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Columbia Area Developments

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20 hours ago, ColaFan said:

I think the City would be better served building out the waterfront park than addressing Finlay right now.   

That would be more of an attraction and would unite the Columbia side river, which I think is more valuable.   I think that's more likely to push development as well.  

The problem with Finlay, I guess more than anything, is that it is not terribly convenient to many people because there is relatively little downtown population and this being a southern city people aren't likely to drive in to a place where you might see homeless.

Totally agree with you. In theory the waterfront park should be paid for through the Penny Tax program. Unfortunately the whole project will be delayed by the SCANA black tar cleanup. I also wonder if the Guignard family will push back ion any designs that they do not like. That could further delay the approval process.

On 8/19/2016 at 4:10 PM, mpretori said:

I think the main thing here is the lack of tax dollars the city has. USC has got to start paying taxes, it's the only way the city can provide adequate services. 

Never going to happen. The best bet is a trend that is actually happening: public-private partnerships. USC will still try to take some of the property off of the tax rolls, but there is an argument for making things like the IBM building taxable. 

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Hotel occupancy rates in Columbia are topping out at the highest numbers in years, driving up room rates and drawing the attention of hoteliers looking for opportunities in the Capital City’s growing downtown.

The growth is attributed to a bigger University of South Carolina student body, more soldiers set to be trained at Fort Jackson, improved tourist attractions and an exploding restaurant, microbrewery and bar scene...

The downtown occupancy rate is 76.9 percent, the highest since the Columbia Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau started segregating the district five years ago. City-wide, the rate has risen from 60.7 percent in 2012 to 67.8 percent so far this year.

Downtown, the average nightly room rates have risen from $115.24 in 2012 to $138.55 today.

It ain’t Manhattan, but it’s a big jump for a city not previously known for anything approaching high prices, outside of the occasional Gamecock football weekend or the Republican and Democratic political primary seasons.

“Those are the highest numbers I’ve seen since I’ve been here,” said Ellen, who arrived in Columbia from hotel-saturated Myrtle Beach in 1989...

Most potential developers, [Fred] Delk, [executive director of the Columbia Development Corp.] said, are contemplating small 80- to 100-room, high-priced boutique hotels like Aloft, or large 200- to 250-room full service hotels. And they want to be centrally located to The Vista and a resurgent Main Street...

But the city will probably require developers to pitch in on new garages in the future, particularly in the Vista.

One glaring deficit for downtown is a lack of full-service hotels. There are only three – the Hilton, the Courtyard and the Marriott. And the prospect of another will likely be tied to what experts say is a much-needed expansion of the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, by far the smallest venue of its type in the state.

“It’s difficult to bring large conventions in here because Columbia is competing with Myrtle Beach, Charleston and Greenville,” Champaneri said. “But if they can get an expansion of the convention center, that would make a real difference in the market.”

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While it's true that USC doesn't pay taxes, I they do require city resources and I feel like I read somewhere that they do pay fees to the City. But even if they don't let's not forget how much USC's location contributes to the city's tax base through sales, real estate transactions, and development generated by the private sector's desire to serve the students and staff.

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http://www.wltx.com/mb/sports/ncaa/usc-gamecocks/usc-wont-bid-for-march-madness-games/323181803

 

They bring up a great topic here about Columbia not having enough hotel space to host such huge events.  Makes me wonder how many hotels are planned or needs to be built in Columbia in the next few years to handle the constant fluctuation of people

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A developed is purchasing all of the lots between Five Guys and Eighmile Branch Creek on Forest Drive (at the crossing with Trenholm). The plan is to develop a small village-style shopping center. It would be an improvement over the strip mall style buildings currently there.

http://www.thestate.com/news/business/article109198752.html

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Not sure where to put this, but you may have heard that Columbia is getting a new public charter school for the arts. According to their website, the Midlands Arts Conservatory (MAC) will open in August, 2017. MAC will have a focus on the visual arts, theater, dance and music. Go to https://www.facebook.com/MidlandsArtsConservatory/  and http://midlandsartsconservatory.org .

They will be holding two informational meetings for parents and the community: on Saturday January 7 at 4:00 in the North Main branch of the Richland Public Library, and on Sunday, January 8 at 3:00 in the second floor theatre at the main branch of the Richland Public Library.

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On 9/21/2016 at 6:47 PM, growingup15 said:

http://www.wltx.com/mb/sports/ncaa/usc-gamecocks/usc-wont-bid-for-march-madness-games/323181803

 

They bring up a great topic here about Columbia not having enough hotel space to host such huge events.  Makes me wonder how many hotels are planned or needs to be built in Columbia in the next few years to handle the constant fluctuation of people

I don't quite understand how Columbia has enough hotel rooms to support conventions and football games and USC graduation, etc and not enough to support the NCAA tournament. 

I think the bigger concern was perhaps that the existing hotels did not have availability for the featured dates.  

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Richland County purchased 1,300+ acres, enough space to build 5.3 million sq ft of office space and Class A technology and manufacturing buildings, in Blythewood with plans to develop it into Blythewood Business Park in an effort to attract big-name companies, create more job opportunities, increase tax revenue, and more.

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