Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Cotuit

Woonsocket

Recommended Posts

Woonsocket attracting upscale restaurants

A building is being razed in the city's historic Market Square to make way for a seafood establishment, and a Starbucks franchise is opening soon.

BY CYNTHIA NEEDHAM Journal Staff Writer | January 12, 2005

WOONSOCKET -- When two successful Martha's Vineyard restaurateurs went trolling for a site to launch their newest seafood venture, they searched Rhode Island near and far.

Newport, Narragansett and Westerly seemed nice. But it was Woonsocket that caught their eye.

Yes, Woonsocket.

"Friends of ours familiar with Woonsocket told us to take a look at the area. We agreed with them that it's a place on the upswing," said Brion McGrorty, former owner of The Wharf, a thriving waterfront restaurant and popular tourist attraction in Edgartown, and current owner of a liquor store, Town Provisions, also in Edgartown.

"Woonsocket is a great place to live and work and I think there's good potential for us in that area," he said.

Together with business partner and former Wharf manager Larry Lovejoy, McGrorty settled on a spot in the city's historic Market Square, adjacent to the Museum of Work & Culture. They plan to open what they call a slightly upscale seafood restaurant, but not an overly pricey one.

"When we looked at visibility and parking and traffic and all those things you look at when you want to open a restaurant, everything in Woonsocket fit the criteria. Plus there was great cooperation from the city," McGrorty said.

Though growing in popularity for commuters from Boston to Providence, northern Rhode Island lacks the range of upscale restaurants in other parts of the state.

After looking at other northern communities, McGrorty said he and Lovejoy settled on Woonsocket because of its "up and coming, taking off" feeling.

Theirs isn't the only upscale eatery with its sights on the city.

Starbucks is set to open a branch of its popular coffee chain in the city's Diamond Hill Road shopping district within weeks. Woonsocket officials have issued the corporation a certificate of occupancy and say the Starbucks gurus are busy putting the final touches on their newest shop.

Jeffrey Polucha, the city's director of economic development, said the new eateries are just another sign of Woonsocket's changing demographics.

"You're seeing a lot of people being attracted to this city from all over New England," Polucha said. "Woonsocket is a community that's really evolving. It's not the old mill city anymore."

The news couldn't be better for Polucha and especially Mayor Susan D. Menard, who's behind the city's new slogan, "The city on the move."

But for McGrorty and Lovejoy, the move to Woonsocket hasn't been without its problems.

With renovations under way this week at the yet-unnamed restaurant, the pair, along with developer and property owner USR Realty, a Providence-based corporation, learned that the brick building had major structural defects, requiring it to be demolished.

The group says it will not be deterred by the setback. Razing the building will give them a chance to customize the space, adding a state-of-the-art kitchen and eliminating a third floor, and it may prove less costly than renovations.

Anthony Serani, part of the trio that owns USR Realty, said they'll aim for a late-spring opening, provided they start demolition within a few weeks.

Serani dismisses the idea that an upscale restaurant may have trouble surviving in a building that has seen a string of failed eateries in recent years, including several seafood restaurants.

"Not everyone can run a restaurant. You really need to do your homework and know what it takes to make it work and [McGrorty's] done that successfully for a long time on the Vineyard," he said.

He and McGrorty also reject the idea that their restaurant may stumble in a community where almost 20 percent of the population lives in poverty.

"I've known Woonsocket for a long time," Serani said. "And I've seen real change over the past 10 years. Now when I mention Woonsocket, even up in Massachusetts, people say, 'I hear things are turning around there.' I think the perception of this place is changing and maybe all it takes is something like this to change perceptions."

From The Providence Journal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Helps to have CVS etc. in the neighborhood. But this is in part due to the real pioneers such as Chan's and, more recently, Gian Carlo's, upscale establishments that have found a willing market in Woony. It's not just dynamite anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

City draws still another condo project

BY CYNTHIA NEEDHAM Journal Staff Writer | January 19, 2005

WOONSOCKET -- In a landscape bustling with upmarket revitalization projects, another one may soon be on its way.

