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Allan

Detroit's Indian Village Neighborhood

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Detroit's most architecturally diverse neighborhood is an area known as Indian Village, located on the city's east side. The area was developed starting in 1895, with most of the development being completed by the 1920s. There are seventeen different architectural styles represented in the neighborhood. Homes were designed by prominent architects in the area, such as Albert Kahn, Louis Kamper, and William Stratton. The neighborhood contains 351 homes, and was designated a historic district in 1972.

A brick Colonial on Seminole Street

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There are some great entryways in the neighborhood. This one has front doors that are cut to match the archway on the porch.

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Another brick home on Seminole Street

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This house one block over on Iroquois Street has more of an Arts and Crafts influence

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A house just down the street

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There seems to be a lot of homes with half timber exteriors.

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The Arthur and Clara Buhl house was constructed in 1908 and was designed by James Scott. The Buhl fortune would later build the Buhl Building downtown.

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Not only does this home have a round turret, but the glass in the windows is also curved to match the curve of the walls.

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A US and a Canadian flag fly side by side on this house.

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Looking south along Iroquois Street.

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The Mary G. Edgar house was designed by Chittenden and Kotting in 1913.

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A Victorian on Iroquois near Jefferson.

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The house across the street.

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Some more half timber work

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The Russell House was designed in 1890 by Walter S. Russell. It originally stood at the corner of Jefferson and Joseph Campau, but was moved in 1921 to its current site and reconstructed in reverse image. It is one of the last remaining Jefferson Avenue mansions.

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A gigantic house - I don't have any info on this one, but I'd be interested to find out more.

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This concludes my Indian Village tour for now. I hope you enjoyed looking at some of Detroit's architectural treasures. :)

Up Next: Woodbridge

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Now why don't people talk about this when they talk about Detroit?! Great job Allan on another wonderful thread.

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Now why don't people talk about this when they talk about Detroit?!  Great job Allan on another wonderful thread.

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Because it's not a story. It's always much easier to kick something when it's down rather than report on the good things. Not that Detroit's without its problems--but it's time to be more optomistic.

And once again, great photo thread, Allan! The architecture in Indian Village is just absolutely priceless. It's a shame we'll never see anything like that being built again.

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Great tour as usual, Allan! I wish more of the city was like Indian Village. Been there in person and you captured the neighborhood very well.

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Nice tour!

This time I will add a few of my own pics of the neighborhood...

layeredroofhouse.jpg

Image-C1F19EA7D76211D8.jpg

Image-C1F21F06D76211D8.jpg

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That is the Detroit that I never really hear about. It is a shame that the city is spoken of that highly because areas such as those are really incredible. Allan, thank you for sharing the other Detroit with us.

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Nice photos, Doug. I went through Indian Village again today, but the city doesn't know how to clear main roads, let alone sidestreets, so I almost got stuck 8 or 9 times. I guess the only way to get your streets plowed is to snowblow them yourself, because the city won't ever get around to doing it, that's for sure! The snow will probably melt on its own before the city gets around to plowing it. No wonder people are leaving the city...it can't even provide basic services anymore....

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Well, you were driving in the middle of what turned out to be a blizzard yesterday, with 12" of snow dumped, so it wasn't your typical day.

I'd guess that the main roads are clear today. But I agree that plowing on side streets is often a problem, sometimes it takes a while for them to get to all the side streets. Indian Village actually has a private snowplow service in addition to regular city plowing, so the side streets in Indian Village are clear right now as I'm looking out the window.

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Since we're talking about snow, here are a couple of snowy pics of the neighborhood... :)

iroquois_block_east.jpg

iroquois_block_west.jpg

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I thought that Indian Village had a private plowing company, but after seeing the streets yesterday I wasn't so sure. With as much snow as we got it wouldn't surprise me if the plows got stuck on the way there.

The neighborhood does look really beautiful in the wintertime. I kind of wanted to take some photos yesterday, but I didn't dare stop, since then I might get stuck. My friends only had to get out and push once though. Haha. I should've just stayed home, but oh well.

