When Kernell announced his proposal for GreenLink funding — a roughly fourfold increase compared to past years — the audience erupted into applause. About 40 people wore green "GreenLink" T-shirts to show their support.

Edited by gman430
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3 hours ago, gman430 said:

$2.5 million for the GreenLink bus system in 2020 and $2 million in 2021. The public bus system had received just under $500,000 a year from the county in recent years. The county's proposed increases, along with a substantial increase in funding from the city of Greenville, will be enough to extend bus service until 11:30 p.m. The buses currently stop rolling at 7:30 p.m. Interim GreenLink Director James Keel, who attended Tuesday night's meeting, said the extended hours will start in October.

When Kernell announced his proposal for GreenLink funding — a roughly fourfold increase compared to past years — the audience erupted into applause. About 40 people wore green "GreenLink" T-shirts to show their support.

Way to go, Council! This is a really great increase to see! I hope the use of the funds will improve the quality of life for residents and improve service.

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Not totally transit related, but I didn’t want to put this in the Coffee House section. Does anyone have the Greenville News App? I get alerts just every few day it seems about a pedestrian being killed in Greenville County; really gives you an idea of how bad it is. 

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Route Changes Effective July 1, 2019

The results of the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA), which were unveiled in August 2017, included recommendations for a number of bus route changes. As a result, Greenlink held 16 community meetings throughout the months of October and November 2017, sharing information about the proposed route changes and giving the public an opportunity to provide input on the route designs.

Feedback received at the community meetings were incorporated into the routes and the Greenville Transit Authority Board of Directors voted to adopt the new routes in December 2017. The changes will go into effect July 1, 2019.

More detail

 

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Public Meeting: Proposed Trolley Route Changes

"The City of Greenville launched the Heart of Main, Top of Main, Arts West and Augusta trolley routes in August 2017, and after operating the routes for two full seasons and analyzing ridership data, Greenlink has identified ways to improve performance on the trolley network.
As a result, Greenlink is holding two drop-in style public meetings to give customers a chance to review the proposed changes and provide input. The same information will be shared at each meeting. Customers are invited to attend the one most convenient for them and to stop by any time during the hour:
Anyone unable to attend one of the meetings can provide feedback by emailing [email protected], can call 864-298-2753, or can complete this survey until December 13: https://publicinput.com/5966 "

November 21 at Caine Halter Family YMCA 6:00-7:00PM

November 26 at Hughes Main Library 6:00-7:00PM

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