A Massachusetts developer plans to rehabilitate two abandoned mill structures along the Blackstone River for use as a "vibrant residential condominium development."

The 66-condominium village proposed for Allen Street will also include a third, new building and will feature large, upscale condominiums complete with fireplaces and outdoor landscaping.

The Aspen Group, a North Reading, Mass., company, has worked closely with the city administration in recent months and has agreed to purchase a swath of riverfront land for the project.

As part of the deal, the Aspen Group will demolish what the city is calling two decaying, "architecturally insignificant" buildings on the property and plans to reconfigure abutting, city-owned parcels as parking lots.

The latest in Woonsocket's waterfront revitalization projects, the Allen Street proposal promises to "improve the overall image and viability of this downtown riverfront area," Joel D. Mathews, the city's director of planning and development, told the council in a letter of support last week.

Mathews pointed to another recent mill-revitalization project, the Narragansett Knitting Mills, which sold its 26 units within weeks, as evidence of the market's strength.

City Council members say upmarket complexes make for ideal housing developments. Attracting young single professionals, they add to the city's tax base without placing stress on its already overcrowded schools.

And where young singles go, council member Normand J. Laliberte said, cash follows. The newcomers will no doubt boost local business profits and may ultimately attract new retail and entertainment ventures.

Before the Allen Street project can move forward, however, the city must hold a public hearing. Council members said they don't expect much dissent, given that the area has been something of an eyesore in recent years.

"If anything, I think people would be happy to see that area developed. It's been abandoned for awhile," council member Brian R. Blais said.

But there are other obstacles. The city must agree to cede the two abutting parcels to The Aspen Group for use as parking lots. And it will need to negotiate with the developers to create utility easements, so as to guarantee access to utility lines, Michael Annarummo, the director of administration and public works, said yesterday.

The city will hold a public hearing on Feb. 21, after which the council will vote on the abandonment legislation. In the meantime, the Zoning Board must consider several variances needed to push the project forward.

From The Providence Jurnal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Condotopia in Woonsocket

February 18, 2005

Things are bursting out condos in Woonsocket, and one reason may not be hard to find -- a few miles to the northeast, housing prices are booming in the Boston metro area. That's good news for Woonsocket, and all of Rhode Island.

Four completed projects have produced 287 condominiums, three projects with up to 42 condominiums are being built, and four projects with 148 condominiums are being planned. None of these condos are "affordable" units, subsidized by the state's taxpayers -- although to many refugees from the housing crisis in Massachusetts, they may seem that way. More than two-thirds of the completed condos have been sold to former Massachusetts residents -- newly minted Rhode Islanders.

According to Woonsocket's planning director, Joel Mathews, about half of the new or proposed units are in or near downtown. In addition, the upper floors of several commercial buildings on Main Street contain about 125 apartments, most of them recenty developed. This trend promises to bring more life to Woonsocket's central business district.

The infusion of residents downtown should support more and better shops and restaurants than the current tattoo parlors and other small enterprises. This, in turn, will make the city even more attractive to potential Rhode Islanders from north of the border.

It should be noted that 10 of the 11 projects are rehabs of old mills or other historic structures, including a courthouse and a police station. Several of the developers either have secured or are applying for state historic-preservation tax credits, without which the developments -- and their expected local and state economic spinoff -- might not be financially feasible.

The same goes for Providence and other Rhode Island communities. Woonsocket may be attractive to Massachusetts residents, but it is the tax credits that make Woonsocket attractive to developers.

From The Providence Journal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Developers of upscale condos pitch their appeal to Boston

Bernon Mills project will offer lofts at $250,000 and up

BY CYNTHIA NEEDHAM Journal Staff Writer | April 1, 2005

WOONSOCKET -- "Tough enough to work downtown, yet smart enough to live in Bernon Mills Estates."

Backed by this catchy new logo and an aggressive marketing campaign, the luxury Front Street condominium project is steaming ahead in style.

With financing secured, construction crews are remodeling the first of three stone mills while a real estate team sells the Bernon Mills brand.

