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Cotuit

PHOTOS: Not quite a white Christmas

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We didn't quite get a White Christmas in Providence, more like a White Boxing Day with 8-10 inches of snow yesterday and last night.

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Work continues at the GTECH site despite the snow.

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This pedestrian tunnel runs under Memorial Boulevard between Waterplace Park and Union Plaza. The tiles on the walls are Providence's September 11th Memorial created by area school children.

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Looking across the Basin in Waterplace Park, the Rhode Island State House is on the hill.

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A snow covered riverwalk with the Citizens Bank Building in the background.

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More of the Waterplace Park Basin.

I took these pics before work, it was hella cold and the wind was whipping up the snow so I stopped taking pictures and rushed to work.

These pictures I took after work, it was a bit warmer and the wind had died down so it was a little nicer for picture taking. These are taken on College Hill and then I worked my way back down to the river.

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The University Club on Benefit Street.

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RISD Museum, Benefit Street.

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University Club and Frazier Terrace.

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RISD's College Building and the Courthouse.

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RISD's College Building.

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Providence Atheneum.

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Some brick row houses on Benefit Street.

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More of Benefit Street.

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College Street, I think this building belongs to Brown University.

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Dome of the Old Stone Bank from behind.

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Looking down College Street toward Downcity from Benefit Street.

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The Courthouse from Monument Landing.

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Monument Landing, in better weather I have my lunch here.

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College Street Bridge, Citizens Bank Building in the background.

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Providence River from RISD.

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RISD Store and RISD Auditorium from the Canal Walk.

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Washington Bridge from near the Confluence of the rivers.

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I know a lot of people who only ever visited Providence when it was about 10 degrees. We're open in the summer too you know. :lol:

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The river relocation project designs were inspired largely by Venice (we even have gondolas during the summer), of course seeing it in the snow gives it a more Eastern European feel. And the buildings in Providence are more Eastern European flavoured than Venetian.

The Benefit Street area is the best part of the city. Benefit Street was the first historic district created in the country, nearly every building on the street is at least 100 years old, if not considerably older. I'm lucky to work in this extremely esthetically pleasing neighbourhood.

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Great pics! Providence is a great city. I wish I had more time to see the city when I passed through last year.

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I just recently took some photos of Benefit recently as well (minus the snow). I'll post them when I get some time.

Benefit Street, Providence's "Mile of History," for those of you who have never seen it, is in my opinion one of the most beautiful streets in the U.S., and as Cotuit's pictures show, it's a stone's throw from the commerical center. What wonderful contrast.

- Garris

Providence, RI

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My pictures of Benefit Street are all taken in a two block stretch. As Garris pointed out, the street runs for a mile or more, and is equally as stunning along it's entire route.

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The river relocation project designs were inspired largely by Venice (we even have gondolas during the summer), of course seeing it in the snow gives it a more Eastern European feel. And the buildings in Providence are more Eastern European flavoured than Venetian.

The Benefit Street area is the best part of the city. Benefit Street was the first historic district created in the country, nearly every building on the street is at least 100 years old, if not considerably older. I'm lucky to work in this extremely esthetically pleasing neighbourhood.

As much as I LOVE to brag about Providence, becuase it's incredible, Benefit Street actually wasn't the country's first historic district - it wasn't listed until 1971, even though the restoration of the street by private citizens had been going on since the mid-50s. The first historic district in the country was designated in Charleston, South Carolina (where else?), in 1931. Immediately after that, New Orleans desginated one in 1936, Alexandria, VA in 1946, and so on. College Hill/the greater East Side is not the largest historic district in the country either, contrary to what lots of people believe. That title is held by downtown Savannah, GA, and held by a wide margin at that. That doesn't count the various other large historic districts in Savannah that lie outside of downtown, either.

Regardless, though, Benefit street is equally admirable on sheer age and physical beauty alone, not to mention its close proximity to downtown, and its size relative to the size of the city. While not being the first, or largest historic district, it's still the largest collection of original colonial architecture in the country.

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As much as I LOVE to brag about Providence, becuase it's incredible, Benefit Street actually wasn't the country's first historic district - it wasn't listed until 1971, even though the restoration of the street by private citizens had been going on since the mid-50s. The first historic district in the country was designated in Charleston, South Carolina (where else?), in 1931. Immediately after that, New Orleans desginated one in 1936, Alexandria, VA in 1946, and so on. College Hill/the greater East Side is not the largest historic district in the country either, contrary to what lots of people believe. That title is held by downtown Savannah, GA, and held by a wide margin at that. That doesn't count the various other large historic districts in Savannah that lie outside of downtown, either.

Regardless, though, Benefit street is equally admirable on sheer age and physical beauty alone, not to mention its close proximity to downtown, and its size relative to the size of the city. While not being the first, or largest historic district, it's still the largest collection of original colonial architecture in the country.

benefit street is the longest contiguous collection of historic buildings in teh country though.

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