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Gainesville projects

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Original article

Article published Jan 2, 2005

Big projects revisited

Whatever happened to those really grand projects?

Patricia Crawford doesn't pay attention to the non-believers.

The Gainesville woman knows there are skeptics who doubt her plans to build a $400 million movie studio in Newberry will ever materialize.

She's aware that some would rather lump it with the projects that promise at the blueprint stage to be the first, the biggest, the best, but in the end disappear with little but rumors and speculation in their wake.

"You're always going to have the naysayers," said Crawford, who maintains that plans for the studio are progressing and that financial backing is materializing. "What are you going to do about them?"

Here's a look at five of the many large-scale projects to capture Alachua County's interest in the recent past, and an update on whether or not the big dreamers who spearheaded the proposals are still working to prove the naysayers wrong.

It would have been the tallest building in Alachua County.

Developers of the Midtown project, proposed for a four-block area at SW 2nd Avenue and SW 6th Street in Gainesville, hoped to build a high-rise complex in Gainesville that would have included a 26-story building.

Two shorter towers would have housed apartments for University of Florida undergrads and a hotel, and retail stores would have occupied the ground floor of the buildings.

UF grad Ben Schachter and his father, Marvin Schachter, who was a consultant on the project, ended three years of controversy about the project when they failed to meet a deadline in September for submitting plans to Gainesville's planning department.

Ralph Hilliard, city planning manager, said from the city's perspective, the project is now "dead, really."

"Everything has expired," Hilliard said. "The project, the process, is over."

The developers would have to start the development review process over with a new proposal, Hilliard said, and a new city height restriction would require them to apply for a special exception to build their high-rise building.

The Schachters could not be reached for comment this week.

They have not said whether they plan to file new plans for the project.

SPRINGTREE STUDIOS

Crawford unveiled the movie-studio project in 2003, outlining a plan for studios, a performing arts theater, an amphitheater, classrooms, sets including replicas of London and Paris, special effects capabilities, restaurants and other features.

Then, Crawford called Springtree Studios "the future of North Florida."

A year and a half later, Crawford said plans are still on track to build the movie studio in Newberry, and said she could file plans with the city as soon as the fourth quarter of this year.

"We are entering into a joint venture agreement with a financier, the private arm of a major public corporation," Crawford said. "I am not at liberty to release the name to you . . . Those financiers have been here. They're been in the area. They have visited several times, and we are now launching our first couple of motion pictures."

She said one of those movies features Kelly LeBrock, who starred in "Weird Science" with Anthony Michael Hall in 1985, among other movies.

Crawford said she is considering several sites for the project, which she estimated could cost about $400 million, and still has her sights set on Newberry.

For now, she said, she's been focusing on producing the movies "that would justify need for a studio."

MINOR-LEAGUE BASEBALL

The Gainesville G-Men played minor-league baseball for more than three decades before the team folded in 1958.

The Gainesville Sports Organizing Committee wants to bring minor-league ball back to Gainesville, and leaders of the group say the project is alive and well.

Jack Hughes, executive director of the committee, said the group will determine its next step after seeing what kind of state funds are available for ballpark improvements this year.

"There have been, over the last three or four years, special appropriations that have gone toward improving major- and minor-league facilities," Hughes said.

"Winter leagues and spring baseball are such a large part of the state's sports-tourism industry that there have been dollars provided to promote them."

After that, he said, the committee will turn its attention to seeking public and private partnerships to help fund the project.

Hughes said the group has been working with the owner of several minor-league teams to secure a team to play in what would be a multi-million-dollar stadium on the campus of Santa Fe Community College.

GAINESVILLE ICE RINK

When Lester and Patti Burkett opened a new Skate Station Funworks roller rink at the end of NW 76th Boulevard in Gainesville, they planned to convert their N. Main Street location into an ice rink.

But they abandoned those plans when a Toyota-Acura dealer made an offer on the building, a manager for the company said.