But which downtown are we talking about? Main Street? Providence?

Try Boston.

Developer Steven Lima says he and a team from Coldwell Banker real estate will target buyers from the Boston metropolitan area. The idea is to convince young professionals that investing in an emerging community such as Woonsocket is a shrewd business move.

At a time when mill rehabilitation projects seem to pop up weekly, Lima says the Bernon complex will be the crown jewel of restorations -- a gated community complete with all the trimmings.

Roomy lofts and a waterfront view of the Blackstone River are just the beginning. When the project is completed, it will include a fitness center, landscaping, an on-site market and even conference space.

It's those amenities that Lima says will set Bernon Mills Estates apart. If you're attracting buyers who plan to commute to Boston, you have to assume they'll want to work from home on occasion and will likely appreciate the use of professional meeting space and convenient retail options.

That kind of attention to detail doesn't come cheap. Lima estimates the smaller units will start at $250,000, with premier lofts running well over $500,000.

The idea for the Front Street rehabilitation project began back in 2001 when Lima rented space in the aging mill complex for his small fiber-optics company. Over the next three years, he and several partners bought all seven buildings with the intention of rehabilitating three historical stone structures and demolishing the rest.

When funds dried up, the project stalled for almost a year. But on March 7, Lima secured the necessary financing and began construction on phase one, which will feature 16 mid-sized units in one of the three stone mills.

...

"People keep saying, 'Everyone is building condos. Aren't you worried that the market's getting saturated?' I like to say, 'When the car market gets saturated, Lamborghini still makes 200 cars a year because it's appealing to a different set of buyers.' That's what's going on here."

"What we're seeing here is a critical mass being developed," Jeffrey Polucha, Woonsocket's economic development director offered. "People are paying $2,500 a month to rent elsewhere when they could own something right along the river. When they see that and when they move in two years from now, you'll see new businesses sprouting up on Main Street and along the riverfront. Two years from now, we're going to see a whole different Main Street and riverfront area."

...

Lima's next goal is getting the word out. That starts with the catchy slogan and the launch of the Bernon Mills Estates Web site (www.bernonmillsestates.com), expected to be up and running in the next few weeks. The site will offer the usual floor plans and price points, plus a guide to Woonsocket and history of the old mills for all those out-of-town buyers.

Continue Reading at: ProJo.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a professional interested in moving from eastern Massachusetts to Rhode Island. I'm attracted by the affordable housing. I'm wondering what Woonsocket is like, in terms of real estate value and quality of life?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that many of us here have any first hand experience with Woonsocket such that we could give you honest valuable advice about it.

The thing about Rhode Island is, if something is more than 15 minutes away, it's too far. When you put that limit on travels it makes the state seem bigger. ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that many of us here have any first hand experience with Woonsocket such that we could give you honest valuable advice about it.

The thing about Rhode Island is, if something is more than 15 minutes away, it's too far. When you put that limit on travels it makes the state seem bigger.  ^_^

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I grew up in Woonsocket. The city itself is horrible. Inbred, ignorant, depressing. really awful. That being said, it has some GREAT housing stock, and if you dont mind living somewhat isolated from the community around you, then there are some pretty good deals to be had. My only concern is that the market is starting to catch-up to the rest of rhode island and it makes it not really worth the sacrifice. It used to be that you could get huge astonishing victorians in the North End for a song, and thats just not the case anymore. There is an AWESOME former bank on Main St for sale that could be friggen amazing. the downside is that A) you have to live in woonsocket, and B) Who would buy it if you sank any decent amount of money into it. The other issue is the isolation. If you are commuting to Boston and take the train from Franklin it isnt half bad. Getting to the rest of RI kind of sucks though. Rt146 isnt that long, but its a really lousy road. I would take Pawtucket over Woonsocket any day for its proximity to the highway alone.

Liam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your goal is to work in Boston and live in RI, then I can recommend the North End of Providence. I live right off 95, can get to the South Attleboro T stop in less than 10 minutes, and there is an express train into Back Bay that only takes 48 minutes. If you look in the right areas there are good deals on housing and some nice and quiet streets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I would take Pawtucket over Woonsocket any day for its proximity to the highway alone.

