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bobliocatt

New City Slogan Unveiled

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JACKSONVILLE, FL (AP) -- Forget about the "River City" or "The Bold New City of the South."

Those Jacksonville slogans have been replaced with "Jacksonville. Where Florida Begins" just in time for the Super Bowl.

The Dalton Agency produced the new Jacksonville branding campaign under a 91-thousand dollar contract. The new campaign is being rolled out about two months before Jacksonville hosts Super

Bowl 39 on February sixth.

The campaign includes billboards, print and T-V advertising, yard signs, T-shirts, an Internet site, and even coffee mugs.

It's the brainchild of Mayor John Peyton. Peyton is announcing the campaign tonight at a meeting of the Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce.

He says Jacksonville has the ocean and the river, great sports, a booming economy and a great quality of life.

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it's a decent slogan from a marketing perspective. i'm sure it will play well for tourism and (primarily) economic development campaigns.

that being said, jacksonville will always be "the river city" to me. no marketing campaign is going to make me, or thousands of others, stop considering "the river city" jax's nickname.

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Yeah, I still like "The River City". I've even drawn up plans for a mix-use development respectively named "River City Plaza". How unique, huh? lol

But aside from our old and somewhat common name, I like this new slogan! Some people tend to think of Florida as everything south of Orlando, and perhaps this will help better connect us with the state.

And I don't understand how that cost 91,000. I mean, really, what exactly did this company do? lol

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Pensacola is going to be LIVID. :D

I'm kind of happy to have moved past "River City", it is a little too Music Man for me (There's trouble, right here in River City) and "Bold New City of the South", well, without the beginning "B" would have been more accurate and emphasized Jacksonville's deep, rich history.

$91,000, eh? It is really a decent price and the money was spent locally so I guess it could be seen as a double investment.

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Just to remind everybody that Jacksonville, despite appearances, really is in Florida. I hear they have beaches and everything.

I'm a little confused about what the mean by the beginning. Where Florida began (history)? Northernmost Florida (geographic)? Where Florida will begin (future)?

I don't really like any of the possible meanings.

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Jacksonville has roots that extend way back as being a true river city... a real, viable port in the south. Why try and create something new? The money could have just as well spent, or better, to polish "The River City" concept. I mean heck, aren't we bringing in cruise ships on the "river" for housing for the Super Bowl? The river is the reason our city is here and has flourished for so many years, not the beach, and certainly not it's adjacency to GA. The river is the reason the railroad flourished here as well, because it was a port, and early intermodal. I honestly feel it's another one of Peyton's poor decisions to waste money on something that is unecessary.

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Jacksonville has roots that extend way back as being a true river city... -snip-

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I agree that too much emphasis is being placed on the beaches; Jacksonville, a city with beaches, has been losing its old, metropolitan appeal since the 1950s. The sprawl has taken over the city (Neither the current nor past mayor lived anywhere near Downtown).

Although Jacksonville's prosperity grew around the river, the same could be said for cattle (remember that we started out as Cowford and North Floridians used to be known as "Crackers" because of the cracking of bull whips). There are other great river cities (Indianapolis, Louisville, New Orleans, Minneapolis/St. Paul, etc..) and each has carried that moniker at one time or another. At least this new slogan is unique and in that uniqueness I think lay a worthwile investment.

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well, its better than "the double wide city" or "the city where slim whitman yodles". i think it is geopraphical>>> anyways, call it what they want... i just don't see a need for it????

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And I don't understand how that cost 91,000.  I mean, really, what exactly did this company do?  lol

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

According to the Business Journal out today, Dalton "donated" $150,000 in creative fees, in addition to the $91,000 budget.

The campaign is the top headline of today's edition. There is an editorial is support of the campaign but criticizing the late start.

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well, its better than "the double wide city" or "the city where slim whitman yodles".  i think it is geopraphical>>>  anyways, call it what they want...  i just don't see a need for it????

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I had to comment on this post. Why is it that people that move to Jax from somewhere else or visit, seem to have such a higher opinion of it than the long time residents (especially natives)?

Does Jacksonville have mobile homes, yes, what city in the South doesn't? The income levels in Jax are at or usually higher than the other major cities in Florida and most of the Southeast.

