Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

josita

Progressive Art Centers

Recommended Posts

I am doing research and am trying to find out which cities have world-class art scenes, both high and popular culture.

Besides the obvious, New York and LA (although I am interested in hearing what makes those cities top art centers also,) tell us what cities have great cultural art scenes and why. What art organizations make this happen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Charlotte has a pretty good arts scene. I beleive it had the most donated money to arts in the country, even ahead of NYC. That is pretty impressive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winston-Salem, NC is often called the "City of the Arts." Home of the Nation's first arts council and the North Carolina School of the Arts. First nationally in per capita contributions to the arts. Notable events/venues include: National Black Theatre Festival, Piedmont Opera Theater, Winston-Salem Symphony, Stevens Center for Performing Arts, Sawtooth Center for Visual Arts and the Southeastern Center for Contemparay Arts (SECCA). From a resident's point of view it is nice to have so many venues and events. The arts 'scene' is way out of scale with the population here.

I copied the text below from the Convention and Visitors Bureau website:

Why we're called the City of the Arts

How long has Winston-Salem been a center of the arts? Before John Hancock put his big signature on the Declaration of Independence, the Moravian settlers brought music and crafts to this spot of land.

So, we have some experience with it.

Winston-Salem offers more than any reasonable person would expect from a city of over 185,000 people. How did it happen? Our people made it happen.

Corporate support and individual philanthropy built Winston-Salem into an arts center. The first arts council in America was established in Winston-Salem, and the commitment to the arts continues to this day. The council is one of only a handful in the country that raises more than $1 million a year, which it uses to support a large number of local arts organizations.

We're the home of the National Black Theatre Festival. The home of Old Salem, a living history town. Home of the North Carolina School of the Arts. Home to a dozen museums, and the home of local artists and their studios, where you can see and shop.

Click here to discover all our offerings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unfortunately the thread is turned into "this is my hometowns art scene"....

I don't know that much about art so I can't answer the original question, but I can shed some light on my hometown.

In my opinion, Miami hit the big time with Art Basel Miami Beach.

http://www.artbaselmiamibeach.com

The arts scene here is expectedly Latin American in nature. Cuban, Haitian, South American artists thrive here. There seems to be a lot of support for local artists, but the museum/gallery scene is not what I think it should be. Hopefully that changes in the near future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sarasota is considered by many the "cultural" center of Florida. Several museums as well as the Ringling art school. I've been to several decent art shows there (Phil Noto was the best).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am doing research and am trying to find out which cities have world-class art scenes, both high and popular culture.

Besides the obvious, New York and LA (although I am interested in hearing what makes those cities top art centers also,) tell us what cities have great cultural art scenes and why.  What art organizations make this happen?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Nashville's Art of Country/Folk Music is exported across the globe and makes for a world-class scene with thousands of international travellers visiting the city ever year for concerts and festivals. The Academy of Country Music along with other independent groups work to preserve this distinctly American music and art.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlotte has a pretty good arts scene. I beleive it had the most donated money to arts in the country, even ahead of NYC. That is pretty impressive.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Your statement is a little misleading. I think Charlotte might lead the nation in per capita arts spending. However, the area has a way to go before it's ranked above many cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your statement is a little misleading.  I think Charlotte might lead the nation in per capita arts spending.  However, the area has a way to go before it's ranked above many cities.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

^ I agree. Although it does help, donations and money do not necessarily equate quality. But, Charlotte is on the rise. :)

(BTW I took a look at who donates to the arts in Charlotte, and the two biggest donors are Bank of America and Wachovia. Without those two companies, donations would be far less.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I agree. Although it does help, donations and money do not necessarily equate quality. But, Charlotte is on the rise.  :)

(BTW I took a look at who donates to the arts in Charlotte, and the two biggest donors are Bank of America and Wachovia. Without those two companies, donations would be far less.)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I just read an article about how the two banks are in a friendly competition for supporting the arts in Charlotte. Hopefully they don't end up having too much influence over the scene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read an article about how the two banks are in a friendly competition for supporting the arts in Charlotte.  Hopefully they don't end up having too much influence over the scene.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

^ Too late. LOL Outside of BofA and Wachovia (and maybe Duke Energy), Charlotte lacks other significant financial donors to the arts. I don't think anyone should worry about the influence thse two corporations have over the arts scene. They should worry if one of these two companies relocates, merges, or goes bankrupt. Talk about putting all your eggs in one basket...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlotte has a pretty good arts scene. I beleive it had the most donated money to arts in the country, even ahead of NYC. That is pretty impressive.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What do you mean about the "most donated money to the arts in the country" ...

is this individual contributions? government? foundation? what type of donated money?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am doing research and am trying to find out which cities have world-class art scenes, both high and popular culture.