"It's dead in the water now," said Dave Balogh, a manager at Skate Station Funworks. "It's really just something they'd thought about doing, but aren't thinking about doing anymore."

PRO GOLF AT UF

Before the $4 million worth of renovations that produced a golf course at the University of Florida that now ranks among the top college courses, there was talk of doing more.

UF athletics officials had previously discussed building a brand-new golf course capable of luring professional tournaments to Gainesville, said Bobby Pugh, a spokesman for the school's athletics department.

But officials apparently dropped those plans following the 2001 renovations of the current course, Pugh said.

"The plans were not necessarily to build anything affiliated with the PGA, but to draw in some more tournaments from outside the area," Pugh said. "It didn't pan out. From what I've been told, there has not been any discussion about reopening those plans anytime soon."

BIG DREAMS

Residents may balk at projects that call for skyscrapers in Gainesville or laugh off visions of movie stars in Newberry.

But to the dreamers of the big dreams, the naysayers are just that.

"In any situation, particularly in an industry that a lot of people don't understand, people want immediate gratification," Crawford said. "This is such a large project. People just aren't going to see the day-to-day progress that we make."

Hughes, too, said taking a long view of an ambitious project is part of the challenge.

The committee has lured the state high school football championships and a regional air show to Gainesville, Hughes said. Why would minor-league baseball be such a stretch?

"The reality is that this is a long-term process, and patience is a virtue," Hughes said. "I tell myself that every day."

The planning officials who review such projects are quick to note that a lack of belief on the public's part has little bearing on whether or not a project succeeds.

"Generally, people in Gainesville are very peculiar about anything that's new," Hilliard said. "But there are things getting built every day that someone living in Gainesville doesn't like."

Susan Parker, a Newberry city commissioner, was president of Newberry Chamber of Commerce when Crawford unveiled the project.

Though she'll be wearing a different hat when and if the movie-studio proposal hits the Newberry City Commission for approval, she said as a business leader and a private Newberry resident she has high hopes for the project.

"I was thrilled to meet Kelly LeBrock when she was in town, and we are still very excited about the possibility of a studio in Alachua County, in Newberry," Parker said.

But she and Hilliard both said that when it came time for government review, all proposals were on equal footing.

"There are no wacky projects," Hilliard said. "Every project is treated like the same under city code."

Amy Reinink can be reached at (352) 374-5088 or [email protected]

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Original Article

Article published Jan 7, 2005

Wal-Mart's supercenter could replace Northside Park

In recent weeks, the regulars at Gainesville's Northside Park have found themselves sharing the space with a new group of visitors who aren't there to walk their dog or play a few holes on the park's disc golf course.

The newcomers - engineers and surveyors working for Wal-Mart - have been doing preliminary site work on the property to see whether, as some city officials suggest, it is suitable for one of the retailer's supercenters.

Wal-Mart officials have preliminarily agreed to putting a store at the Northside Park site, located at NW 34th Street and U.S. 441, Wal-Mart spokesman Glen Wilkens said. But before putting forth a formal proposal, the retailer's engineers must examine the site, a process that includes taking soil samples, surveying and measuring the site and noting various features of the property.

But some of those who use the site and live nearby say the process is moving too quickly.

"It seems a little premature to me," said Shawn Harrigan, a frequent park visitor and president of the Gainesville Disc Golf Club. "Nobody has really discussed any of this with the people in the community."

Harrigan and other residents said the supercenter proposal, originally suggested after the company twice failed to gain city approval for a development on a site about a mile away, at NW 53rd Avenue and U.S. 441, is making regulars nervous about the future of recreation in northwest Gainesville.

Particularly of concern for Harrigan is Gainesville's growing disc golf community. The course at Northside, built about 15 years ago, is the only one in Alachua County for the more than 200 people who regularly enjoy the sport, he said.