Yes, I know that the city use to have noxious odors from the paper mills and everyone had to stop on I-95 and other roads to pay the annoying tolls. But guess what, both of those things were removed close to 20 years ago.

Yes, there are still certain retail and restaurant chains that have yet to build in Jax, but that is largely a factor of numbers. With the St. John's center opening that will lessen somewhat, and will lessen even further with the second phase. Additionally, now that Jax is a top 50 market, it will also now be on more national radar screens.

Yes, there are some schools that have low scores and less than desireable reputations. But if you look at the details, the socio-economic factors pretty much determine where each school ranks. That is no different than Miami, Tampa or any other large city.

The biggest problem Jackosnville has is that the local officials don't see it the city for it's true size or potential. This is reflected by the fact that no push is being made for a larger convention center when the need and potential is obvious. It is further reflected by the fact the city won't pony up the money to fully promote and execute this new marketing campaign.

Jacksonville doesn't have a bad image or a good image, it has NO image. This is the perfect time (with the Super bowl upcoming), for Jacksonville to define itself to the rest of the nation and the world. Why pay for the development of the campaign and not fully execute it. Who knows when or even if another Super Bowl will come to Jax. Seize the opportunity while you have it!

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This is a great post vic. There is a self-esteem problem for people who have been here a long time. It stems from all the things you have mentioned and a "buy-in" to negative news and perceptions. (and I'm not saying cubans post was intentionally negative, its an easy joke to make, like you said, anywhere in the south)

Its easier to make a face, discount, disbelieve, and mock folks who are changing incity neighborhoods because largely your (Jacksonville folks with hang ups about the city) suburban butt will always be on a suburban couch, SUV nestled in its two car garage. For the most part you won't reap any of the rewards of not living in a two hour commute neighborhood (gated or otherwise). You'll be a slave to whatever mall is reachable and whatever private school you can afford at the expense of deforestation and wet land destruction.

But my firm started developing in 1998 on the eastside of Springfield, which was more like the Bronx than Bal Harbour at the time. We decided to not try to change peoples minds, but to find and work with people who are looking for this kind of revitalization. WHo knows how many hours of useless politicking I've saved. THere are thousands of folks who want green, new urban growth that utilizines our city's great grid and assets (St johns and others).

Getting the banks to believe was the toughest, because you do need them. One project on a credit card will teach you that. Once the banks see it, the pessimistic suburbanites can all be laughed at while I sip on a happy hour cocktail at 5:35 and they are still trying to get over in that lane on JTB.

:ph34r:

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yo, vicupstate>>> chill out... i am a native to Jacksonville and after having lived in NYC and Miami for more years than i wanted, i chose to come back to j-ville. not only come back, build a home here, work here and try to do my thing here. But also being a native i have seen this city change from some back woods "home of southern Rock" town to a pretty decent metropolis with plenty left to grow. But i remember back in the early 90's when the Jacksonville Jaguars were born, and a national sports radio guy stated that "the land of 4X4's and mobile homes has an NFL team" that the city had a less than respectable rap. and even recently there was some comments concerning the Super Bowl and the city's "low country" tendencies.

which does bring up the SB... there were a number of plans and promises made that were to happen before the SB, like the demolition of the old Fuller Warren was to be completed, the jacksonville landing to be renovated, and a few others??? the SB is a great thing to happen to the city, if the city actually bucks up and does the necessary things to make it a success.. or it can be a let down to those visiting?? i guess time will tell...

i guess the real question is: "how many people actually remember a city's slogan?" >>> i mean here is a city that has two major interstates coverge>> I-10 and I-95.... couldn't we use that to our advantage???

and i agree whole heartedly, the politicans that run this city should put in the effort>> they control the money and where it goes. but it also takes the people to get involved. anyways, that's it.

Thanks

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Its easier to make a face, discount, disbelieve, and mock folks who are changing incity neighborhoods because largely your (Jacksonville folks with hang ups about the city) suburban butt will always be on a suburban couch, SUV nestled in its two car garage. For the most part you won't reap any of the rewards of not living in a two hour commute neighborhood (gated or otherwise). You'll be a slave to whatever mall is reachable and whatever private school you can afford at the expense of deforestation and wet land destruction.