Thanks so much, Liam, for all the info. and your honest appraisal of Woonsocket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your goal is to work in Boston and live in RI, then I can recommend the North End of Providence. I live right off 95, can get to the South Attleboro T stop in less than 10 minutes, and there is an express train into Back Bay that only takes 48 minutes. If you look in the right areas there are good deals on housing and some nice and quiet streets.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Jenkins, I plan to commute to Cambridge, so that's helpful. Tell me more about the North end of Providence. From what I've read, College Hill, Wayland. Foxpoint, Elmhurst and Down City usually get most of the good press. What areas in the North end do you like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own a house in Pawtucket and commute to Cambridge 4-5 days a week. I can get to the South Attleboro train stop in literally 2 minutes.

My house is a 5 min drive from downtown Providence and if I feel in the mood for the it I can walk to the east side.

I've lived in Providence for the last 15 years, Having already lived all over the east side ( Wayland, fox point etc)... lived on Smith hill... and spent the last 5 years on the West side. Having been priced out of apartments in the past I saw the writing on the wall and bought a place in Pawtucket. I would have loved to stay on the West side but I didnt want to miss another window closing.

- this is my first posting here though I've been trolling for awhile.. this site is great and really informative.. Hey Liam!

Thanks, Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own a house in Pawtucket and commute to Cambridge 4-5 days a week.  I can get to the South Attleboro train stop in literally 2 minutes. 

  My house is a 5 min drive from downtown Providence and if I feel in the mood for the it I can walk to the east side.

  I've lived in Providence for the last 15 years,  Having already lived all over the east side ( Wayland,  fox point etc)... lived on Smith hill... and spent the last 5 years on the West side.  Having been priced out of apartments in the past I saw the writing on the wall and bought a place in Pawtucket.  I would have loved to stay on the West side but I didnt want to miss another window closing. 

- this is my first posting here though I've been trolling for awhile.. this site is great and really informative.. Hey Liam!

  Thanks,  Jason

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks. That's helpful, Jason. Just wondering how you happened to decide on Pawtucket rather than buying in Providence? Was Pawtucket just better financially? Pawtucket gets some negative press. Can you recommend areas you like in Pawtucket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- this is my first posting here though I've been trolling for awhile.. this site is great and really informative.. Hey Liam!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- this is my first posting here though I've been trolling for awhile.. this site is great and really informative.. Hey Liam!

  Thanks,  Jason

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Man! You're everywhere lately!!!

I will second Eltron's comment that its good to have a bonafide rockstar on the board :-)

Liam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jenkins, I plan to commute to Cambridge, so that's helpful. Tell me more about the North end of Providence. From what I've read, College Hill, Wayland. Foxpoint, Elmhurst and Down City usually get most of the good press. What areas in the North end do you like?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi Patsfan (season ticket holder myself!). The North End is kind of like living in Malden or Medford or maybe Brighton. It is more of an old neighborhood, with older and smaller houses and a fair amount of older retired types, than living in Jamaica Plain or Cambridge, where you are right in the heart of stores and bars. Sounds boring, but makes for quiet and well kept neighborhoods. If I want excitement I am just a mile or so from downcity or the eastside. The best part is that I live right off exit 25, so avoid much of the traffic that backs up at the 95/195 split. Believe me, when commuting to Boston, that makes a difference. I picked Providence over Pawtucket, because, well, it's Providence and not Pawtucket :whistling: I am that much closer to all the city has to offer, and happen to also have a view of the State House from my house. If you look into housing around here, look at the streets between Silver Spring and Windmill. Good luck, and let me know if you have any questions (for instance there is currently a modest sized ranch house on a quiet dead end street near me that is selling for well under 300K)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Patsfan (season ticket holder myself!).  The North End is kind of like living in Malden or Medford or maybe Brighton. It is more of an old neighborhood, with older and smaller houses and a fair amount of older retired types, than living in Jamaica Plain or Cambridge, where you are right in the heart of stores and bars. Sounds boring, but makes for quiet and well kept neighborhoods. If I want excitement I am just a mile or so from downcity or the eastside. The best part is that I live right off exit 25, so avoid much of the traffic that backs up at the 95/195 split. Believe me, when commuting to Boston, that makes a difference. I picked Providence over Pawtucket, because, well, it's Providence and not Pawtucket  :whistling:  I am that much closer to all the city has to offer, and happen to also have a view of the State House from my house. If you look into housing around here, look at the streets between Silver Spring and Windmill. Good luck, and let me know if you have any questions (for instance there is currently a modest sized ranch house on a quiet dead end street near me that is selling for well under 300K)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks a lot, fellow Pats season ticket holder. I appreciated all your references. I know those towns in Mass well. I'll definitely check out the streets between Silver Spring and Windmill in the North End. I have to admit the lower tax rate in Pawtucket is rather appealing though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks a lot, fellow Pats season ticket holder.  I appreciated all your references. I know those towns in Mass well. I'll definitely check out the streets between Silver Spring and Windmill  in the North End. I have to admit the lower tax rate in Pawtucket is rather appealing though.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

