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That building is the Capitol Square Building (not to be confused with the Capitol Park Building at Griswold & State). It was one of the many buildings in the area that was constructed by Sebastian Kresge. It is undergoing a very slow, low-cost renovation into lofts...they've been working on the building for about three years now, with very little visible progress in the last 6 months.

Allan, can you expand on why it is a low-cost renovation? It there hope for renovating other unused buildings downtown, even the larger ones, in a low-cost way as well?

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Recent aerial view of downtown!  

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I think that the blue looked too bad, but paint is for covering up cinder blocks, not good brick.

I think that murals or something should be put on the nasty sides of buildings though. Fire escapes should be painted and have flowers too. I'm going off topic though.

Nice pictures everyone!

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I think that the blue looked too bad, but paint is for covering up cinder blocks, not good brick.

I think that murals or something should be put on the nasty sides of buildings though. Fire escapes should be painted and have flowers too. I'm going off topic though.

Nice pictures everyone!

Have you ever seen Cottage Inn Pizza building here in Ann Arbor? It has exactly what you are talking about LOL.

In the architecture world, we call the sides of buildings urban buildings Common walls, and the brick used on them is called, guess? Common Brick. It's usually cheaper since it was somewhat expected a neighboring building would come next door and cover up the sides. Because it was cheap, it was never nice looking because the facade determined the beauty of the building. When suburbanization came around, we saw less of common brick, but has had a redux with the return to more urban building. Except, nowadays we usually paint it a nice solid color.

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I don't know what building that is specificly, but I was thinking of Ann Arbor in general when I wrote that reply. One time I saw an alley with some paintings and a guy dancing to micheal jackson, and I think that's really great.

Now I know what the ugly part is called! :lol:

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Have you ever seen Cottage Inn Pizza building here in Ann Arbor? It has exactly what you are talking about LOL.

In the architecture world, we call the sides of buildings urban buildings Common walls, and the brick used on them is called, guess? Common Brick. It's usually cheaper since it was somewhat expected a neighboring building would come next door and cover up the sides. Because it was cheap, it was never nice looking because the facade determined the beauty of the building. When suburbanization came around, we saw less of common brick, but has had a redux with the return to more urban building. Except, nowadays we usually paint it a nice solid color.

Here is the building you are talking about:

100_1026.jpg

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Designed by Daniel Burnham, the Ford Building was completed in 1909. The Ford family was in the glass industry, and many of the products used to make glass were mined between Detroit and Toledo. The family established the Edward Ford Glass Company in the 1880s, which later merged with the Libby Glass Company, forming Libby-Owens-Ford. In the second decade of the 20th century, closed coupes became popular, creating an even stronger market for the company.

ford_bldg.jpg

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