:ph34r:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You can't discount the "suburbanites" completely though. Right now they are the ones who are the majority of the infusion in downtown and it's surrounding burroughs. I live in Orange Park, drive an SUV, work downtown, and commute daily. That does not however stop me from wanting to see downtown flourish and thrive just because I don't and won't live there. A lot of my money goes to downtown and I frequent downtown on the weekends and weekday nights. As far as not reaping any of the rewards, speak for yourself. It is a persons perogitive to visit downtown or not. Everyone who visit downtown can "reap the benefits" if the infrastructure is in place and working. Just because I commute to downtown and work in one bulding does not mean that I don't frequent others. And if the infrastructure was in place I would frequent more.

I think you need to step down off of your soap box a little and realize that there are more people who want downtown to thrive than just those living there. A lot of people llive nearby in San Jose or even in Lake shore for that matter who spend a majority of their free time downtown or thereabouts. I am no slave to whatever mall is nearby, nor do I live in a deforested, cookie cutter, wetland destructive community. And as far as schools go, look at the FCATS pal... That speaks volumes to parents with children in school of even parents planning for there children to go to school, public or private.

Kudos to you for living in what you are trying to promote but don't ever knock those who still strongly support the movement but choose to live on the outskirts. Cubans post may not have been intentially negative, but I feel yours was, and my "suburban A$$" takes offense to it.

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I think you need to step down off of your soap box a little and realize that there are more people who want downtown to thrive than just those living there. 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Stepping down. Good points. It did sound like a stereotype of all suburbanites which I did not intend. Sorry. Not all suburbanites contribute to the negatives, for sure. I do think though that the majority of folks who do not intend to utilize downtown and the incity will avoid embracing it as you have. I certainly hope I'm wrong and will gladly eat crow, if so. WHile your commute may increase by 30 minutes in the next five years, it simply won't downtown and could even improve with transit oriented development. The suburban fenced-in American ideal, many think, will prove unsustainable if its continued be built-out on a suburban layout, increasing traffic congestion and mowing down Floridas natural resources.

It means alot that you will spend time and money downtown. Thanks for that and for helping me keep perspective. Springfield (1869) for that matter is our first suburb (even though Brooklyn could debate this, as it was platted in 1868). I'm sure they thought that was fringe-development back in the day.

I'll do better to not lump all my new urban gripes on specific threads if you'll forgive me. Good posts today...

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yo, vicupstate>>>  chill out...  i am a native to Jacksonville and after having lived in NYC and Miami for more years than i wanted, i chose to come back to j-ville.  not only come back, build a home here, work here and try to do my thing here.  But also being a native i have seen this city change from some back woods "home of southern Rock" town to a pretty decent metropolis with plenty left to grow.  But i remember back in the early 90's when the Jacksonville Jaguars were born, and a national sports radio guy stated that "the land of 4X4's and mobile homes has an NFL team" that the city had a less than respectable rap.  and even recently there was some comments concerning the Super Bowl and the city's "low country" tendencies.

Thanks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'll be willing to bet that that national sports radio guy had spent little if any time in Jacksonville when he said that.

It's precisely that reason why a marketing campaign is needed. If that guy and those of his mindset actually saw pictures and images of the beaches, marshes, the city skyline (especialy at night), San Marco Square, beautiful victorian homes in Springfield or Riverside, oak-lined streets like Mardarin Blvd, etc. they would have a better opinion of Jax. They might even take the time to see for themselves what Jax is like.

My point is that even great cities that everyone like,s have a downside. New Orleans can be a lot of fun, and it has an ambience all its own. But they would kill to have Jacksonville's economy and income level. Chicago is a beautiful urban environment, but their schools are known nationally as under-performing. Even as maligned as the Jacksonville school system is, it is far superior to theirs.

It's all well and good to kid about the negative images of one's home town or state, amongest other locals. However, if the locals don't embrace and promote the positives of the area, you certainly can't expect the image to ever change.

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You can't discount the "suburbanites" completely though.  Right now they are the ones who are the majority of the infusion in downtown and it's surrounding burroughs.  I live in Orange Park, drive an SUV, work downtown, and commute daily.  That does not however stop me from wanting to see downtown flourish and thrive just because I don't and won't live there.  A lot of my money goes to downtown and I frequent downtown on the weekends and weekday nights.  As far as not reaping any of the rewards, speak for yourself. It is a persons perogitive to visit downtown or not.  Everyone who visit downtown can "reap the benefits" if the infrastructure is in place and working.  Just because I commute to downtown and work in one bulding does not mean that I don't frequent others.  And if the infrastructure was in place I would frequent more. 