Disc golf is almost identical to its more commonly recognized cousin, with small discs - similar to Frisbees - thrown at baskets, rather than balls hit toward holes. The sport is growing in popularity locally, with Northside hosting the Gator Country Classic, an event on the Professional Disc Golf Association tour, as well as two statewide events each year, Harrigan said.

Eighty-five disc golfers competed in last year's Gator Country Classic for $8,801 in prize money, according to the association.

If Wal-Mart decides to situate its supercenter on Northside, the retailer will likely have to replace it with a park at the 53rd Avenue site. However, some people who rely on Northside for recreation are worried about losing the park before a replacement can be built on the 53rd Avenue site. Wooded, swampy areas, like those found at both Northside Park and the 53rd Avenue site, are ideal for the sport, which focuses heavily on dealing with obstacles, Harrigan said.

For a deal at Northside Park to go through, city officials said Wal-Mart would have to offer the larger 53rd Avenue property as a trade. In addition, the retailer would have to develop the site as a park to replace the Northside facilities.

City officials estimate replacing the amenities at the park would cost about $1 million. Wilkens said the company is prepared to replace the park's facility, including the disc golf course.

Jonathan Coron, who lives near Northside at the Northwood Oaks subdivision, said he worried about the loss of a park, especially after the recent failure of Alachua County's Better Parks-Better Roads sales tax, which would have provided funding for recreation projects.

These concerns would be mitigated if similar, or improved, facilities could be built to serve the same community, said Coron, who said his position as a wellness education specialist at Columbia Correctional Institution gave him a particularly keen interest in recreation.

"If we're going to replace one space for another, it would be in our best interest to make that space far better," Coron said. "It would be a win-win scenario instead of a win-lose."

Harrigan said replacing the facilities at Northside with a similar, nearby facility would solve most of the community's concerns. But, he said it was important that improvement of the NW 53rd Avenue site begin before construction at Northside, so that people who depend on the park have a place to go during the site's development.

Wal-Mart officials are interested in developing the Northside Park site along with a second property on Waldo Road in east Gainesville, Wilkens said.

The Waldo Road site has been pushed by commissioners and residents who have said it could help jump-start economic development on Gainesville's east side.

"We would want to do this in tandem, both sites together," Wilkens said. "It's not one before the other."

But Mayor Pegeen Hanrahan said the commission is bound to look at each proposal on its own merits.

"They consider those a package deal," Hanrahan said. "I don't think legally we can consider them a package deal."

Jeff Adelson can be reached at 374-5095 or [email protected]

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Man that's unfortunate. I had no idea the Midtown project died. Is there any other highrise projects planned for Gainesville?

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Isn't that the pits ? This Gainesvillian gets his hopes up for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a true highrise in his hometown, a project so controversial that it illicits a height cap for future such projects, then the project dies...but the height cap it fosters remains ! :(

Oh well, may be sour grapes, but the design was pretty chintzy. Looked like something better built in Kuala Lumpur.

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Too bad, Dale... so I guess that means either Beatty Towers or some building in Shands remains Gainesville's tallest?

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Too bad, Dale... so I guess that means either Beatty Towers or some building in Shands remains Gainesville's tallest?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

tivo -

The Seagle Building, downtown, remains the tallest, then Beatty Towers.

Actually, the Seagle is a distinguished building.

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Ah, cool... learned something new. It's hard to compare heights with all the hills.

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Urban streetscape

Jacksonville developer launches lofts project in Gainesville

56016_300.jpg

Every major city has one thing in common, a vibrant downtown, a downtown which serves as the nucleus or heart for an entire metropolitan area.

The word itself, downtown, even sounds like a heartbeat. This destination, this place to be, has been immortalized in countless Hollywood movies and hit television series. It is, just as Singer/Songwriter Petula Clark said, the place where you can forget your troubles, forget all your cares and where everything is waiting for you.