No problem. But don't be fooled by the listed tax rates; there is a 50% homestead deduction in Providence, which means the actual tax rate is half of $29.65, assuming you live in the property you own. The tax rate in Pawtucket is $17.25, with no homestead deduction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem. But don't be fooled by the listed tax rates; there is a 50% homestead deduction in Providence, which means the actual tax rate is half of  $29.65, assuming you live in the property you own. The tax rate in Pawtucket is $17.25, with no homestead deduction.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I didn't know about the homestead deduction. That definitely gives Providence the edge. Thanks again, Jenkins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own a house in Pawtucket and commute to Cambridge 4-5 days a week.  I can get to the South Attleboro train stop in literally 2 minutes. 

Jason

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, I explored Providence and vicinity this afternoon. I'm looking for a single family home around $200,000. I really like what I saw! Before I get to that, LIAM, you were so right about Woonsocket. It really has a ways to go. The North End, JENKINS, was everything you said it was. I liked it a lot. That was probably my favorite neighborhood, so far. Canada Pond is a real plus too! BLOODYROCKER, Pawtucket was also very impressive. I hadn't been there for over 10 years when I saw the PawSox last. It looks very different! Can you recommend any particular neighborhoods?

I also liked a neighborhood on the East Side- -perhaps called Summit? It was on Hope Street between Lauriston St. and Overhill Rd. There were some restaurants a CVS and other stores. Does anyone know if there are single family homes in that area? I saw a lot of two story homes. It seemed like a really nice area. Thanks everybody.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also liked a neighborhood on the East Side- -perhaps called Summit?  It was on Hope Street between Lauriston St. and Overhill Rd. There were some restaurants a CVS and other stores. Does anyone know if there are single family homes in that area? I saw a lot of two story homes. It seemed like a really nice area. Thanks everybody.

Tom

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey Patsfan,

I live in the Summit neighborhood and recommend it highly. It's got nice houses, a mix of single families and two to three families as well as a great commercial center, the highlights for me being the Rochambeau library and Seven Stars Bakery. Also great Indian place called Not Just Spices.

The only catch is that the area is not the bargain it once was. There was a time, maybe 5 years ago, when you could get a nice house for $150,000 if it was west of Hope St., because, the thinking went, west of Hope is close to Camp St., which is an area with some inner city issues.

Now the idea of West of Hope is pretty much gone and the area has come up to par with much of the rest of the East Side. A nice house is now about $350-400K, not cheap but better than Boston.

I know some of the folks on this forum feel that the Oak Hill neighborhood in Pawtucket, which is adjacent to Summit, is a tad too suburban, but I think it's a pretty neat place with an increasingly hip quality to it. People I know who live in Oak Hill love it.