I think you need to step down off of your soap box a little and realize that there are more people who want downtown to thrive than just those living there.  A lot of people llive nearby in San Jose or even in Lake shore for that matter who spend a majority of their free time downtown or thereabouts.  I am no slave to whatever mall is nearby, nor do I live in a deforested, cookie cutter, wetland destructive community.  And as far as schools go, look at the FCATS pal...  That speaks volumes to parents with children in school of even parents planning for there children to go to school, public or private.

Kudos to you for living in what you are trying to promote but don't ever knock those who still strongly support the movement but choose to live on the outskirts.  Cubans post may not have been intentially negative,  but I feel yours was, and my "suburban A$$" takes offense to it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think Urban Core's frustrations are more pointed toward the less open-minded folks than yourself. I use to live in a neighborhood very much like Springfield and I can relate. I appreciate that you want downtown and the urban areas to realize their full potential. You also put your time and patronage where your mouth is.

Thanks for that as well.

I THINK what Urban Core, and definitely myself, don't appreciate are the close-minded people that think that only murder and mayhem go on after dark in downtown and in transitioning neighborhoods like Springfield. The ones that think just because an area had a crime problem at one time, that it can never change. The ones that think only an unfit parent would try to live there with a young child. The ones that won't even consider a school just because not surburban (read:white majority). The journalist (if I may use that term loosely) that pins the name of your neighborhood to any event that that happpened north of the St. Johns. The realtors and/or lenders that steer clients away from an area they are not comfortable with, even though it is exactly what the client is looking for. I could go on, but I think I've made my point.

Of course, if I'm off the mark, UrbanCore is quite capable of speaking for himself. I just wish more people were as open minded and understanding of the benefits (to everyone) of a vibrant urban area.

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close minded people, hmm... hold on a minute. the last time i watched the local news about 80% of the crime was going on "north of the St. Johns", now don't get me wrong... there is crime everywhere, but you would have to agree that there are areas that have more crime than others?? and as far as banks and realtors, they are business people and they evaluate things with such terms as "risk" and "appreciation", when money is involved, everybody gets cautious... anyways, once again the topic has been forgotten here>>> should we spend 91,000 dollars on the words, "Jacksonville, where florida begins." well, if it means that more business and a Macy's comes to town, then money well spent.

how about: "Jacksonville, more than a rest stop."

Thank you.

OR "Jacksonville, Joe Piscopo went to college here."

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how about: "Jacksonville, more than a rest stop."

Thank you.

OR "Jacksonville, Joe Piscopo went to college here."

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I actually heard someone criticizing the new slogan and stated that it would be better understood if it read "Jacksonville, where Georgia begins!" Not saying that is right, but I think it is definitely going to take more than a slogan and some fancy advertising to change the imagery of Jacksonville. Anyone can come up with a fancy phrase and find a few photo op's around town and make it look like something it's not. Take a look at the picture below that I took a month or so ago in downtown. It make the urban situation downtown look like a viable situation.

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I guess I fall on the side that see's the slogan as a waste of money. I would have rather seen that $91,000 go to into the pot to help jump start renovation projects like The Barnett and the Laura Street Trio or to clean up an urban park, like Confederate Park or help finish a streetscaping project like Main or Hendricks.

This city already has all of the ingredients to have a better image, regardless of whether it has a slogan or not. If officials really want to enhance the image of Jax, they need to put their money where their mouths are at. Start cleaning up places like Brooklyn, East Jax, or Durkeeville, speed up the process to get our historical significant buildings renovated instead of letting them decay by neglect. Find ways to expand the skyway within walking distance of hot urban areas like Five Points, San Marco Square, or the Stadium district, look at running commuter rail to St. Augustine or Orange Park, avoid deals like the Shipyards Fiasco, and so on.

In other words develop and endorse a vision that enhances the city's quality of life and you will see that the image thing will take care of itself. For all who hated Delaney and his administration, at least he had a vision. Its been over a year now and I still haven't seen Peyton's.

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For all who hated Delaney and his administration, at least he had a vision.  Its been over a year now and I still haven't seen Peyton's.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think it's re-election.

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