One local developer, Mike Langton of LB Jax Development, shares this vision of downtown and has centered his company and its subsidiary, West University Avenue Lofts LLC, around the creation of a 24-hour downtown where people live, work and play.

"We are bringing people to the urban core, creating a critical mass where residents have connectivity to the street," Langton said. "Times are changing, and we are seeing the seeds of change take hold in our city. In Jacksonville, as well as in Gainesville, there has been a shift in housing trends towards new urbanism."

Langton's company is a niche firm specializing in historic adoptive re-use projects such as the W.A. Knight building, a live/work loft apartment development in downtown Jacksonville and the Barnett Bank building, which is being renovated to be a mixed-use development consisting of luxury lofts, fine dining and a financial institution.

Langton's newest project, The Lofts at West University Avenue, is introducing upscale urban living with a twist to the heart of downtown Gainesville. The three-story mixed use development of 31 live/work residences and four retail spaces is being constructed by West University Avenue Lofts LLC.

"The Lofts at West University Avenue is an intimate urban in-fill development featuring attractive residences with open floor plans at a great value that is centrally located in the heart of downtown Gainesville," Langton said. "This location gives The Lofts residents great views of the urban streetscape and puts residents within walking distance from entertainment venues, restaurants, the University of Florida and just one block from Shands. Like our projects in Jacksonville, The Lofts at West University Avenue is a stimulus for future redevelopment in the area."

The Lofts at West University Avenue is situated on the corner of West University Avenue and South West Sixth Street in Gainesville. The development includes 31 luxury lofts and townhomes and four commercial storefronts facing West University Avenue. The lofts range in size from 670 square feet to 832 square feet, and the townhomes are sized at approximately 1,277 square feet of living space. Each of the residences offers luxury features with hardwood floors throughout, including the kitchens, ceramic tile flooring in all baths, glass-enclosed showers, crown molding in living and dining areas, custom style cabinetry and 9-foot ceilings. Paris balconies opening up to the urban streetscape below bring the excitement of bustling mid-town Gainesville in and provide an abundance of natural light through the 7-foot sliding glass doors.

The lofts and townhomes also include GE appliances, fire safety and sprinkler systems, and are pre-wired for cable television, Internet and networking. Residents will also have access to private on-site parking located in the interior of the complex. The Lofts at West University Avenue is expected to be ready for move-in by December 2005. Prices start in the $150,000s.

The Lofts at West University Avenue marketing center is located near the new development, which is just seven blocks from UF and one block from AGH/Shands, on South West Sixth Street. Since launching sales in early October, The Lofts at West University Avenue has seen tremendous success. During an onsite fall kick-off sales event, sales totaled more than $2 million. To date, of the 35 residential and commercial spaces, only 12 remain available for purchase.

"Since this project's inception, we anticipated great things," Langton said. "The buzz surrounding The Lofts at West University Avenue was been tremendous leading up to our kick-off event. The sales we experienced in only one week far exceeded our expectations."

Among the new buyers at The Lofts at West University Avenue is Jacksonville resident Louis Dyjak, who purchased a loft for his daughter, who is a freshman at UF studying engineering with plans to get her master's degree at the university.

"We were very impressed with the amenities and all The Lofts had to offer," Dyjak said. "My daughter is going to be here for several years, and we wanted her to be in a comfortable but nice living environment in a good location. The location is so convenient for students. She can ride her bike to class."

According to Langton, The Lofts at West University Avenue is appealing to many buyers in Northeast Florida who have children attending UF, who are themselves continuing their education or who commute to Shands. It also is attractive to buyers who are looking for a living space with connectivity to the street and who, like Langton, believe in the concept of new urbanism.

"We have an absolute belief in this community and this project," Langton said. "Positive things are happening in the way of redevelopment, and it's exciting to be a part of this trend."