The North End around where you went is definitely a better value and still kinda overlooked. Unlike some parts of the North End like Wanskuck which are pretty rough the part around Windmill seems pretty stable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The North End, JENKINS, was everything you said it was. I liked it a lot. That was probably my favorite neighborhood, so far. Tom

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Glad you had a chance to check out the area that I mentioned. I noticed two or three houses for sale on Seneca Street this weekend (it intersects with Windmill St. near the Pawtucket line, might even technically be Pawtucket at that point for all I know). That is a very nice and wide street with good houses. Definitely check that out if you get a chance. There is also a house on Enterprise Street for sale, which is quiet, dead end street off of Smart Street (which intersects Windmill). Good luck looking. Summit area is cool because you are close to Hope Street, but definitely stay away from Camp Street (unless you are looking to pick up some product :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Patsfan,

I live in the Summit neighborhood and recommend it highly. It's got nice houses, a mix of single families and two to three families as well as a great commercial center, the highlights for me being the Rochambeau library and Seven Stars Bakery. Also great Indian place called Not Just Spices.

The only catch is that the area is not the bargain it once was. There was a time, maybe 5 years ago, when you could get a nice house for $150,000 if it was west of Hope St., because, the thinking went, west of Hope is close to Camp St., which is an area with some inner city issues.

Now the idea of West of Hope is pretty much gone and the area has come up to par with much of the rest of the East Side. A nice house is now about $350-400K, not cheap but better than Boston.

I know some of the folks on this forum feel that the Oak Hill neighborhood in Pawtucket, which is adjacent to Summit, is a tad too suburban, but I think it's a pretty neat place with an increasingly hip quality to it. People I know who live in Oak Hill love it.

The North End around where you went is definitely a better value and still kinda overlooked. Unlike some parts of the North End like Wanskuck which are pretty rough the part around Windmill seems pretty stable.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Greg, I really liked what I saw in Summit. Unfortunately I don't think I can afford it. I probably shouldn't go above $225,000. I'll definitely avoid Camp Street on the east and Wanskuck in the north end. Thanks for your help!

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you had a chance to check out the area that I mentioned. I noticed two or three houses for sale on Seneca Street this weekend (it intersects with Windmill St. near the Pawtucket line, might even technically be Pawtucket at that point for all I know). That is a very nice and wide street with good houses. Definitely check that out if you get a chance. There is also a house on Enterprise Street for sale, which is quiet, dead end street off of Smart Street (which intersects Windmill). Good luck looking. Summit area is cool because you are close to Hope Street, but definitely stay away from Camp Street (unless you are looking to pick up some product :wacko:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks a lot, Jenkins. I'll check out those houses you mentioned.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I explored Providence and vicinity this afternoon. I'm looking for a single family home around $200,000. I really like what I saw! Before I get to that, LIAM, you were so right about Woonsocket. It really has a ways to go.  The North End, JENKINS, was everything you said it was. I liked it a lot. That was probably my favorite neighborhood, so far. Canada Pond is a real plus too!  BLOODYROCKER, Pawtucket was also very impressive. I hadn't been there for over 10 years when I saw the PawSox last. It looks very different! Can you recommend any particular neighborhoods?

I also liked a neighborhood on the East Side- -perhaps called Summit?  It was on Hope Street between Lauriston St. and Overhill Rd. There were some restaurants a CVS and other stores. Does anyone know if there are single family homes in that area? I saw a lot of two story homes. It seemed like a really nice area. Thanks everybody.

Tom

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thats great ! It Looks like your really putting in some time and learning about the various great neighborhoods that Providence and vicinity have to offer.

I live right behind Lukes records on Broadway in Pawtucket. its pretty cool... very working class. no-one bothers us at all.. you hear the occasional booming system from a car once in awhile but i think that you hear that anywhere.

Its funny... our budget was also 225000 at the high end and thats what we ended up spending on our single family. there is a single family next to us that will be going up for sale in the next few weeks. I understand and its pretty nice.. 2 car garage bungalow type place. If your looking around that area our house is 9 daniels st and the house i mention is the yellow single right next to ours.

-Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.