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Detroit's most architecturally diverse neighborhood is an area known as Indian Village, located on the city's east side.  The area was developed starting in 1895, with most of the development being completed by the 1920s.  There are seventeen different architectural styles represented in the neighborhood.  Homes were designed by prominent architects in the area, such as Albert Kahn, Louis Kamper, and William Stratton.  The neighborhood contains 351 homes, and was designated a historic district in 1972.

A brick Colonial on Seminole Street

IMG_2492.jpg

There are some great entryways in the neighborhood.  This one has front doors that are cut to match the archway on the porch.

IMG_2493.jpg

IMG_2494.jpg

Another brick home on Seminole Street

IMG_2495.jpg

This house one block over on Iroquois Street has more of an Arts and Crafts influence

IMG_2500.jpg

A house just down the street

IMG_2501.jpg

There seems to be a lot of homes with half timber exteriors.

IMG_2502.jpg

IMG_2504.jpg

The Arthur and Clara Buhl house was constructed in 1908 and was designed by James Scott.  The Buhl fortune would later build the Buhl Building downtown.

IMG_2505.jpg

Not only does this home have a round turret, but the glass in the windows is also curved to match the curve of the walls.

IMG_2507.jpg

IMG_2510.jpg

A US and a Canadian flag fly side by side on this house.

IMG_2511.jpg

Looking south along Iroquois Street.

IMG_2512.jpg

IMG_2513.jpg

The Mary G. Edgar house was designed by Chittenden and Kotting in 1913. 

IMG_2514.jpg

IMG_2521.jpg

A Victorian on Iroquois near Jefferson.

IMG_2517.jpg

The house across the street.

IMG_2518.jpg

Some more half timber work

IMG_2522.jpg

IMG_2524.jpg

The Russell House was designed in 1890 by Walter S. Russell.  It originally stood at the corner of Jefferson and Joseph Campau, but was moved in 1921 to its current site and reconstructed in reverse image.  It is one of the last remaining Jefferson Avenue mansions.

IMG_2525.jpg

IMG_2527.jpg

IMG_2528.jpg

A gigantic house - I don't have any info on this one, but I'd be interested to find out more.

IMG_2529.jpg

This concludes my Indian Village tour for now.  I hope you enjoyed looking at some of Detroit's architectural treasures.  :)

Up Next: Woodbridge

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are there any noteable people living in the indian village, people who will continue to improve and maintain the area?

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One of my favorite Detroit neighborhoods. I have a friend who lives there, I'll have to ask if he knows of anybody significant.

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One of my favorite Detroit neighborhoods.  I have a friend who lives there, I'll have to ask if he knows of anybody significant.

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i am new to this site ... i was trying to find information about the indian village and this is were i was lead... i just drove through the village today, beautiful homes. i am familiar with the grosse points and use to live in a historic home myself in riverside ca....

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i am new to this site ... i was trying to find information about the indian village and this is were i was lead... i just drove through the village today, beautiful homes. i am familiar with the grosse points and use to live in a historic home myself  in riverside ca....

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Welcome to the forum! I don't know of anybody significant who lives in the neighborhood, although I'm sure there are significant people living there. Another forumer, Dougw, lives in Indian Village, so he'd probably know. However, I have not seen him on the forum in a couple of months.

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Norfolk has a section of the city that called Ghent it looks similar too Indian Village but its a little bit closer together.

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I am thinking of moving to the Parkstone or Parkhurst apartments on the corner of Agnes and Jefferson (kind of on the edge of Indian Village). Can anyone comment about safety in the area? I am more concerned about my person than my car, as I will have secure parking.

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I wouldn't really be concerned about my safety in Indian Village. The people in the neighborhood really seem to watch out for each other. The neighborhoods surrounding the historic district are a bit gritty, but nothing that I'd be too worried about. To the east of IV is West Village, which is another nice neighborhood with more modest homes.

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I spent a lot of time in the area in the spring, and I concur. You have nothing to worry about. Even the poorer areas that have experienced a lot of disinvestment are not dangerous, just folks trying to make a living.

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