Similar in history to Jacksonville, Gainesville also experienced a rebirth and revitalization after major fires devastated the city. New brick structures began being built throughout Gainesville, which aided in the transformation from town to city at the dawn of the twentieth century. Over the decades, Gainesville continued to prosper and was named Money Magazine's "most livable city in America" in 1995.

Gainesville is located a short drive from many of Florida's most popular cities including Jacksonville, Orlando, Tallahassee, Tampa and St. Augustine. The city and surrounding areas offer something for everyone with numerous parks, nature preserves, gardens, trails, cultural venues, entertainment, shopping, fine dining and some of the best college athletics.

For more information about The Lofts at West University Avenue, call (904) 598-1348, or visit www.gainesvillelofts.com.

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The URL doesn't work for me, but it's two buildings of 8 and 7 stories across from campus. Should break ground in a few weeks.

www.ucorners.com

Edited by Dale

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They still haven't done demolition yet, so I don't know how far off the project really is. However, I have no doubt that they will be able to sell out immediately, as the site is literally across the street from the main part of UF's campus. It's also within walking distance of lots of the popular bars and isn't that far from downtown. There are thousands of UF undergrads who would kill for that location.

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Gainesville could use some development in its downtown. I would like to see some small size, such as some 10 to 15 story buildings on some vacant lots in Gainesville. It would add a lot to the city.

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Isn't that the pits ? This Gainesvillian gets his hopes up for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a true highrise in his hometown, a project so controversial that it illicits a height cap for future such projects, then the project dies...but the height cap it fosters remains !  :(

Oh well, may be sour grapes, but the design was pretty chintzy. Looked like something better built in Kuala Lumpur.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Exactly! A high-rise building in Gainesville would be great, but that design was brutal.

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Original article

Article published Jan 2, 2005

Big projects revisited

Whatever happened to those really grand projects?

Patricia Crawford doesn't pay attention to the non-believers.

The Gainesville woman knows there are skeptics who doubt her plans to build a $400 million movie studio in Newberry will ever materialize.

She's aware that some would rather lump it with the projects that promise at the blueprint stage to be the first, the biggest, the best, but in the end disappear with little but rumors and speculation in their wake.

"You're always going to have the naysayers," said Crawford, who maintains that plans for the studio are progressing and that financial backing is materializing. "What are you going to do about them?"

Here's a look at five of the many large-scale projects to capture Alachua County's interest in the recent past, and an update on whether or not the big dreamers who spearheaded the proposals are still working to prove the naysayers wrong.

It would have been the tallest building in Alachua County.

Developers of the Midtown project, proposed for a four-block area at SW 2nd Avenue and SW 6th Street in Gainesville, hoped to build a high-rise complex in Gainesville that would have included a 26-story building.

Two shorter towers would have housed apartments for University of Florida undergrads and a hotel, and retail stores would have occupied the ground floor of the buildings.

UF grad Ben Schachter and his father, Marvin Schachter, who was a consultant on the project, ended three years of controversy about the project when they failed to meet a deadline in September for submitting plans to Gainesville's planning department.

Ralph Hilliard, city planning manager, said from the city's perspective, the project is now "dead, really."

"Everything has expired," Hilliard said. "The project, the process, is over."

The developers would have to start the development review process over with a new proposal, Hilliard said, and a new city height restriction would require them to apply for a special exception to build their high-rise building.

The Schachters could not be reached for comment this week.

They have not said whether they plan to file new plans for the project.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Seems that Gainesville has caught come of the flu from its northeast called Jacksonvilleitis, i.e., leaders and politicians can't agree on anything or get nothing done!

I have been to Gainesville and it is a beautiful, laid back but decent sized city of almost 100,000 inhabitants. Sarasota, Florida, with a population of a little over 60,000 has skyscrapers all over its downtown; Gainesville should look like St. Petersburg or even any other major Florida City; instead, it is a cowpoke college town.

The leaders in Gainesville work similar to the leaders in Jacksonville, they can never agree on anything or get anything moving or completed. A high-rise or several high-rises in downtown Gainesville would really boost the image of this already popular town notorious for its college and educational amenities.

