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motonenterprises

Is Greenville becoming a big city?

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My opinion is yes! Of course I did move here from Greenwood. Development seems to be wide open all over the county not just the city. Clear from Greer to Simpsonville. What are your opinions and why?

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Yes, but the problem is that alot of people are in denial, though it seems like the denial is fading a little. Greenville is a fairly well known city- so much that if someone doesn't know where Spartanburg is I can say "Well, do you know where Greenville is? Yes? well its near there" and they say "Ok, cool."

I think that while it doesn't feel big, it has alot of big city problems and that creates more problems because people refuse to believe that their town is large.

While it isn't the largest city, it is in the largest region of SC and can easily take the role of leader in our community.

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In a word, No. Upstate SC is what could accurately be described as sprawlopolis. Alot of people live up there, but there is no rhyme or reason to what is going on.

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...Alot of people live up there, but there is no rhyme or reason to what is going on.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I, and thousands like me take offense at that kind of remark, though it doesn't surprise me at all. It is nice that people are able to state their opinions about certain topics, but they mean absolutely nothing when no evidence is given to support them. In such cases, it appears worthless. :huh:

BTW, in case you haven't noticed, the Upstate is the hub of all business in the State, and projections for the near future only have the area becoming even stronger. :D

As I said earlier, people come to Greenville because they absolutely LOVE it! There is charm here which has become the envy of cities around the world. :D

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BTW, in case you haven't noticed, the Upstate is the hub of all business in the State, and projections for the near future only have the area becoming even stronger. :D

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The Upstate is also becoming increasingly dominant in politics (both US senators are from the Upstate)

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I, and thousands like me take offense at that kind of remark, though it doesn't surprise me at all.  It is nice that people are able to state their opinions about certain topics, but they mean absolutely nothing when no evidence is given to support them.  In such cases, it appears worthless. :huh:

BTW, in case you haven't noticed, the Upstate is the hub of all business in the State, and projections for the near future only have the area becoming even stronger. :D

As I said earlier, people come to Greenville because they absolutely LOVE it!  There is charm here which has become the envy of cities around the world. :D

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Couldn't have said it better myself. I also take offense to this earlier statement as you can probably tell in my previous post. The upstate has more investments per capita than any other area in the state and more foreign investments per capita than any other area in the country. I think it is indeed on its way to a big city.

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moton I don't think anybody is trying to tear apart Greenville. Opinions are simply being stated that's all. You did ask for input?

Is Greenville becoming a big city? Well I think it all depends upon how you look at it! I personally see all three of SC's big three on the same level. No one region has one up on another but that's my perspective. Remember I grew up in Columbia so alot of new developments, road/interstate construction, "skyscrapers", and yes even sprawl, I have seen in C-lum for years. So if the Barringer building is renovated into apartments I think, "eh about time".

To me all SC cities are well established mid-sized cities (MSA/CSA), and each has the potential to become a larger more regional city like Charlotte. I know alot of people consider Charlotte a big city but I've always seen it as a mid sized city that's a little larger than Columbia, but remember that was my perspective growing up here. To me the only thing Charlotte had that C-lum didn't was a taller skyline, but C-lum had 3 major highways, many buildings DT, major college athletics that drew crowds many professional teams would like to have, C-lum just doesn't have as many people, but that's beside the point. I tend to look for cities that can offer something that I didn't grow up with (larger DT, more than 6-8 lanes of interstate traffic, more than 4 shopping malls, etc.). Now when I go to Atlanta I see a huge difference between it and C-lum, so naturally I looked at ATL as beeing the next step up.

Greenville has a bright future and I'm sure it will grow to the level of Charlotte is today. But saying that Columbia has a bright future as well and I'm sure it will be at the level of present day Charlotte as well. There alot of development that flys under the radar here, & Columbia has been ranked pretty high on a lot of "Americas Best" #28 Forbes "Best Places" behind Charlotte, #21 Expansion Mgt. Magazine, 5th most Creative city, #1 midsized college city, one of "America's most livable cities", so we have alot to be proud of here as well! Ten years ago C-lum wouldn't have even been thought of on one of these list. Downtown Columbia looks and feels more urban, DT Greenville looks feels more quainte. However if C-lum isn't to your liking then that's OK, same with Gville. You know different strokes for different folks?

But to answer your question I see Gville transforming itself into a larger city, so are the rest of the states major towns as well. The latest data I seen has the Charleston MSA growing the fastest of the three. Columbia and Greenville are growing at about the same rate. In the 2000 census Columbia had the largest %tage gain of the 3 major SC metros, and Gville-Spa-And had the largest #'s gain.

2000 Census but these are the outdated MSA's of course.

Greenville may be the hub of business in the state, but C-lum is the hub for state govt., or layers or doctors, or has the largest % of those with a bachelor degree or higher, Charleston obviously tourism although I think Myrtle is a strong contender. The point is it's a matter of perspective and what you want to bring to light!

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I, and thousands like me take offense at that kind of remark, though it doesn't surprise me at all.