Besides the obvious, New York and LA (although I am interested in hearing what makes those cities top art centers also,) tell us what cities have great cultural art scenes and why.  What art organizations make this happen?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I've lived in Chicago, LA, Austin, Nashville, Atlanta, and now Houston. I think Houston easily has the best art scene in the South. The Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH) is the country's sixth largest, and has about 40,000 members who pay $50 yearly. Of course the super rich and the corporations do the most, and a two story wall has their names chisled in. The museum is made up of 5 buildings (2 for exhibits, the school, administration, and parking garage) and a sculpture garden. The MFAH is situated in one of the most fascinating districts in the country, known here as the Museum District.

Nearby art museums are the Contemporary Art Museum and the Menil Collection. Other museums are the Museum of Natural Science, Museum of Medical Science, Holocaust Museum, Children's Museum. The museum district is adjacent to Montrose, which has been Houston's long time bohemian/artist/gay/student district, about six square miles in area. Montrose contains the Art League of Houston facility (an old house on Montrose BL) and the Menil Collection, founded by Dominique de Menil. This beautiful museum occupies a long city block along with the Rothco Chapel grounds. All of the houses facing this block on 3 sides are owned by the Menil Foundation and are painted a kind of charcoal grey, and leased to the occupants. When Ms. Menil died a few years ago, her body was propped up on her death bed for the wake, a scene reported on in the New Yorker.

A college friend who grew up here and now living in the SF Bay area had heard of the changes going on in Houston but hasn't been here in 15 years. I sent him the following message:

"Lee: Interesting to hear what an out of towner has to say about this place. The museum district has really taken off with more than a dozen museums. The

grandaddy is the MFA of which I'm a member, which has a fantastic new building. There is lots of new housing in the that area, a couple of new residential high rises and lots of new 4-5 story loft buildings and complexes between the museum district and downtown. Hermann Park, the zoo, Rice U, Mecham Fountain, Sam Houston, and several beautiful churches round out the offerings of that area, it's very impressive. There's a light rail passing through the corridor too. People around here have put out an enormous amount of creative energy to make the place better and to counteract the negative image of the town. My bank is near the museum district and I remember when I opened my account there in 1989 I felt that the area and the city as a whole was scary and depressing, if you can imagine that, but it has been totally transformed. I think it would be interesting for you to visit sometime. "

The drawback to all this development is that the area, including Montrose, is getting very expensive by Red State standards. It is less hippy-friendly and more yuppy-friendly. There are hundreds of 3-4 story townhouses all over Montrose now. The upside is lots of fantastic eating and small shops, etc. Montrose BL is the only street in town where you have several dozen establishhments with outdoor seating in front. Montrose BL intersects with Westheimer which is another very interesting thouroughfare with clubs, restaurants and antique stores and shops for more than a mile.

Pardon the length of this post but Houston gets very little play on this site. It is fascinating to watch this place, which is huge and booming, attain world class status.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pardon the length of this post but Houston gets very little play on this site. It is fascinating to watch this place, which is huge and booming, attain world class status.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I agree.. Houston is quickly outpacing Chicago in population size .. so I've heard .. I don't have any hard stats. Houston is definately one city that I will be studying ..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree.. Houston is quickly outpacing Chicago in population size .. so I've heard .. I don't have any hard stats.  Houston is definately one city that I will be studying ..

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Houston city/metro is large, but not even close to the size of metro Chicago. I can't comment on the arts in either city, but for fairness to Houston, I felt that should be mentioned.

I can account for Atlanta and have to say for such a rising city, it's arts scene is not good. Additionally, I don't think that people in this region really care about such things greatly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.