FLORIDA SKYRISE ORDER

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How are the people in Gainesville when it comes to these new things? Do they fight on behalf of the environment? Are they NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) or do they just not like change at all? Do graduates stick around to establish families and careers in Gainesville? What do Gainesville leaders want the city to be?

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Gainesville does have some kind of a height restriction on buildings (not sure why or what the exact limit is). Some former students stay in Gainesville but there is limited work outside the university and service sector that supports it.

I think part of Gainesville's 'problem' with development has been the university's location away from downtown (13 blocks). This divide has caused there to be a "no man's land" between the immediate university area and downtown. Further, I-75 was located a good 5+ miles away from downtown, causing development to sprawl away from the main city onto the abundant cheap land. There has been some success keeping downtown alive, but certainly Gainesville's development has been dominated by commercial sprawl, low-rise apartment complexes and single family homes.

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Zed pointed to the main reasons why Gainesville does not have a large urban core: the location of I-75 away from downtown and cheaper land being the most important factors. This of course, led to sprawl.

Another important factor is the local citizens. They love Gainesville's laid back lifestyle (as do I) and do not want to see the city grow. Most of the city officials feel the same way. The downtown area has seen increased development over the past 5 years. Most of this can be credited to a few visionary developers and the election of more forward-thinking city officials. Gainesville is heading in the right direction and is slowly creating a "charming" downtown with a comfortable southern feel (think Savannah, but not).

Most graduates do not stick around. But this too is starting to change. UF students have always thought of Gainesville as a four year town. Come, have a hell of a time, leave with an excellent education, come back for football gamedays. But, as I said, this is slowly starting to change.

The current city leaders have been making field trips to other acclaimed college towns: New Haven, Madison, etc. These city officials have modeled most of the codes/ordinances/etc after these cities. Gainesville has an incredible history that is marketed very poorly. There are hundreds of structures still standing that were built in the late 1800's and very early 1900's. The biggest problem is getting private support. This too is changing. One by one, historic houses near downtown are being restored.

Gainesville does have a height restriction at (I think) six stories.

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Zed pointed to the main reasons why Gainesville does not have a large urban core:  the location of I-75 away from downtown and cheaper land being the most important factors.  This of course, led to sprawl. 

Another important factor is the local citizens.  They love Gainesville's laid back lifestyle (as do I) and do not want to see the city grow.  Most of the city officials feel the same way.  The downtown area has seen increased development over the past 5 years.  Most of this can be credited to a few visionary developers and the election of more forward-thinking city officials.  Gainesville is heading in the right direction and is slowly creating a "charming" downtown with a comfortable southern feel (think Savannah, but not). 

Most graduates do not stick around.  But this too is starting to change.  UF students have always thought of Gainesville as a four year town.  Come, have a hell of a time, leave with an excellent education, come back for football gamedays.  But, as I said, this is slowly starting to change. 

The current city leaders have been making field trips to other acclaimed college towns:  New Haven, Madison, etc.  These city officials have modeled most of the codes/ordinances/etc after these cities.  Gainesville has an incredible history that is marketed very poorly.  There are hundreds of structures still standing that were built in the late 1800's and very early 1900's.  The biggest problem is getting private support.  This too is changing.  One by one, historic houses near downtown are being restored. 

Gainesville does have a height restriction at (I think) six stories.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

As memory serves, the height restriction is 15 stories, passed recently, in reaction to the 26st. Midtown Gainesville proposal, which, ironically, went belly-up.

By the way, as a native Gainesvillian, I'd have to agree with a lot of what you said.

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What is Gainesville doing to keep the students?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Very little. Many native Gainesvillians seem to not want the students to stay around. These natives live in a college town but do not want students. It's pretty rediculous. The university is not moving, and the sooner residents and city officials begin to seriously accept and work with the university, the better off everyone will be.