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Skyliner, I stand by my remarks. There is no rhyme or reason to zoning or development in Upstate South Carolina. As far as being the hub of business in South Carolina? I don't know if the upstate is much ahead of other regions, but it is probably ahead. The question on this thread is Greenville becoming a big CITY? The emphasis is on city. While the Upstate of SC is the most heavily populated region of the state, it is a string of growing small towns to small cities. I see no indication that any of the cities in the Upstate are becoming "a big city".

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I agree with you, and I'd hazard a guess that your remark wasn't simply a dig on Greenville or the Upstate. I live in Raleigh, and I'd make the same comment about this region as well. The triangle, along with the Upstate, and darn near 100% of the South, is sprawlopolis. Even though some towns (Houston, Atlanta, and Charlotte to name a few) do have some fairly substantial "downtown" areas, and despite any politicians' best efforts, 98% of the development and growth in the South is suburban and will continue as such for the forseeable future. This is true for one simple reason: there is tons of cheap, easily developable land still available. It will be many, many years until you'll be able to find a city in the South with all the truly "big city" amenities packed into a truly urban, "big city" environment.

Of course, each person has their own definition of what constitutes a "big city," so your mileage may vary...

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The interesting thing here is that the 3 big cities in SC: Greenville, Columbia, and Charleston are not at all the same (particularly if you consider how they have developed), so it makes it difficult to compare the 3. Greenville and Spartanburg could be compared on some levels since they both came about in similar ways.

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Of course, each person has their own definition of what constitutes a "big city," so your mileage may vary...

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This is true. I thought Columbia was the big city when I first came here. Its all about appearance. People assume that cities with skylines reflect thier size, which isn't always the case.

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I agree with you, and I'd hazard a guess that your remark wasn't simply a dig on Greenville or the Upstate. I live in Raleigh, and I'd make the same comment about this region as well. The triangle, along with the Upstate, and darn near 100% of the South, is sprawlopolis. Even though some towns (Houston, Atlanta, and Charlotte to name a few) do have some fairly substantial "downtown" areas, and despite any politicians' best efforts, 98% of the development and growth in the South is suburban and will continue as such for the forseeable future. This is true for one simple reason: there is tons of cheap, easily developable land still available. It will be many, many years until you'll be able to find a city in the South with all the truly "big city" amenities packed into a truly urban, "big city" environment.

Of course, each person has their own definition of what constitutes a "big city," so your mileage may vary...

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Exactly, Orulz. I would say the same thing about much of Lexington County. Mobile Homes next to mansions, clear cutting land with no regard to landscaping, etc. The question was, "Is Greenville becoming a big city?" and to that the answer is no.

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I see no indication that any of the cities in the Upstate are becoming "a big city".

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Again, I must remind you that it is not simply the census number of residents that makes a city big, but rather the inclusion of the entire metropolis (sprawlopolis if you want to call it) that determines the status of any decently sized city. In Greenville's case, while the numbers of residents (which are rapidly growing) may still be unimpressive to an outsider, you absolutely must look at the fact that over two hundred thousand people populate it during the day (working hours and evening hours). And that is the city of Greenville alone! Remember that the county of Greenville is also the most populated in the entire state, and is surrounded by other counties with large numbers of residents as well. In my opinion, suburban population plays a major roll in the level of any city, because without the suburbs, most would be far less impressive or notable. :)

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We'll have to agree to disagree I suppose.

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Exactly. :D

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Waccamatt's decision is not based on numbers, but something else. I say again, if Greenville isn't becoming a big city neither is Columbia.

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there is tons of cheap, easily developable land still available.

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I totally agree with that statement! Northern and western cities are more expensive (house prices, cost of living, gas, etc..) as compared to southern cities some of it is due to a high quality of life & unavailible cheap land in some areas (Portland, Seattle, Chicago, Boston, etc..). The south on the other hand like you said has an abundance of cheap land that can be developed. Why pay more if you can build it 20 miles from the core for a fraction of the price? How many Wal-Marts have you seen in large northen cities? From a developmental standpoint you just get more bang for your buck in the south. Lexington County is a perfect example of this. It was the states 5th fastest growing county (%, and population) according to the census (02-03), and for the most part Lexington is a very rural undeveloped county, I would say most of Lexington County's 226,000 people live in the shadow of Columbia, but yet it's sprawling like wildfire, Kershaw County is heading down that same road as well.

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...Lexington County is a perfect example of this. It was the states 5th fastest growing county (%, and population) according to the census (02-03), and for the most part Lexington is a very rural undeveloped county, I would say most of Lexington Countie's 226,000 people live in the shadow of Columbia, but yet it's sprawling like wildfire, Kershaw County is heading down that same road as well.

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Thank you, Sandlapper! You improve the validity of my claim. How many of those residents in Lexington actually work in Columbia? You see my point, that while urban sprawl is detestible, in most cases a city's daytime population is the more important way to examine its size. :thumbsup:

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Sprawl is a terrible waste of land. Just because doing something a certain way is cheaper, does that make it right? That's kind of like saying the clearcutting of the Amazon rainforest is acceptable.

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