Dale, the height restriction was set at 15 stories. But, I am pretty sure that Gainesville city officials met shortly after the Mid-town episode to further reduce the height restriction to six stories. I remember reading that the University Corners project is technically two stories taller than the current height restrictions for downtown. The University Corners project is eight stories.

Personally, I like the current height restriction. Gainesville has five historic districts and the city is promoting the restoration and redevelopment of these areas. A taller structure, like the 26 story building proposed a few years ago, just doesn't make sense in Gainesville. Gainesville city officials are not pushing for Gainesville to become a city like Tampa or Orlando. I, for one, am glad.

In the next five years, Gainesville is going to see a surge of redevelopment in its downtown areas. But, it will never be a huge financial center. Gainesville will continue the push to be the cultural, scientific, and educational center for the state. Not to mention, it will eventually have historic districts rivaled by no other Florida city.

Edited by Rock2uf

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^Never say never my friend. Many great cities don't have very tall buildings! Look at St. Augustine, or Washington D.C. for that matter! I see good things happening for Gainesville, but its natives need to learn to work with the University in retaining its intelligent students or this city will being to experience a major "brain drain".

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TaureanJ,

Nah, Gainesville's been experiencing a "brain drain" for as long as its existed. Very few graduated students have ever stayed around. It can't get worse, only better.

I totally agree with your statement about the number of great cities having few tall buildings. Height does not necessarily equal a nice city. I would never move to Tampa, although it does have a skyline with height. I could list at least 10 or more cities with tall buildings and a great skyline that I would never live in. Also, I will even go as far to say that a city doesn't need extremely tall buildings to achieve population density. Anyway, I appreciate the positive comments about Gainesville. We don't receive too many of those from Tallahassee.

I've been following a couple Tally threads. Looks like Tally's looking up also.

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Lord knows why Tallahassee and Gainesville have allowed ourselves to be divided over something as petty as college football. I truly believe thats where all of the bitterness lies... I see it happening now with people's changed perceptions of Miami around here.

Truth is Gainesville and Tallahassee are two of the few quality cities in the south. Like Savannah we have southern charm that other cities can't even dream of, we offer big city convienence with small city hassles. Less traffic, less crime, less pollution. Our cities still have a way to grow, and still have the opportunity to chart our futures, while many of the larger cities are what they are for quite some time good or bad.

For all of the negativity that comes from Tallahassee about Gainesville, its not about the city itself, its about them damn Gators.

Edited by TaureanJ

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TaureanJ,

Ha Ha, I hear ya. (women's college - hehe)

I actually like Tally, and, unfortunately for me (a proud Gainesville resident), I think that Tally is much further along than Gainesville in redeveloping its downtown areas. Tally has a charm of its own. I really hope the developers attempt to maintain that charm.

Have you been to downtown Gainesville recently?

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My last visit to DT Gainesville was over a year ago. I don't know why, but there is a site there that reminds me of Tallahassee... I think I have a picture of the place here... you tell me if it reminds you of anything you have there....

DS2_0043.jpg

I know I have the ability to see things that others don't, so maybe Im just looney.

Is that 10 story tower still the tallest? Is it a hotel? Im very excited for Gainesville and the project you have shown above. I was also looking forward to Gainesville getting the Gameday Center Condo, but looks like your city commission didn't approve.

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TaureanJ,

Funny pic. Uhh....well that clock looks very similar to our clock in front of the O'connel Center (by our stadium).

Yes, the Seagle Building is still the tallest building at 12 stories (I believe). Next is Beaty Towers, a pair of dorms on the south-east side of campus. Both dorms are roughly 10 stories. Next is Century Tower on campus.

Actually, the tallest structure in Gainseville is the press box of Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. But, that really doesn't count. Anyway...I'd post pics...but I haven't figured out how to do so........and right now I'm too lazy to attempt it.

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